school students – Abilities Networks http://abilitiesnetworks.org/ Sat, 16 Apr 2022 23:23:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-4.png school students – Abilities Networks http://abilitiesnetworks.org/ 32 32 Teachers ‘straining under pressure’ from student mental health crisis | Education https://abilitiesnetworks.org/teachers-straining-under-pressure-from-student-mental-health-crisis-education/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/teachers-straining-under-pressure-from-student-mental-health-crisis-education/ Schools and teachers are ‘straining under pressure’ to support the growing number of school children developing mental health problems such as anxiety and depression, experts say. Despite being the people students turn to most often when in distress, teachers are hampered in their desire to help by the profession’s widespread lack of training in dealing […]]]>

Schools and teachers are ‘straining under pressure’ to support the growing number of school children developing mental health problems such as anxiety and depression, experts say.

Despite being the people students turn to most often when in distress, teachers are hampered in their desire to help by the profession’s widespread lack of training in dealing with mental health issues. .

The huge barriers many families in England face in getting help for their son or daughter from NHS Child and Young People‘s Mental Health Services (CAMHS) is putting pressure on schools, say a group of education and health experts writing in the journal of the Royal Society of Medicine.

“The growing health needs of children are currently not being met by the health sector. Schools and teachers provide vital support, but they cave under the pressure of the demands placed on them,” they say.

“The mental health of children and young people in England, and the services designed to support them, are in a dire state,” they add. While rates of mental illness among under-18s have halved in the past three years, “supply is nowhere near enough to meet need”.

Only one in four of the 500,000 children and young people referred to CAMHS each year receive help as services are stretched, and many are denied care because they are not deemed sick enough.

The authors include Chloe Lowry from the UCL Institute of Education in London, Lisa-Maria Müller and Alison Peacock from the Chartered College of Teaching and Anant Jani from the Institute of Global Health at the University of Heidelberg in Germany. Schools should receive NHS funding to help them train teachers to meet growing needs, they argue.

Teachers’ in-depth knowledge and regular interaction with their students means that they are “not only the first port of call when things go wrong, but for many the only port of call”. Surveys show that children and young people turn to them for help more often than to their own families. Teachers are considered, alongside GPs and social workers, as part of the first level of support from CAMHS.

“It is therefore both astonishing and alarming that teachers in England are not adequately trained for these roles,” the authors write. Only one teacher per school in England receives mental health awareness training.

Despite being Level 1 CAMHS professionals, only 40% of teachers feel equipped to teach children in their class with mental health needs and only 32% knew which organizations outside the school could help students , according to a government report in 2016.

“While schools and colleges are doing all they can for students, the fact remains that the lack of support and provision of mental health services for children and young people has been a persistent problem for the past many years,” said Dr. Mary Bousted, Joint Chief Executive Officer. secretary of the NEU, the main teachers’ union. Covid made the situation worse, she added.

“Workload, lack of external support, insufficient staff to work on pastoral issues and training are all huge barriers to students getting the support they need and should expect. .”

Consultant clinical psychologist Dr Nihara Krause said teachers need to have specialist mental health services they can refer students to as students present with increasingly complex problems.

“Schools should provide basic mental health training to all staff, have specialist trained teachers, have support for staff to share challenges they may face in their students and themselves, [and] have clear school policies and procedures on dealing with students with different mental health issues,” Krause added.

A government spokesperson said: ‘We are supporting teachers to help children and young people recover from the emotional impact of the pandemic, including providing training for key mental health officers in every school and college public by 2025.

“To support pupils with more complex needs, we have also invested an additional £79 million to expand children’s mental health services and accelerate the deployment of mental health support teams, which will enable almost three million children in England have access to health experts at school or college. by April 2024.”

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MSU’s Waller Receives President’s Distinguished Teaching Award | MSUToday https://abilitiesnetworks.org/msus-waller-receives-presidents-distinguished-teaching-award-msutoday/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 22:17:58 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/msus-waller-receives-presidents-distinguished-teaching-award-msutoday/ A Michigan State University faculty member known for his scholarship, commitment and innovation in the classroom recently received the university’s highest teaching honor during a surprise visit to class of university leaders and colleagues. To enthusiastic applause, MSU President Samuel L. Stanley Jr., MD, presented the 2022 President’s Distinguished Teaching Award to John Waller, associate […]]]>

A Michigan State University faculty member known for his scholarship, commitment and innovation in the classroom recently received the university’s highest teaching honor during a surprise visit to class of university leaders and colleagues.

To enthusiastic applause, MSU President Samuel L. Stanley Jr., MD, presented the 2022 President’s Distinguished Teaching Award to John Waller, associate professor of the history of medicine. Stanley was joined by Vice Provost Mark Largent, College of Social Sciences Dean Mary Finn, Associate Dean Walter Hawthorne and others.

