mentoring program – Abilities Networks http://abilitiesnetworks.org/ Sat, 16 Apr 2022 23:20:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-4.png mentoring program – Abilities Networks http://abilitiesnetworks.org/ 32 32 TeamMates Mentoring celebrates 30 years https://abilitiesnetworks.org/teammates-mentoring-celebrates-30-years/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 23:15:27 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/teammates-mentoring-celebrates-30-years/ February 23, 2022 5:10 p.m. Courtesy: Teammate Mentoring LINCOLN, Neb. (KLKN) — TeamMates Mentoring, a youth organization founded by Tom and Nancy Osborne, celebrated its 30th anniversary on Wednesday. Teammate Mentoring Program mentor Hannah Miller and 19-year-old UNL sophomore Evelyn Mejia have struck up a lifelong friendship over the past two years amid the pandemic. […]]]>
Courtesy: Teammate Mentoring

LINCOLN, Neb. (KLKN) — TeamMates Mentoring, a youth organization founded by Tom and Nancy Osborne, celebrated its 30th anniversary on Wednesday.

Teammate Mentoring Program mentor Hannah Miller and 19-year-old UNL sophomore Evelyn Mejia have struck up a lifelong friendship over the past two years amid the pandemic.

“Hannah is probably like one of my best friends, definitely one of my best friends goes above and beyond for me every time,” Mejia said.

“Evelyn is my friend forever, she’s the girl that every time I’m in Lincoln, I text her and say hey, you wanna go to Bison Witches, you wanna have coffee,” Miller said.

It all started when Mejia was paired up with Miller in the Teammates program, it was something Mejia was a little skeptical of at first.

“At first I didn’t really want to do it because it seems a bit strange and I was like, I’m just going to have an adult as a friend, but it turned out to be one of the best decisions I’ve ever made. ,” Mejia said.

Tom Osborne and his wife Nancy created the program in 1991.

It all started with 22 football players who agreed to volunteer for an hour once a week at a public school in Lincoln. But 30 years later, they’ve served more than 43,000 young people across Nebraska and several other states.

“The cool thing about Teammates is that we believe every kid deserves a mentor, every kid deserves someone to show up for them once a week and just be there for them,” Miller said.

Teammates need your help with donations and mentors, if you are interested in becoming part of the team, click HERE.

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LaPorte County Commissioners Observe National Mentoring Month | Local News https://abilitiesnetworks.org/laporte-county-commissioners-observe-national-mentoring-month-local-news/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 18:02:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/laporte-county-commissioners-observe-national-mentoring-month-local-news/ LaPorte County Commissioners proclaimed January National Mentoring Month in honor of the campaign’s 20th anniversary. National LaPorte County Mentoring Month provides an opportunity to highlight mentoring programs such as Family Advocates’ CYA program, Slicer Champions School Mentoring Program, Youth Service Bureau’s School Buddies Program, Boys & Girls Club of LaPorte County AWE, MCAS Safe Harbor […]]]>

LaPorte County Commissioners proclaimed January National Mentoring Month in honor of the campaign’s 20th anniversary.

National LaPorte County Mentoring Month provides an opportunity to highlight mentoring programs such as Family Advocates’ CYA program, Slicer Champions School Mentoring Program, Youth Service Bureau’s School Buddies Program, Boys & Girls Club of LaPorte County AWE, MCAS Safe Harbor H40. Mentoring Program and Building Blackhawks Mentoring Program that produces positive benefits and focuses on strategies to develop their capacity to ensure that every youth and child has a mentor.

The proclamation recognizes that mentoring promotes healthy relationships and communication, positive self-esteem, emotional well-being, and growth in young people and their relationships with others.

During the pandemic, mentoring programs have ramped up to fill gaps for young people and families, connecting them to resources and ensuring that mentoring relationships continue virtually to ensure physical distancing does not affect the social link.

Youth who face risk factors but have a mentor are 52% less likely than their peers to skip class and 37% less likely to skip class. Young mentees are 46% less likely than their peers to start using drugs and 27% less likely to start drinking.

The proclamation celebrates National Mentoring Month as a time to celebrate, elevate and encourage mentorship throughout LaPorte County and recruit caring adults to mentor.

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Postoperative anxiety during care transitions reduced with peer mentorship – Consumer Health News https://abilitiesnetworks.org/postoperative-anxiety-during-care-transitions-reduced-with-peer-mentorship-consumer-health-news/ Fri, 28 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/postoperative-anxiety-during-care-transitions-reduced-with-peer-mentorship-consumer-health-news/ FRIDAY, Jan. 28, 2022 (HealthDay News) — Mentoring programs can help improve patients’ transition from hospital to home by reducing their postoperative anxiety following a transplant, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in the Operations management journal. Yeojun Chun of Ohio State University in Columbus and colleagues evaluated a standardized peer-mentoring program where […]]]>

FRIDAY, Jan. 28, 2022 (HealthDay News) — Mentoring programs can help improve patients’ transition from hospital to home by reducing their postoperative anxiety following a transplant, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in the Operations management journal.

