young children – Abilities Networks http://abilitiesnetworks.org/ Sat, 16 Apr 2022 23:23:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-4.png young children – Abilities Networks http://abilitiesnetworks.org/ 32 32 Family and Child Development Coaching with Phoebe MacRae https://abilitiesnetworks.org/family-and-child-development-coaching-with-phoebe-macrae/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 18:30:14 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/family-and-child-development-coaching-with-phoebe-macrae/ “Phoebe MacRae, classical singer and brain connection expert, helps children with disabilities live beyond limits.” Maximize children’s potential by forming new brain patterns and connections PORTLAND, GOLD – Infancy and toddlerhood are widely considered to be the most critical stages of brain development. Yes, the brain changes throughout life, but from birth until around age […]]]>

“Phoebe MacRae, classical singer and brain connection expert, helps children with disabilities live beyond limits.”

Maximize children’s potential by forming new brain patterns and connections

PORTLAND, GOLD – Infancy and toddlerhood are widely considered to be the most critical stages of brain development. Yes, the brain changes throughout life, but from birth until around age seven, children are constantly forming new brain patterns. This is the time when parents can step up their leadership role to support their children’s development.

Children who have missed developmental milestones or disabilities, in particular, often need exceptional leaders to fully access their learning brains. With the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact, including the use of face masks, increased screen use and rising levels of anxiety among children and adults, children need the leadership of their parents to optimize their baby’s development in terms of speech, language and social skills. .

Phoebe MacRae, CEO of Brilliant Movement, Anat Baniel Method® NeuroMovement® practitioner and creator of the Simple Songs and Gentle Moves program, helps parents learn how to be fantastic leaders for their child(ren). Parents learn to form rich and dynamic bonds with their developing children in a time when life is becoming increasingly difficult. In addition to her expertise and credentials as a coach, Phoebe has extensive musical experience. She is an award-winning graduate of the University of British Columbia’s Master of Music program and has been singing professionally for 25 years.

As a professional coach, lifelong singer, and mother of three, Phoebe brings a unique skill set and perspective to family and child development coaching. Her Simple Songs and Gentle Moves program combines natural, easy and brain-boosting NeuroMovement® exercises with the gentle power of music. Under her guidance, parents learn to sing and play with their babies or young children in a way that optimizes their little brain for connection and development. During the program, parents gain a better understanding of the growing brain and how brain patterns are formed. They learn slow, gentle movements that generate new possibilities for learning and functioning.

Unlike many therapists and coaches who seek to “fix” or solve a problem, Phoebe is much more focused on guiding her students down a path that will help them easily form new brain connections and intelligence, by optimizing their physical, mental and emotional abilities. well-being.

“The process I use is a paradigm shift from traditional therapies (physical, occupational, speech/language) that focus on ‘fixing’ the child. I focus on connecting rather than fixing. This approach provides the best conditions for brain connections to form easily and naturally, resulting in endless potential for growth.

Raising children during a pandemic is no small feat and Phoebe is committed to ensuring that parents receive all the support they need at this time, whether their child is born with or without a disability. As a result, the 60-minute Simple Songs and Gentle Moves program is now offered virtually worldwide.

For more information about Phoebe, Brilliant Movement and her Simple Songs and Gentle Moves program, visit her website today. Parents can find out if it would work for them and their kids by booking a free 20-minute discovery call with Phoebe here.

Media Contact
Company Name: Brilliant movement
Contact: Phoebe MacRae
E-mail: Send an email
Town: PORTLAND
State: WHERE
The country: United States
Website: www.brilliantmovement.net

]]>
Council changes race training so teachers say toddlers are ‘race unaware’ and not ‘innocent’ https://abilitiesnetworks.org/council-changes-race-training-so-teachers-say-toddlers-are-race-unaware-and-not-innocent/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 13:55:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/council-changes-race-training-so-teachers-say-toddlers-are-race-unaware-and-not-innocent/ A council has changed its race training for teachers to say toddlers are ‘race oblivious’ rather than ‘racially innocent’ in a public rundown after outrage from parents. Brighton and Hove City Council sparked an uproar in January after the Sunday Telegraph reported that its ‘racial literacy’ sessions for hundreds of school staff would see seven-year-olds […]]]>

A council has changed its race training for teachers to say toddlers are ‘race oblivious’ rather than ‘racially innocent’ in a public rundown after outrage from parents.