“Supporting the success of our students is MSU’s most critical mission, and it is brilliantly reflected every day by our world-class faculty in their classrooms and beyond,” Stanley said. “I am proud to convey the university’s esteem for such an exemplary researcher and teacher as Dr. Waller with this award. And it’s so appropriate to announce it like this, in front of his students.

The annual award recognizes faculty who demonstrate, among other qualities, energy and enthusiasm for engaging students and empowering them to embrace change, extend learning beyond the classroom, and influence others to improve their teaching by sharing their knowledge.

“I’m very touched and honored and slightly embarrassed,” Waller joked to laughter from his students and visitors, jokingly steadying himself in a nearby chair. Calling the honor a group effort, Waller singled out the contributions of Jenn Arbogast, the academic specialist he says was “absolutely instrumental” in building his flagship program, the Social Science Researchers Programsince its creation in 2013.

Waller has built an impressive career of teaching, scholarship, and publishing. Specializing in the history of medicine, he has published seven books that explore the nature of scientific discovery, the lives of child factory workers in the 19th century, the history of American medicine, and the mass psychogenic illness expressed by compulsive dancing in the 16th century, among other subjects. Waller holds a bachelor’s degree in modern history, a master’s degree in human biology, another master’s degree in the history of science and medicine, and a doctorate in the history and philosophy of science.

Hawthorne, who oversees Waller’s work in the Social Scientist Program, cited in his appointment letter Waller’s energy and enthusiasm, ability to translate complex ideas, impressive appraisals and accolades, its interdisciplinarity and commitment to diversity, among other traits.

“Waller sees lessons in the ‘traditional’ classroom as a step toward empowering students to shape their own lives and impact the lives of others,” Hawthorne said. “Through lectures and seminars, it inspires students to tackle big ideas and ways to meet the world’s great challenges.”

The Social Science Scholars Program recruits approximately 20 promising high school students to take one interdisciplinary seminar per semester for two years in a group setting, participate in a study abroad program, and complete an internship.

“The Social Scientist Program, and his leadership within it, is one of the defining characteristics of our college,” Finn said. “Each year, we are excited to see what will come out of the program. Dr. Waller embodies what a scholar-teacher can be.

The program is a compendium of Waller’s pedagogical approach: participatory, intellectually humble and tirelessly curious. In addition to being available in class, Waller is known for his home consultations with students on essays, grants, and research, often late into the evening. Waller has been particularly successful in encouraging his students to fight for and win prestigious national and international awards.

Per tradition and the stipulations of the award, the President confers the President’s Distinguished Teaching Award during unannounced classroom visits. Stanley’s group was joined by retired economics professor Carl Liedholm, who created the endowed prize with his wife, Margaret. Liedholm said it was crucial that the president “get down on the factory floor” and present the award himself – which Stanley clearly liked.

“I really appreciate the chance to see you all,” Stanley told Waller’s class. “It really validates the choice to be here in person with you when I see your excitement and enthusiasm for John to receive this award.”

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The online and offline teaching model seems to burn out many teachers https://abilitiesnetworks.org/the-online-and-offline-teaching-model-seems-to-burn-out-many-teachers/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 18:10:09 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/the-online-and-offline-teaching-model-seems-to-burn-out-many-teachers/ It’s another crazy day for Raga Ravi, a math and social science teacher, after the school she works for recently reopened for hybrid learning – a mix of in-person and online instruction. She has students divided into two groups who come to school every other day, in addition to some who have opted for the […]]]>

It’s another crazy day for Raga Ravi, a math and social science teacher, after the school she works for recently reopened for hybrid learning – a mix of in-person and online instruction.

She has students divided into two groups who come to school every other day, in addition to some who have opted for the online mode.

“The management of my class V students is chaotic; many have forgotten the class etiquette as they attend physical classes after two long years,” she says. If they don’t get his attention, they get restless and distract the class.

“I turned off the mute option for students taking math lessons from home because it is difficult to juggle students in person and online,” says the middle school teacher who is racing against time to complete the program.

In accordance with the school’s rule, the “chat” is not open to students, so those taking home lessons must wait their turn patiently.

Her biggest challenge is giving adequate attention and support to both groups. “If I start managing students in class, online students get bored, but there’s not much we can do about it,” Raga says.

She says the kids in the class complain when videos are played on the laptop. “We can’t go to the screening room every time to make sure a video is viewed clearly by both groups,” she says.

Network issues have plagued students at an ICSE school ever since teachers began taking classes at the school while students were parked in line.

A math lesson in progress for class IV students is interrupted with the teacher adjusting the angle of the camera to ensure the students can see the geometry figures drawn on the blackboard. Added to this is the incessant chatter of the children: ‘Maam, your voice is breaking’.

Parents of children who have opted for online lessons say that with many students going to school, those attending home are less heard and some even feel left out.

“My son was complaining that for a quiz conducted in class, the teacher only asked students who were present in person,” says Subha M, whose children who study at a private school in Mylapore insisted that they attend the quiz. physical lessons.