Yeojun Chun of Ohio State University in Columbus and colleagues evaluated a standardized peer-mentoring program where former patients mentor current patients for 30 days after discharge. They recruited 80 transplant patients randomly assigned to either mentorship or usual care.

Researchers found that patients in the treatment group experienced a 3.42-point greater decrease in anxiety score over 30 days. Unexpectedly, patients in the treatment group had a 12.6 times higher risk of readmission during the first 30 days. Investigators suggested that this finding was due to patients reporting complications earlier and being treated sooner.

“Patients and ex-patients can and should be co-creators of value in the care transition process,” a co-author said in a statement. “These are vital resources for care management, especially because nurses, doctors and social workers are already overworked. Hospitals can benefit from a structured approach to matching patients with a mentor to help them get through the first months of post-surgical anxiety.”

Abstract/Full text (subscription or payment may be required)

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The Frisco ISD Mentorship Program provides academic and emotional support https://abilitiesnetworks.org/the-frisco-isd-mentorship-program-provides-academic-and-emotional-support/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 20:02:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/the-frisco-isd-mentorship-program-provides-academic-and-emotional-support/ Frisco ISD Achieve mentors meet with their mentees at least once a week. (Courtesy of Frisco ISD) When the COVID-19 pandemic struck, staff saw the need for a formal, district-wide mentoring program, said Randall Ford, student mentoring coordinator for Frisco ISD. In response, the district launched FISD Achieve Mentoring, or FAM, in the fall semester […]]]>

Frisco ISD Achieve mentors meet with their mentees at least once a week. (Courtesy of Frisco ISD)

When the COVID-19 pandemic struck, staff saw the need for a formal, district-wide mentoring program, said Randall Ford, student mentoring coordinator for Frisco ISD. In response, the district launched FISD Achieve Mentoring, or FAM, in the fall semester of 2021.

Prior to the program, there were several campuses that had individuals or organizations volunteering to mentor students. Part of the purpose of creating FAM was to make sure each mentor had the same training and guidelines to follow, Ford said.

The program is in the early stages of recruiting volunteers to match with students of all ages. As of mid-December, there were about 35 mentors, most of them volunteers before FAM, Ford said.

He added that his goal is to have mentors in each school.

“We are looking for people who are just willing to give of their heart and time and to embark on a journey of at least a year,” said Ford.

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After applicants pass a background check, they attend a 40-minute Ford-led training. The session covers topics such as dos and don’ts and how to report emergencies. Ford is also running a business that demonstrates the importance of attention to detail. He pairs mentors together and has them observe their partners for about 15 seconds. Then they sit back to back and each person changes something in their appearance, such as taking off a watch or undoing a shoe. Then the pair face each other again and try to identify what has changed.

“The main thing is to share with them how important it is to be present during this short 30-minute period and to be aware and to recognize the things that they can see,” said Ford. “If you want to build trust and relationship, then you recognize these things.”

Mentors have a minimum time commitment of one 30 minute session with their mentee each week. Some mentors meet more frequently and some volunteers have two mentees.

During the application process, volunteers have the option of selecting the area in which they wish to focus: academic or whole child. College mentors provide academic and / or career advice. Whole Child Mentors provide social and emotional support in addition to academic support.

“Sometimes whenever people think of mentoring, if it’s not academic, they automatically think a student has a problem and needs to fill the role of a counselor or social worker,” Ford said. “We want to make sure we encourage them, it’s not their role to mentor. Anyone can be a mentor. … We just encourage them to be genuine.

Ford added that the district is accepting mentors from outside of Frisco. Anyone who works in or near the community is welcome to apply.

Richardson resident Wendy Scott had her first session with a ninth grade student at Emerson High School in early December. She said the meeting went well and laid the groundwork for future topics to discuss with her mentee.

“I didn’t have this program in high school, and it’s amazing that there is a program like this because sometimes you might want to talk to a third party,” Scott said. “It’s very positive, that’s for sure.

More information, including how to register for upcoming mentoring trainings, is available at www.friscoisd.org/departments/guidance-and-counseling/achieve-mentoring-program.

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Grand Area Mentoring Awarded Seed Grant to Moonflower Seeds | Go out and go https://abilitiesnetworks.org/grand-area-mentoring-awarded-seed-grant-to-moonflower-seeds-go-out-and-go/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 00:34:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/grand-area-mentoring-awarded-seed-grant-to-moonflower-seeds-go-out-and-go/ [ad_1] Some of the most powerful bonding experiences that Daniel McNeil, Grand Area Mentoring Program Director, has had with his childhood mentors have been over meals. There is something about eating together that brings people together, he says. When McNeil applied for the Seeds to Start grant through the Moonflower Community Co-op, on behalf of […]]]>


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Some of the most powerful bonding experiences that Daniel McNeil, Grand Area Mentoring Program Director, has had with his childhood mentors have been over meals. There is something about eating together that brings people together, he says.