Brighton and Hove City Council sparked an uproar in January after the Sunday Telegraph reported that its ‘racial literacy’ sessions for hundreds of school staff would see seven-year-olds say they were seeing ‘the white at the top of the hierarchy”.

It prompted the intervention of Nadhim Zahawi, the education secretary, who sent officials to investigate the ‘worrying’ conferences amid accusations from MPs that they had potentially defied education and education laws. ‘equality.

Now the Green-led council has released a new version of its five-year ‘anti-racism education strategy’. He says “there is plenty of evidence” that three-year-olds are learning markers of racial hierarchy and adds: “Yet the widespread view that children, especially young children, are not racially aware persist.”

This section previously said, “Yet the widespread view that children, especially young children, are racially ‘innocent,’ persists.”

The new strategy, released this week, also removed the entire section endorsing Critical Race Theory (CRT), a radical ideology that deploys the concept of white privilege and rejects a “colorblind” approach.

Since the five-year project launched in 2020, the first of its kind in Britain, the council had proudly said how its lessons were ‘underpinned by a CRT analytical lens’ with a focus on viewing individual racist incidents as a problem systemic.

The raid to remove explicit mention of the CRT comes after 5,000 parents petitioned council officials objecting to it “teaching our children that they are racist or victimized by their classmates”.

But the council’s new approach, which will be approved tomorrow, extends its ‘racial literacy curriculum framework’ to nurseries, with basic settings for year one and key pupils in stage one – from birth to seven. – now covered. Previously, it applied to children aged seven and over.

The board plans to ‘integrate racially specific literacy classes’ into the curriculum throughout the summer and fall terms this year and says it will ‘extend the philosophy to children and adults. ‘other pedagogies that support meaningful racial literacy’.

Adrian Hart, whose son is in sixth grade in the city and led the petition with campaign group Don’t Divide Us, said ‘this is just a removal of the label from the box, the contents remain the same”.

“Politics remains fully informed and based on race-dividing ideas and beliefs that continue to be presented as undisputed facts,” he added.

Hannah Clare, the deputy leader of the council who last week criticized ‘vanitarian’ Tory councilors for wanting a £200,000 statue in the south coast town to celebrate the Queen’s Jubilee, is spending £500,000 on the running lessons.

She denied that the council was breaking the law and said the amendments were driven by community engagement, not government comments or legal advice.

“We simply want our educational environments to be places where every child can learn and thrive, where everyone feels safe and equal, and where we all have a strong sense of identity and belonging,” he said. she declared.

A spokesman for the Department for Education said: “Boards and schools should be aware of their legal obligation to teach certain issues in a balanced way.

“Given the particular sensitivity and range of viewpoints around some theories that go beyond the shared principle that racism is unacceptable, teachers must ensure that children are informed in an unbiased way and appropriate for their age and do not present the contested ideas as fact.”

]]>
Hospice offers bereavement training to primary schools to help grieving students https://abilitiesnetworks.org/hospice-offers-bereavement-training-to-primary-schools-to-help-grieving-students/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 07:06:49 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/hospice-offers-bereavement-training-to-primary-schools-to-help-grieving-students/ DERBYSHIRE’s charity, Treetops Hospice, offers local primary schools training and advice on how to support bereaved pupils. The training helps teachers and school support staff to better understand how children aged 5 to 11 deal with death, how to recognize common reactions to bereavement and how to support children when a loved one dies. Jules […]]]>

DERBYSHIRE’s charity, Treetops Hospice, offers local primary schools training and advice on how to support bereaved pupils.

The training helps teachers and school support staff to better understand how children aged 5 to 11 deal with death, how to recognize common reactions to bereavement and how to support children when a loved one dies.

Jules Kirk, Treetops Therapeutic Services Manager and Children’s Services Manager, explained in more detail:

“We know how difficult the last eighteen months have been for the younger generation. Isolation and coming out of isolation, the absence of family and friends and the inability to say goodbye at funerals all had a detrimental effect on how children and young people coped after the death of a loved one.

“Schools are also seeing these effects in their students and want to do more to help as a first line of support, so we’ve introduced this new training to tackle it head-on.”

All children react to death and understand it in their own way, explains Jules.

“How a child experiences grief depends on many factors, not just their age. Their reactions can be affected by their cognitive ability, emotional literacy, broader family and social dynamics, and culture and beliefs.