Initially, the loud voice of some teachers was a distraction for the children. “But I had to make it clear to them that it was to make sure everyone could listen to it,” says Subha.

The children, who are out of town because of their parents’ remote work, say they have little choice of schools.

“Forget clarifying questions from students taking online classes, a few teachers don’t even bother to turn on the smart board so we can see the class,” says Raksha (name changed), whose parents plan to send only after she has taken the vaccine.

Frustration with blended learning is growing, especially in schools that have huge classes to manage and are forced to offer both options.

“Teachers are exhausted by this format and we only hope that such a method of teaching and learning will not last in the long term. Either it has to be entirely online or entirely in person,” says Purushothaman, Founder and Senior Director of Everwin Group of Schools.

At school, teachers start their day with online lessons from 8 a.m. to 8:45 p.m., then physical lessons begin for staff. Pupils at home receive educational videos and later in the evening teachers meet online for doubt clarification lessons.

“As we are at the end of the school year, we can only motivate and inspire teachers to keep going a little longer,” says Purushothaman, adding that teachers are bound to rise to the occasion.

Agreeing that the hybrid model is a challenge teachers need to adapt to, Sudha Mahesh, head of CampusK, an international school in Cambridge, says schools need to have a different strategy for each class.

“For Standards I and II, we started classes in a staggered fashion by calling them two or three times a week and on the remaining days they go online,” says Sudha. The lesson plans are organized by class.

She agrees that this was possible because the class size is between 20 and 25 students.

For classes III to VI, the school has designed a common timetable for students online and offline. “It took a while for teachers to figure out how to place the laptop or whether to use a Bluetooth and walk around so the voice was uninterrupted or sit in a way that ensured eye contact with all the students. “, explains Sudha.

Being heard is a big concern for teachers. “Instead of watching a classroom session, I was logging into Microsoft Teams to offer feedback to teachers. Some teachers needed to connect the speaker to the system or needed Bluetooth,” she says.

Sudha says technology support plays an important role and principals need to support teachers. “We, for example, increased the bandwidth when classes were to be broadcast live,” she says.

The power of communication plays an important role in such a format.

“Beyond class III, most parents are not with the children and you have to tell them. We started the “Learning from Home” material in which we developed a list of items that a child should have when attending a class.

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Henman’s coaching is a real hit at Chestnut Park Primary https://abilitiesnetworks.org/henmans-coaching-is-a-real-hit-at-chestnut-park-primary/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 11:35:32 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/henmans-coaching-is-a-real-hit-at-chestnut-park-primary/ Tim Henman, the former UK tennis number 1, visited Chestnut Park Primary School in West Croydon this morning as part of an attendance initiative organized by the Lawn Tennis Association and funded by the former’s charity foundation player. Expert Advice: young Chestnut Grove student gets advice on his forehand from Tim Henman LTA Youth is […]]]>

Tim Henman, the former UK tennis number 1, visited Chestnut Park Primary School in West Croydon this morning as part of an attendance initiative organized by the Lawn Tennis Association and funded by the former’s charity foundation player.

Expert Advice: young Chestnut Grove student gets advice on his forehand from Tim Henman

LTA Youth is an innovative junior program for children aged 4-18, created to help more children experience the benefits of playing and staying in tennis, regardless of age, gender, ability, disability or their origin.

Chestnut Park Primary School is located in one of the most deprived areas in the country. Last year, the school was encouraged by the Tim Henman Foundation and their academic trust, GLF Schools, to adopt the LTA offer of free online teacher training through the LTA Youth Schools program.

The school completed the primary teacher training course and received a £250 voucher, an incentive to take the training, which they chose to use for 10 hours of team teaching with an LTA accredited coach local.

Following this, and to help students continue their tennis journey beyond their PE sessions, the Tim Henman Foundation funded the school’s 592 students to participate in an LTA Youth Start course. , developed as the perfect introductory course for young children who are new to tennis.

LTA Youth Start is delivered by coaches at tennis clubs, parks and other locations across the country, and includes six progressive, fun sessions with a trained LTA Youth Start coach, plus a free tennis racquet, a set of balls and a branded t-shirt for each child.

Today’s event was the third of six LTA Youth Start training sessions that will be delivered to students by coaches through April.

“Sports opportunities in areas that need them the most are what we seek,” Henman said today after leading a Chestnut Park student training session.

Game, set and match : nearly 300 West Croydon primary school pupils benefited from tennis coaching as part of the Henman-supported LTA program

Luke Digweed of the LTA said: “The LTA Youth Schools program is a great opportunity to get students playing and learning through tennis and it’s fantastic that the primary school teachers in Chestnut Park have completed training to open tennis to its students. .

“It’s fantastic that the Tim Henman Foundation has been able to provide Chestnut Park Elementary School with additional funding for students to continue their introduction to tennis through the LTA Youth Start program, and it was great to have Tim to school for this semester.”

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About insidecroydon

News, views and analysis about the people of Croydon, their lives and their political times in London’s diverse and most populous borough. Based in Croydon and edited by Steven Downes. To contact us, please email inside.croydon@btinternet.com

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The government will provide free NEET and JEE coaching https://abilitiesnetworks.org/the-government-will-provide-free-neet-and-jee-coaching/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 18:30:38 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/the-government-will-provide-free-neet-and-jee-coaching/ In a bid to provide special support to students studying in Delhi government run schools, AAP government has decided to provide free tutoring to science students for the preparation of NEET, JEE entrance exams and courses paramedics. The government has partnered with the expert organization “Avanti Fellows” to prepare students for these entrance exams. An […]]]>

In a bid to provide special support to students studying in Delhi government run schools, AAP government has decided to provide free tutoring to science students for the preparation of NEET, JEE entrance exams and courses paramedics.

The government has partnered with the expert organization “Avanti Fellows” to prepare students for these entrance exams. An estimated 6,000 students seeking careers in engineering, medicine and other technical fields will benefit from free first-year tutoring.

Speaking about the initiative, Deputy Chief Minister and Minister of Education Manish Sisodia said the free tutoring for entrance exams will fulfill every child’s dream of becoming a doctor, engineer and researcher. High training fees will no longer be a reason to give up on their dreams, he said.

“The government is committed to fulfilling the dreams of children studying in Delhi’s public schools, providing them with world-class quality education. The Delhi government has launched several ambitious projects to increase the access of public school students to technical and medical education,” the government said in a statement. Talking about the Delhi government’s new initiative to prepare students for the future, Sisodia said many children dream of pursuing higher education in the best medical or engineering institutions to become Doctors of Engineering.

Sisodia added that with this government step, thousands of future medical engineers, scientists, STEM experts, etc. will now be prepared in the public schools of Delhi, which will make India proud globally. The Delhi government is committed to promoting equitable access to higher education opportunities in science and technology and this free coaching program will prove to be an important step in that direction, he said.

In this sense, the Directorate of Education of the Government of NCT Delhi has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with ‘Avanti Fellows’, an expert organization in this field, to prepare students for the entrance examination for technical education courses like JEE, NEET, paramedic, etc., he says.

In the first year of the program, 6,000 selected children in grades 11-12 from all public schools in Delhi will be provided with free coaching in preparing for various entrance exams, through rounds of tests , the academic support needed for these exams and regular mentoring during preparation. .

Previously, this free coaching program had been introduced in a few schools, on a pilot basis, and the results were excellent. More than 160 girls in the ST/SC category are benefiting from free NEET coaching by experts, under this program.

Currently, more than 30,000 students are enrolled in science streams in all public schools in Delhi. Free Test Prep Program will help these students gain admission into top graduate programs and degree courses in STEM, Engineering, MBBS/BDS, Pharmacy, Nursing, Courses paramedics and research programs.

In the first year of the program, 6,000 children in grades 11-12 from all public schools in Delhi will be selected and given free coaching to prepare for various entrance exams, through rounds of tests , the academic support necessary for these exams and regular mentoring during preparation.

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Vision 2022: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Mentorship Program | Vision https://abilitiesnetworks.org/vision-2022-dr-martin-luther-king-jr-mentorship-program-vision/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 06:30:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/vision-2022-dr-martin-luther-king-jr-mentorship-program-vision/ Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Mentorship Program The PA 21st Learning Center, operated by the Meadville Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Scholarship Fund, is located at Meadville Area Middle School. The program, which serves seventh and eighth graders, is a collaboration between the Crawford Central School District, Allegheny College, and Meadville Dr. Martin Luther King […]]]>

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Mentorship Program

The PA 21st Learning Center, operated by the Meadville Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Scholarship Fund, is located at Meadville Area Middle School. The program, which serves seventh and eighth graders, is a collaboration between the Crawford Central School District, Allegheny College, and Meadville Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Scholarship Board. The program received an outstanding rating from the Pennsylvania Department of Education’s Office of Academic Support. He is greatly supported by the director, teachers and staff of MAMS. Its mission is to strengthen the academic and personal development of middle school students by offering them opportunities for lifelong success.

The goals of the program are to help students master their classes, develop workplace skills, provide character and community building activities that promote positive social interactions, maintain a connection with teachers and parents to keep them informed of student progress.

The program operates Monday through Thursday from 3:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. during the school year and in the summer for five weeks, Monday through Thursday from 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Safe transportation and nutritional snacks are provided. Parents participate in the decision-making process and are engaged in the program; they can enroll their children in the program at any time.

Programs offered include academic enrichment in English, math and science, one-on-one tutoring, drama, leadership, watershed STEM, nutrition and exercise, workforce readiness/ to career/college, character building/coping skills and CPR/AED/First Aid/Child CPR Certification. Community leaders visit from time to time to share their career paths.