“In our training, we explain what children think about death at different ages. Young children have a limited sense of time, for example, they often view death as a temporary absence of that loved one. Older children understand that death is irreversible, but sometimes believe that the deceased person can still see or hear them.

“We train staff to recognize these reactions in their students and give them the skills and confidence to help children safely and appropriately. We also suggest ways the wider school can help, such as policies a school can benefit from. »

One of the first schools to sign up for the training is Lanes School in Beeston, Nottinghamshire. Elaine Allcoat, Principal Teaching Assistant, explained why he is invaluable:

“Schools play an important role in the life of every child and support key events that affect their lives.

“Supporting students after any trauma, including bereavement, is an essential part of our work. We don’t want to be wrong because it’s so important. The training really gave us confidence and guided us in how to approach these difficult situations.

“Treetops staff helped make it easier to talk about a difficult topic and the whole session was interactive and personal. We recommend other schools take this opportunity.

Treetops grief training is available at primary schools in Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire. Schools interested in finding out more should contact Treetops’ counseling and emotional support team on 0115 949 6944 or email therapy@treetopshospice.org.uk. Further information is also available on the Treetops website: www.treetops.org.uk

]]>
Teaching grammar to elementary school children does not improve their writing, study finds https://abilitiesnetworks.org/teaching-grammar-to-elementary-school-children-does-not-improve-their-writing-study-finds/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/teaching-grammar-to-elementary-school-children-does-not-improve-their-writing-study-finds/ Dominic Wyse, lead author of the study and professor of early childhood and primary development at UCL, said: “The lack of impact of grammar instruction on students’ narrative writing raises questions on the extended grammatical specifications which are part of the English National Curriculum. “Currently, English National Curriculum content requires children aged six to seven […]]]>

Dominic Wyse, lead author of the study and professor of early childhood and primary development at UCL, said: “The lack of impact of grammar instruction on students’ narrative writing raises questions on the extended grammatical specifications which are part of the English National Curriculum.

“Currently, English National Curriculum content requires children aged six to seven to learn grammatical terms such as noun phrase, utterance, command and tense.

“Older primary school children need to learn terms such as subordinate clause, adverb, modal verb, active and passive.”

The study also looked at a more interactive approach to studying grammar via an online platform called ‘Englicious’ and although there were some ‘encouraging’ results they again found that it was not there was no statistical improvement in the children’s writing ability.

The children’s writing was tested via a narrative writing test and a sentence generation task.

Speaking to The Telegraph, Prof Wyse said he believed encouraging young children to just sit and write for longer periods could be more beneficial than teaching them “what a name is”.

He said, “My personal view is why do you need to teach young children what a name is? Why do they need to know the definition of a name? I don’t think that’s the most important thing to do at that age.

“There are evidence-based approaches to teaching handwriting that have already been proven to work.

“A very simple solution is to practice writing more, and by that I mean having the ability to sit down and actually write for long periods of time.

“School can often have a lot of exercises and children rarely have the opportunity to plan and write at length.

“Of course they have the opportunity to do so, in history lessons for example. But it would be ironic if in their English classes they didn’t have the opportunity to write.

“Good vocabulary, good imagination”

By the 1960s, the emphasis on grammar was largely dropped from the curriculum and priority was given to “English literature” – the idea being that children would learn grammar as they went.

In 2014, the current curriculum was introduced by Michael Gove, then Secretary of State for Education, and the focus was again on learning grammar.

Debra Myhill, director of creative writing at the University of Exeter, said that in her opinion, the question of whether learning grammar at a young age is beneficial for writing is much more complex. than the study suggests.

She added: “Being a good writer means you need to spell accurately and have grammatical sentences, but it also means you need a good vocabulary, a good imagination and you need to understand narrative structure.

“No single intervention can tackle all of these things at once.”

In the conclusion of the UCL study, the authors write: “Knowledge of language is not entirely synonymous with grammar as currently conceived in the English National Curriculum.

“National curriculum policy makers have selected which curriculum content to cover based on the prioritization of certain types of knowledge at the expense of other types of knowledge.”

The UCL study concluded that the curriculum should focus more on what helps children develop their writing skills at different developmental stages, focusing on teaching approaches such as sentence combination, planning and the emphasis on writing processes.