Performance measures must exceed local and national academic standards, show improved school attendance, show improved classroom performance, and demonstrate additional positive educational, social, and behavioral changes.

Staff represent our amazing community and state which includes Acutec, K-12 Education Alliance, Watershed STEM, Women’s Services, Academy Theatre, French Creek Conservancy, Plaza Lane Bowling and PHEAA.

Now in its 11th year, the program has seen the success of its students who have participated in the mentorship program.

Our vision is to ensure that the program is sustainable over the years. For more information about the learning center, please contact the middle school at (814) 333-1188.

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Launching an online school to help parents teach their children from home https://abilitiesnetworks.org/launching-an-online-school-to-help-parents-teach-their-children-from-home/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 22:02:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/launching-an-online-school-to-help-parents-teach-their-children-from-home/ Thursday, January 20, 2022, 11:02 a.m.Press release: Spectrum Academy A new online school for Kiwi children called Spectrum Academy opens enrollment today with parents and caregivers eager to teach their children at home. Karen Tui Boyes, managing director of Wellington-based Spectrum Education Limited and founder of Spectrum Academy, said the online school would appeal to […]]]>

A new online school for Kiwi children called Spectrum Academy opens enrollment today with parents and caregivers eager to teach their children at home.

Karen Tui Boyes, managing director of Wellington-based Spectrum Education Limited and founder of Spectrum Academy, said the online school would appeal to a wide range of students from kindergarten to year 13.

“The response to homeschooling needs has been overwhelming. We received hundreds of requests during the Christmas holidays. Parents are looking for change and different ways to meet the educational needs of their children. We provide this solution by offering support and guidance on how to teach their children in a fun, relevant and practical way,” says Karen.

Spectrum Academy learning coaches are fully qualified and experienced New Zealand teachers, who partner with parents to deliver the New Zealand curriculum while developing a personalized, flexible and forward-looking education plan for the students.

“Parents can expect a high level of online coaching delivery and positive results for students of all ages through our approach. We match each child and family with one of our learning coaches. They work together to develop an age-appropriate educational experience tied to the child’s curiosities, unique talents, and personal goals. Our overarching goal for all students is to help them enter the career of their choice suited to their strengths and interests or to undertake higher education.

“Our coaching schedule is flexible to accommodate each family. For example, most teens regularly need around 8-10 hours of sleep to maintain optimal health and daytime alertness. ‘they start their learning at 10 a.m., as long as they get the job done, that’s what matters,” says Karen. “Class sizes will be limited to 15 students, with frequent opportunities to receive one-on-one support and breakout sessions.”

Workplaces are increasingly offering work-from-home options for busy parents to help balance parenting and work. Karen says parents need to have realistic expectations for their children’s accomplishments when working from home.

“Working online presents many challenges, and as experienced teachers and experts in our field, we know precisely what workload and achievement is required for students. Parents who work from home also have the option of a learning coach spending more time with a child to free up a working parent,” she says.

The contact time with coaching is different for each student. For younger students, contact time may be three to five hours a day, while high school students may only have 30 minutes to an hour with their coach.

The school year is based on 40 weeks of learning, equivalent to the public school system. There are also opt-in modules during the summer holidays, as well as the possibility for parents to take a two-week break at the end of each learning cycle if they wish.

Creating a school that goes beyond the mainstream education system has been Karen’s dream for over 27 years.

“We adopt the 16 habits of mind as the basis for teaching and learning. Our students will learn to behave intelligently. It’s about knowing what to do when you’re not sure what to do next or you don’t know the answer. Future-oriented learning is not just about gathering information. It’s about knowing how to act on it, knowing what questions to ask, and being able to think critically content and origin,” says Karen.

© Scoop Media

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Supervision of disabled students | Cashmere amount https://abilitiesnetworks.org/supervision-of-disabled-students-cashmere-amount/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 15:56:23 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/supervision-of-disabled-students-cashmere-amount/ [ad_1] Teaching specially disabled students is no ordinary job, but requires immense “courage, patience and dedication” to help them grow, according to Kashmir-based Inclusive Educators (IEs). There is, however, a dearth of such teachers in Kashmir, but many of them still mark the lives of hundreds of these children. Cashmere amount main correspondent Riyaz Bhat […]]]>


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Teaching specially disabled students is no ordinary job, but requires immense “courage, patience and dedication” to help them grow, according to Kashmir-based Inclusive Educators (IEs). There is, however, a dearth of such teachers in Kashmir, but many of them still mark the lives of hundreds of these children.

Cashmere amount main correspondent Riyaz Bhat spoke to some of the special tutors who shared their experience as a guide and mentor for students with disabilities.

Assiya Kousar

Inclusive education tutor Samagra Shiksha

Kousar says that on average, special needs educators visit homes of at least 2-3 specially disabled students that they have identified for inclusive education (EI).

“Among these, there are students who cannot be educated and therefore we do the ‘follow-ups’. We explain to their parents how they can try to get their pupils to understand some of the basic things like daily activities, life and ideals. Kousar said

Kousar, 29, says that in the Budgam area, the government has set up a resource room in Ompora in which at least six students with disabilities are enrolled.

“Although IE students have different levels of disability, we need to teach each student individually,” she said.

Kousar also says that the way of teaching specially able students is entirely different and requires a lot of patience and love for them to understand everything being taught to them.

“We usually show pictures or models to silent students. They have to do picture reading. However, for visually impaired students we use braille script, ”she said.

Braille is a tactile writing system used by visually impaired people, including people who are blind, deafblind or visually impaired. It can be read either on embossed paper or using updatable braille displays that connect to computers and smartphones.

Kousar has been teaching students with disabilities since 2017. “So far, I have taught at least 20 students with different types of disabilities.”

She said, “In Budgam district, at least 137 of these students are enrolled, among whom more than 80 students can train through IE, but the staff is very weak.

Kousar also says that at least three different students have left private schools and enrolled in our EI resource room.

Sabreen zahra

Inclusive education tutor Samagra Shiksha

For Sabreen Zahra, 30, teaching students with disabilities takes a lot of courage and hard work, along with an Honors Bachelor of Education degree.

“We can’t do that with a normal B.Ed or Post Graduation (PG),” she said.

Originally from the Hawal district of Srinagar city, Zahra says that Samagra Shiksha has dedicated a special resource room for this purpose in each area of ​​the district.

“I also have a resource room at the Nawakadal Boys Upper Secondary School. We don’t have exact data on students with disabilities because every now and then a new special child is enrolled, ”she said.

Zahra said: “For special lessons and to fill the gap, students usually come for special lessons, special lessons and sometimes, whenever they have problems on a particular topic or need help. special attention, assistance or advice, they visit us two or three times a year in my resource room.

The inclusive special tutor Zahra says that Samagra Shiksha has many special teachers working in Srinagar.

Students with special abilities receive lessons from different teachers specializing in different fields.

Zahra is specialized in B.Ed Specialized Education Intellectual Handicap. “In addition, inclusive teachers should undergo special training provided by Samagra Shiksha where they learn sign language for deaf and dumb students, braille training for blind students and other classes for students with hearing disabilities. delay in speaking. “

“Physically handicapped students with motor disabilities receive special help in special education in resource rooms and for special physiotherapy, they are referred to the Composite Research Center (CRC) Bemina to fill these types of gaps”, he said. she declared.

She also says, “Currently, I teach six to eight special students who regularly attend special classes in my resource room. “

Sharing the successes of her students, Zahra said, “One of the deaf and dumb students recently passed her 10th grade and another upper secondary student from Soura also got decent marks on her 12th jury exams. “

She says being a special teacher is totally different and difficult from a normal teacher. “In addition to special training, we need to have a caliber, a potential and, most importantly, this mindset to teach such students. “

Zahra also says it takes a lot of determination to teach special students.

“To make them understand a single alphabet, it sometimes takes days together. Whereas for students with poor comprehension skills it can take weeks or even months, and only then is an assessment or reassessment possible, ”she said.

Zahra said, “We create Individualized Educational Programs (IEPs) for a special duration and this requires different tools and techniques based on the potential of the child. “

In Srinagar, nine teachers work for inclusive education, five of whom are special education teachers and four are resource persons.

The resource persons work for the elementary level up to the 8th standard and the teachers in special education work for the secondary level of 9 to 12 classes.

Nazia hurra

Volunteer tutor for CWSN

In an effort to help disabled children, Nazia Hurra did not accept the same fate of being illiterate as her three siblings and became the first in her family to pursue an education.

Hurra, 30, says she wants to help students who need inclusive education to compete with normal students.

Currently, Hurra is a special tutor and teaches at least 20 disabled students in the Bandipora district of northern Kashmir.

“We are three sisters and one brother, and in my family poverty has forced my siblings out of school. However, for me there was no way to step back and accept the same fate as theirs, ”said Hurra.

Originally from Naidkhai Village in Hajin Block of Bandipora District, Hurra said she started doing social work at home helping her specially disabled nephew who was born blind and mentally disabled.

“My journey of helping students with disabilities started at home where I have a blind and mentally disabled nephew. He always wanted to study like normal students and that’s where I started my new journey of helping children with special needs (CWSN), ”she said.

Hurra says her family were worried about her nephew’s education because they had no idea how to write braille for the blind.

“I started working with an NGO, the National Association of the Blind, in which I worked as a volunteer. Later I learned the Braille script on my own. I started working with this NGO as a specialist teacher in the field, ”she said.

Hurra says that initially she identified students who needed inclusive education. “In Bandipora district, I had identified around 20 children who needed inclusive education. I taught them and two of them were selected at Aligarh Special School, ”she said.