Professor Wyse said the national curriculum should reflect evidence of the value of teaching grammar in classrooms. He added: “Until a thorough review of the English National Curriculum is undertaken, children are unlikely to receive the optimal evidence-based writing instruction they deserve.”

“Writing for fun”

Adrian Williams, trustee of the Queen’s English Society, said that while learning grammar did not make children “better writers”, it would ensure they wrote “correctly”.

He said, “Let’s see what we mean by ‘better.’

“If we mean ‘more imaginatively, more forcefully, having a greater impact with what they write’, it seems unlikely that learning grammar will improve a child’s ability to to write.

“Indeed, the learning experience may well deter the child from writing for pleasure.

“If, on the contrary, ‘better’ means ‘correctly’, it seems reasonable to expect that children who have learned the grammar and learned the lesson will eventually begin to apply what they have been taught.

“Then they will have the advantage that the people who read what they write will give their writing more respect.

“Or, the other way around, people who write badly run the risk that their writing will elicit scorn from their readers: potential employers, for example.”

]]>
Futsal coaching lessons on cards https://abilitiesnetworks.org/futsal-coaching-lessons-on-cards/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 00:00:44 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/futsal-coaching-lessons-on-cards/ the herald Tadious Manyepo Sports journalist RESPECTED Zimbabwean futsal expert based in England, Philip Zulu, is urging authorities to bring futsal football instructors to deliver coaching courses in the country this month. Zulu made a name for himself as a grassroots football coach in Leeds, England, and has since linked up with the Seychelles Football […]]]>

the herald

Tadious Manyepo Sports journalist

RESPECTED Zimbabwean futsal expert based in England, Philip Zulu, is urging authorities to bring futsal football instructors to deliver coaching courses in the country this month.

Zulu made a name for himself as a grassroots football coach in Leeds, England, and has since linked up with the Seychelles Football Federation where he works as a consultant.

And, touched by the difficult situation of football development in this country, he decided to bring in highly qualified experts to teach Zimbabwean coaches lessons based on the philosophy of futsal.

Futsal is a game based on association football, a variant of mini-football played on a hard court, smaller than a football field, and mainly indoors. It has similarities to five-a-side football and indoor football. Futsal is played between two teams of five players each, one of whom is the goalkeeper.

And Zulu intends to bring Brazilian Junior Roberti to lead the Futsal coaching course in Zimbabwe.

“Yes, we want to set up structures for national grassroots development programmes. Super Eagles Futsal (England’s Zulu team) intends to bring an instructor, who is an excellent coach trainer and also a coach with good experience and exposure in the world’s top futsal leagues, to assist in mentoring training coaches and referees who will lead those instituted leagues,” Zulu said.

“This new development aims to raise awareness to a high degree of awareness by showcasing the huge differences that exist in our traditional way of coaching football, which to a greater extent lags behind in terms of solid and comprehensive training. players to master competitive skills, techniques and creative thought processes.

“We will approach the relevant authorities of the Ministry of Youth, Sports, Arts and Leisure to try to engage them to try to share, dialogue and agree on the planned training program for futsal coaches and its wider implications for fluid, rapid and strategic development trends.

“Our youngsters have been ill-prepared and poorly coached, so development has been negligible. Our primary concern is to foster a high degree of a robust coaching philosophy that brings out intelligence, critical thinking in terms of results d early learning (early childhood development) and the developmental progression of these young children into youth football where we have a host of issues that have decimated our game.

“We lack gravity in designing modules, activities and programs that give our young people the opportunity to learn, train and adapt to the natural rhythm of their growth as they grow into the tender age of 6 to 9 and 10 to 13 during their formative years. progress in their youthful growth patterns. “We are aware of the Covid-19 viral escalation of new variants, so we have taken a wait-and-see approach in trying to pinpoint the right time frame, but we are planning for this month of March.”

]]>
Iowa Republicans forgot that education is about teaching kids https://abilitiesnetworks.org/iowa-republicans-forgot-that-education-is-about-teaching-kids/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 22:07:18 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/iowa-republicans-forgot-that-education-is-about-teaching-kids/ Paul Deton February 24, 2022 4:06 p.m. The elected Republicans who represent me have forgotten the most important thing about education: its vocation is to educate children. On November 9, 2021, U.S. Representative Mariannette Miller-Meeks introduced the CHOICE Act (HR 5959) which is a bill that takes federal money from public schools for private schools […]]]>

The elected Republicans who represent me have forgotten the most important thing about education: its vocation is to educate children.

On November 9, 2021, U.S. Representative Mariannette Miller-Meeks introduced the CHOICE Act (HR 5959) which is a bill that takes federal money from public schools for private schools in states like Iowa. This bill is going nowhere if the Democrats hold a majority.

I asked a group of parents and educators if they had heard of the CHOICE Act. They hadn’t. It is a distraction from the main purpose of educating our children. What is the MP doing?

Miller-Meeks is looking to gain some more Iowa Republican education extremism to garner some votes in the midterm elections.

Iowa State Republicans support discrimination against a class of young children (HF 2416), seek to lock up teachers who don’t do what they want (SF 2198), and play three cards with childcare by doing nothing but increasing the number of children each provider can serve (SF 2268).

No public money should go to private schools. We should focus on educating children, not playing political games with their future.

Paul Deton

solon

]]>
“Kate Middleton has more training in hurling than many young children” https://abilitiesnetworks.org/kate-middleton-has-more-training-in-hurling-than-many-young-children/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 15:22:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/kate-middleton-has-more-training-in-hurling-than-many-young-children/ Liam Griffin has proposals underway to try to tackle the continuing decline in levels of participation in Gaelic games, particularly hurling and camogie. Wexford’s 1996 All-Ireland SHC-winning manager drew up two motions, one to fully identify the problem and the other to begin to fix it. The intention is that they will be on the […]]]>

Liam Griffin has proposals underway to try to tackle the continuing decline in levels of participation in Gaelic games, particularly hurling and camogie.

Wexford’s 1996 All-Ireland SHC-winning manager drew up two motions, one to fully identify the problem and the other to begin to fix it. The intention is that they will be on the Clár of the Annual Congress next year.

Griffin had first been alarmed by ESRI’s 2013 ‘Keeping Them In the Game’ report which showed that the dropout rate for hurling/camogie between the ages of 21 and 26 was 60% and Gaelic football was 70% in due to loss of interest.

He was further disturbed by last year’s study from Sheffield Hallam University commissioned by Sport Ireland, ‘Researching the Value of Sport in Ireland’, which revealed hurling, a game which had been played by 2 % of the Irish population in 2008 while among the top 10 in sporting activities, had dropped out of the top 10 in 2019 – Gaelic football retained its place at 2%. These figures are from the Irish Sports Monitor 2019.

In his work with the Club Players Association, Griffin pointed to these concerning statistics. The first motion passed by his club St Mary’s, Rosslare calls on fixture analysts to conduct an annual survey of turnouts across all codes and levels.

“We need to start collecting intelligence so that we ourselves know what is going on and every club should have a drop-out database. If the GAA people don’t accept the ESRI report or the Sports Council/Sheffield Hallam University report, then we have to produce our own.

“The organization has a responsibility to be responsible for the growth and development of hurling, but what we’re doing isn’t working, we’re not expanding it. There should be a report on each county’s performance against the association’s fundamentals each year. Organize a collection of information rather than no one being held accountable. It’s not unfair to ask that, is it?

The second motion calls for every GAA club to be required to have or establish a hurling crèche for children up to and including 12 years of age. To accommodate football clubs that have a hurling relationship, it will be modified for Wexford’s annual convention at the end of this year.

“If we are truly a Gaelic Athletic Association and truly enjoy hurling and football, we have a responsibility to maintain both sports,” Griffin insists. “All children in the country have the right to play hurling. It’s either part of what we do or it’s not.

“Kate Middleton has had more training in hurling than a lot of young children,” he says in reference to the Duchess of Cambridge’s visit with her husband Prince William to the Salthill-Knocknacarra GAA club in March 2020.

“Muhammad Ali comes to town and gets yelled at. The Chinese vice president is going home with one. That’s all hypocrisy. I don’t want to diminish the point I’m making, but is it wrong to say these things ? ”

In this newspaper in early January, outgoing national director of hurling development Martin Fogarty – whose position has yet to be announced – spoke candidly about the challenges the game faces in non-toggle areas.

“The word I wrote after reading this article was ‘frustration,'” Griffin says. “Are these positions symbolic or is there real bite with the support system underneath to do it? If so, then we’re honest in what we do, but other than that, it’s dishonesty and we’re never going to take hurling outside of the traditional backcountry.