“In addition to two other specially disabled students I taught qualified the 10th standard,” she said.

Hurra says that in Jammu and Kashmir, the government as well as private educational institutions lack basic infrastructure.

“There is a need for more special tutors here and more importantly, the infrastructure should be built for the CWSN,” she said.

Javaid ahmed tak

Laureate Padma Shri, godmother of the JK disabled association and special tutor

Almost every two years, a survey is conducted to find out how many Children with Special Needs (CwSN) are enrolled.

“In most districts of Jammu and Kashmir, more than 4000 CWSNs are enrolled in inclusive education,” explains Javaid Ahmad Tak.

He said: “In Jammu and Kashmir, only 58 special education teachers were recruited in 2012. Currently, only around 80 special education teachers are working to teach students with different disabilities.

In a wheelchair, Tak says he’s been associated with the Zeba-Apa Institute for Children with Disabilities since 2006.

“At this institute, over 100 students with disabilities are enrolled and are taught by the special tutors we have hired at Composite Research Center (CRC) Bemina,” Tak said.

Tak has been working as a special tutor since 2006 and has taught over 100 students with different abilities.

Earlier this year, in Nov-08, Tak received the Padma Shri Award from President Ram Nath Kovind in New Delhi.

Tak said the secret behind receiving the Padma Shri Award was the struggle of people with disabilities which inspired him to work for the social good of all those people who sail the same boat.

Recalling the ordeal of two decades ago, Tak said: “On the night of March 21-22, 1997, I was at my uncle’s house and an unknown gunman burst in and shot me in the back in which one of my kidneys, part of the liver, and a spleen were damaged.

Tak received a postgraduate degree in social work from the University of Kashmir.

He said that since then he has been serving people with disabilities and after three years in 2000 he founded an NGO Humanity Welfare Organization Helpline for the welfare of the poor and the disabled.

Umza Majid

Special educator at the Baramula School for the Blind

Uzma Majid was only 21 years old when she decided to devote her services to serving children with disabilities.

Posted at a school for the blind in Baramulla district, north Kashmir, Uzma says she has been working for inclusive education since 2016.

The 27-year-old special tutor, Uzma, said: “I have been working on inclusive education and now I am working in a school for the blind in Baramulla where different types of pupils are enrolled such as the mentally retarded pupils (MR), deaf and dumb pupils and blind pupils respectively. . “

“In the school at least 83 students are enrolled and I teach 8th grade students,” she said.

Originally from the Delina region of Baramulla, Uzma said: “I mainly teach partially blind students using braille writing and in my classroom at least eight of these students are enrolled.

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Calfee Training School Added to Virginia Historic Landmark (Copy) | Local news https://abilitiesnetworks.org/calfee-training-school-added-to-virginia-historic-landmark-copy-local-news/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/calfee-training-school-added-to-virginia-historic-landmark-copy-local-news/ [ad_1] Robert Freis The Roanoke Times The Calfee Training School, a 20th century building associated with the African American history of Pulaski County, has been added to the prestigious Virginia Historic Landmarks Register. The State Department of Historic Resources announced Thursday that the educational site has been added to the registry, a list of places […]]]>


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Robert Freis The Roanoke Times

The Calfee Training School, a 20th century building associated with the African American history of Pulaski County, has been added to the prestigious Virginia Historic Landmarks Register.

The State Department of Historic Resources announced Thursday that the educational site has been added to the registry, a list of places of historical, architectural, archaeological and cultural significance.

According to the VDH, the training school building on Corbin-Harmon Drive in Pulaski dates from 1939, when it was built with federal funding from the Public Works Administration.

The separate elementary school catered for African American children.

It closed in 1966 when Pulaski County desegregated its public school system and reopened in 1968 as a Pulaski Integrated Elementary School for kindergarten students. It closed permanently in 2010.

A planned African American history, education and community center at the site will receive $ 160,000 from a state fund that was previously used for land conservation.

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The Virginia Outdoors Foundation announced in 2020 that Calfee Training School and TG Howard Community Center have received grants from its Open Space Lands Preservation Trust Fund.

After laws governing the Preservation Trust Fund were amended earlier this year by the General Assembly, the foundation’s board of directors adopted the broader mission of supporting community outdoor recreation and education. .

The downtown Pulaski school and community center have each received funding that will be used to help restore what is described as “the centerpiece of a potential African American historic district.”

Founded in the late 1800s to educate black children, Calfee School will be renovated into a museum and daycare. Plans also call for offices and an event center in the 13,000 square foot building.

A lawsuit to secure educational equality for the school’s students was one of the legal victories that led to the landmark Brown v. Board of Education in 1954. The school building was then used by various public and private tenants before closing in 2010.

African-American high school students in Pulaski County were forced to travel to Montgomery County daily and attend the Christiansburg Institute, as were other blacks in the New River Valley in search of public education. The order of the public school desegregation court also put an end to this system of racial discrimination.