Time and again, Griffin hears gushing compliments about the game, but with little action to exploit its popularity as a spectator sport.

“Why should our great national game be played by less than 2% of the population? Why should we give up the top 10 if we have the best field game? It is often said that this is our position, but is it true or are we kidding ourselves?

“It’s not difficult or awkward, other than to say please can we try to introduce the game to every kid in the country to pick up a hurley and play the game. I am involved in different GAA circles and how many people say they would have loved to play the game but never had the chance, we should give everyone that chance.

]]>
Henman’s coaching is a real hit at Chestnut Park Primary https://abilitiesnetworks.org/henmans-coaching-is-a-real-hit-at-chestnut-park-primary/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 11:35:32 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/henmans-coaching-is-a-real-hit-at-chestnut-park-primary/ Tim Henman, the former UK tennis number 1, visited Chestnut Park Primary School in West Croydon this morning as part of an attendance initiative organized by the Lawn Tennis Association and funded by the former’s charity foundation player. Expert Advice: young Chestnut Grove student gets advice on his forehand from Tim Henman LTA Youth is […]]]>

Tim Henman, the former UK tennis number 1, visited Chestnut Park Primary School in West Croydon this morning as part of an attendance initiative organized by the Lawn Tennis Association and funded by the former’s charity foundation player.

Expert Advice: young Chestnut Grove student gets advice on his forehand from Tim Henman

LTA Youth is an innovative junior program for children aged 4-18, created to help more children experience the benefits of playing and staying in tennis, regardless of age, gender, ability, disability or their origin.

Chestnut Park Primary School is located in one of the most deprived areas in the country. Last year, the school was encouraged by the Tim Henman Foundation and their academic trust, GLF Schools, to adopt the LTA offer of free online teacher training through the LTA Youth Schools program.

The school completed the primary teacher training course and received a £250 voucher, an incentive to take the training, which they chose to use for 10 hours of team teaching with an LTA accredited coach local.

Following this, and to help students continue their tennis journey beyond their PE sessions, the Tim Henman Foundation funded the school’s 592 students to participate in an LTA Youth Start course. , developed as the perfect introductory course for young children who are new to tennis.

LTA Youth Start is delivered by coaches at tennis clubs, parks and other locations across the country, and includes six progressive, fun sessions with a trained LTA Youth Start coach, plus a free tennis racquet, a set of balls and a branded t-shirt for each child.

Today’s event was the third of six LTA Youth Start training sessions that will be delivered to students by coaches through April.

“Sports opportunities in areas that need them the most are what we seek,” Henman said today after leading a Chestnut Park student training session.

Game, set and match : nearly 300 West Croydon primary school pupils benefited from tennis coaching as part of the Henman-supported LTA program

Luke Digweed of the LTA said: “The LTA Youth Schools program is a great opportunity to get students playing and learning through tennis and it’s fantastic that the primary school teachers in Chestnut Park have completed training to open tennis to its students. .

“It’s fantastic that the Tim Henman Foundation has been able to provide Chestnut Park Elementary School with additional funding for students to continue their introduction to tennis through the LTA Youth Start program, and it was great to have Tim to school for this semester.”

Become a patron!


About insidecroydon

News, views and analysis about the people of Croydon, their lives and their political times in London’s diverse and most populous borough. Based in Croydon and edited by Steven Downes. To contact us, please email inside.croydon@btinternet.com

]]>
Animal Crossing teaches pandemic babies what museums are https://abilitiesnetworks.org/animal-crossing-teaches-pandemic-babies-what-museums-are/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 23:05:21 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/animal-crossing-teaches-pandemic-babies-what-museums-are/ Yet another reason why animal crossing has been a bright spot in the pandemic We’ve heard it all our lives: “Video games rot your brain, they’re not productive, they’re a waste of time…” I could go on, but you get the idea. In many cases, however, playing games can be a rewarding experience, especially when […]]]>

Yet another reason why animal crossing has been a bright spot in the pandemic

We’ve heard it all our lives: “Video games rot your brain, they’re not productive, they’re a waste of time…” I could go on, but you get the idea. In many cases, however, playing games can be a rewarding experience, especially when we’re stuck indoors during a global pandemic. I came across a post on Reddit today that kind of blew my mind – a parent posted a heartfelt “thank you” to animal crossing, because the game taught their seven-year-old daughter what a museum is.

They share that their child was five when the pandemic started and hasn’t been to a museum since. When they asked her if she remembered going there, she replied: “Yes, in animal crossing.” Oh my god, I think my heart just melted – it’s both adorable and depressing.

As someone without children, I don’t think much about how the pandemic is affecting children these days, but this was a stark reminder. It’s sad that us adults can’t go to our concerts or our craft breweries or whatever, but kids are missing out on basic life experiences. Yes animal crossing is the only way for kids to know what museums are like today, I’m glad Blathers and his virtual exhibits were able to serve as a substitute for now.

Dear Animal Crossing, thank you for teaching our pandemic kids what a museum is… from animal crossing

If you need a little optimism, the comments on the post are full of other players talking about how THAT taught their young children how loans work or how to identify different types of insects and fish. I never considered Animal Crossing: New Horizons be an educational game, but that’s what makes it the perfect learning tool: families have so much fun playing together, so kids don’t think about everything they’re learning when playing .

Games have been useful tools for learning, community and connection during the pandemic, and animal crossing has been one of the most important titles we’ve played during the pandemic on each of those fronts. There’s a reason the game sold out more than 32 million copies during confinement.

[Featured Image Source: CBR]
]]>
Local educators and leaders participate in social-emotional training | Local News https://abilitiesnetworks.org/local-educators-and-leaders-participate-in-social-emotional-training-local-news/ Tue, 25 Jan 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/local-educators-and-leaders-participate-in-social-emotional-training-local-news/ As part of the STOP School Violence Prevention and Mental Health training program – developed by Kankakee City Life Director Aaron Clark and implemented by Kankakee County State’s Attorney Jim Rowe – the Theraplay Institute began to organize training programs in Kankakee County in 2018. Theraplay is a program designed for trauma-informed schools and follows […]]]>

As part of the STOP School Violence Prevention and Mental Health training program – developed by Kankakee City Life Director Aaron Clark and implemented by Kankakee County State’s Attorney Jim Rowe – the Theraplay Institute began to organize training programs in Kankakee County in 2018.

Theraplay is a program designed for trauma-informed schools and follows the motto “Building community and connections in your school”.

The first time the program was introduced to Kankakee County, it was held at the River Valley Church and attracted 150 attendees – mostly teachers and local leaders – seeking to learn more about teaching and working with social/emotional skills.

The international program stalled locally during the pandemic and resurfaced Monday at Kankakee Community College, where many professionals from the Kankakee 111 school district — as well as coordinators from local nonprofits — participated in the first of both Theraplay sessions.

Clark was on hand to present the program and noted that “Kankakee County is the most educated community in the world. [at Theraplay].”

He introduced the presenter of the day, Kay Schieffer, specialist and certified trainer of the Theraplay group and former special education teacher. Schieffer developed what are called “sun circles” in Theraplay, which are used in classrooms with young children.

“The main goal is to make children feel safe,” she said. “Children can’t learn if they don’t feel safe.”

Program participants have tried a number of activities in which children participate in Theraplay-trained classrooms. This encouraged participants to interact and get to know each other.

Through a variety of activities that allow children to have fun, build relationships and develop social skills, Theraplay has been found to help young students “reduce confrontation or resistance” in the classroom, according to Schieffer.

The program also works with older children and adults who may have experienced trauma and may be conflicted or suspicious as a result.

“We try to build self-regulation before the difficult behaviors happen,” Schieffer said.

Theraplay is a non-clinical intervention, not a treatment, based on developmental theory. Groups are adult-led and structured; are 99% interactive and 1% talking; serve to enhance group functioning and individual learning; serve to build positive relationships and communities; and support positive sense of self, self-regulation and social skills.

The goals of the groups are to create a sense of safety, to give children the space to be excited about an activity, but to learn how to channel that excitement and form appropriate social interactions.

Theraplay is used in 40 countries and is primarily used by educators and leaders of organizations that care for children. The program is described as “a proactive, intensive, relationship-focused intervention” and is based on natural patterns of health interaction between parent and child.

When in a clinical setting (outside the classroom), parents actively participate in the program. Here, the practitioner and the parents work together.

For more information or to schedule an in-person or virtual program, visit theraplay.org.

]]>