On adjacent land, the TG Howard Community Center was established by a black minister in the early 1960s, when the local YMCA was still separate. It quickly became the focal point for African American recreation, political events, education, and vocational training before closing in 2013.

The Calfee Colonial Revival style one-story training school, built to standardized plans provided by the Virginia Board of Education, reflects the desire of state and federal governments to improve facilities and programs for ‘teaching’, declared the VDH, announcing the new historic designation of the school.

Among the 12 other sites listed on the Virginia Landmarks Register are properties that are home to Southside Virginia’s oldest continuously operating radio station, the country’s oldest horse show, and, in West Virginia, the first and possibly the only national forest recreation area for African Americans during apartheid, which was located in Alleghany County.

The Commonwealth Historical Resources Council approved the Virginia Landmarks Register lists at its quarterly public meeting on December 9.

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students from the West of Lyon gain teaching experience | News https://abilitiesnetworks.org/students-from-the-west-of-lyon-gain-teaching-experience-news/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 23:00:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/students-from-the-west-of-lyon-gain-teaching-experience-news/ [ad_1] INWOOD — Working with elementary school students is what Tory Ulmer, a junior at Lycée Ouest de Lyon, looks forward to three times a week. “Their family life stories and fun classroom moments are amazing,” said Ulmer, one of 13 Wildcats enrolled in Kristin Rockhill’s Introductory Education course this semester. Rockhill began offering the […]]]>


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INWOOD — Working with elementary school students is what Tory Ulmer, a junior at Lycée Ouest de Lyon, looks forward to three times a week.

“Their family life stories and fun classroom moments are amazing,” said Ulmer, one of 13 Wildcats enrolled in Kristin Rockhill’s Introductory Education course this semester.

Rockhill began offering the course in 2018, when its university department – Family and Consumer Sciences – began to focus more on identifying and meeting professional and community needs in the district.

“We wanted to have a class that focuses on teaching as a career because a lot of kids in our area are going into teaching, but they just don’t have the opportunity to work on those skills at the high school level.” Rockhill said.

The Introductory Education course therefore gives students a glimpse into the life of an educator while providing them with a real-life experience in the classroom. It also helps students decide whether or not they want to pursue a teaching degree after high school.

The class, which is offered to sophomores, juniors and seniors, meets every day of the school week. There are no prerequisite courses that students must take; However, Rockhill would prefer students to have completed Child Development I and II before enrolling in Intro to Education if that fits their schedule.

During the first quarter of the semester, Intro to Education students learn about different careers in education, how to create lesson plans, and how diverse educational environments can be.

Then, on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays of the second term, students spend the class period working with other teachers in the district.

“They’re pretty much the teacher’s shadow. Sometimes the teachers – if the student is comfortable – they just throw them up and say, “Hey, take this bunch of kids.” In some classrooms, they take the students and do private lessons with them, ”said Rockhill.

Students also create bulletin boards for their designated teachers’ classrooms and end the semester by teaching an entire lesson on their own.

On days when there is no class, students are back in the Rockhill room where she runs organized classes or brings in staff from West Lyon to talk to the class about other related careers. to education that does not involve teaching.

Not all Rockhill students seek to become teachers, but they still benefit from the Introduction to Education as it gives them experience of working with people.

“If you wanted to be a pastor, if you wanted to be an activity coordinator – any kind of career that works with other people, this class will serve that purpose and give you those professional skills,” Rockhill said.

Madisyn Newborg, for example, aspires to become a medical assistant but wanted to take the course to learn how to communicate better with children.

“I will most likely have to see children regularly at my job, so learning how to communicate with them effectively will be important and this course has really helped me learn how to do it,” Newborg said.

Two other older people – Sydney Blom and Hadley Dake – are considering pursuing a career in education and said Rockhill’s class has helped them prepare for such a path.

To match students with other classes in the school, Rockhill asks them what grade level they want to work in and in what content area. Many of his students this semester are helping in elementary classrooms, although one has requested to be in a high school Spanish class.

“Because they are high school students, I tried to find a classroom that has a ninth grade class so that there is an age separation,” Rockhill said.

Grade 2 teacher Jill Meyer has been assisted by Intro to Education students in her classes for the past few years and enjoys the chance to bond with them as they in turn get to know her elementary students. Sophomore Amber Rose – who wants to become an art teacher – worked with Meyer in the second term of this semester.

“They love her because she’s very creative,” said Meyer, explaining how Rose draws a picture for the class each day she visits that goes to a lucky winner who is selected at random.

For Rockhill, one of the most interesting aspects of his students working face-to-face with younger peers is the relationships they form with these students. At the same time, high school students are able to appreciate everything teachers do for their job, which may not be apparent from a student’s perspective.

“Like ‘OK, that’s why they’re doing this and that’s why we organize the way we do it,’ it kind of gives them that a-ha moment,” said Rockhill.

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