When McNeil applied for the Seeds to Start grant through the Moonflower Community Co-op, on behalf of Grand Area Mentoring, he had these moments in mind: His proposed use of the grant money would be to provide mentors and mentees. vouchers for Moonflower, so the pairs could learn, buy and enjoy snacks together.

Grand Area Mentoring received the grant in December. The mentoring program began in 2005, pairing adult volunteers with children seeking guidance. Mentors and mentees meet for one hour a week and form friendships. 22 currently paired mentors / mentees will benefit from the Moonflower grant, McNeil said.

“I think it will give [mentees] a new opportunity to shop in a place where they might never have been before, ”said McNeil. “They are going to experience something new, their horizons are going to broaden and they are going to have a bonding experience with their mentors.”

When the program started it was based in the Grand County School District – mentors met their mentees there. But a few years ago, McNeil developed a new program: Once mentees have formed a friendship with their mentor and reached middle school, they can meet their mentors outside of school.

The purpose of the Moonflower Seeds to Start grant is to provide financial assistance to any local nonprofit or individual who will “cultivate holistic community well-being,” which can be interpreted in a variety of ways, said Maggie Keating, coordinator of Marketing and Outreach at Moonflower. .

“The mentor and mentees can use the grant as an experience to learn about so many different things in the co-op,” she said. “From local food and local farms to the environmental impact of our globalized food system, and why we try to focus so much on sourcing our food locally and fairly and sustainably. “

She and three other co-op employees were part of the grants committee this year and ultimately chose Grand Area Mentoring because they were inspired by the idea that the grant could be used to directly educate community members who don’t. might not have this opportunity otherwise.

Grand Area Mentoring is always looking to increase its number of adult mentors, McNeil said. Currently, the program has over 20 children on the waiting list. In 2020, the program had to take a hiatus due to complications with the COVID-19 pandemic. But towards the end of last year, the program started to grow slowly again: a new cohort of mentors started in September, and another cohort will start at the end of January 2022.

Adult volunteers go through a major screening and training process before they are matched, and it works: The national average for the mentor-mentee program relationships is around six months, McNeil said, but the Grand Area mentors Mentoring typically work with their mentees for at least three months. year.

“Many mentors find this volunteer opportunity extremely rewarding,” said McNeil. “There is a real need for more mentors. We would like to match some of these kids eager to have a mentor and eager to be guided with the kind and responsible adults we know in Moab.

Mentees run from Grades 1 to 12, with most new matches being done at the elementary school level – the perfect time for a child to enter the program is between Grades 2 and 5, said McNeil.

Any adult interested in volunteering can upload an application on the Grand Area Mentoring website (www.grandmentoring.org). The next mentor orientation will take place on Thursday, January 27.

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Judges Napa, Sonoma and Marin from among those selected for the mentorship panel https://abilitiesnetworks.org/judges-napa-sonoma-and-marin-from-among-those-selected-for-the-mentorship-panel/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 19:37:36 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/judges-napa-sonoma-and-marin-from-among-those-selected-for-the-mentorship-panel/ [ad_1] A California judicial mentoring program currently consists of judges from three North Bay counties as well as a judge from Solano County. Napa County Superior Court Judge Monique Langhorne, Sonoma County Judge Chris Honigsberg and Marin County Judge Andrew Sweet will be part of a North Bay task force for the Justice Mentorship Program. […]]]>


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A California judicial mentoring program currently consists of judges from three North Bay counties as well as a judge from Solano County.

Napa County Superior Court Judge Monique Langhorne, Sonoma County Judge Chris Honigsberg and Marin County Judge Andrew Sweet will be part of a North Bay task force for the Justice Mentorship Program. State. Solano County Judge Christine Carringe will also be in the group, the group said Thursday.

The North Bay Project is a partnership with Gov. Gavin Newsom’s office, which in July launched the Judicial Mentorship Program – which includes sections for appellate and trial courts – to help create a more inclusive justice system.

“The remarkable diversity of our state is a point of pride and strength that I am committed to advancing at all levels of state government,” Newsom said in the statement. “This mentorship program supports our efforts to identify the best and brightest judicial candidates from across the state, contributing to a stronger, more inclusive bench to better serve all Californians.”

Judges serving in the North Bay Regional Collaboration will communicate with all sectors of the legal community, including bar associations, nonprofit legal organizations, local firms and independent practitioners, to support lawyers considering legal action. sit in local courts of first instance. The program will strive to identify and provide forensic mentors to these attorneys, and provide information on the judicial appointment process, answer questions about the nomination and verification, and make recommendations to improve suitability for the legal profession. nomination.

“The process of applying, reviewing and ultimately selecting a judge can be cumbersome and intimidating,” Langhorne said in the statement. “Our goal is to help qualified individuals interested in assuming the seat of the Headquarters Officer, both as a support resource and as a mentor, as they navigate the judicial nomination process. In doing so, we will work collaboratively to encourage a diverse group of applicants to pursue public service through the state justice system. “

A native of Vallejo, Langhorne served Napa County in Child Support Services and the District Attorney’s Office before becoming County Court Commissioner in 2006, overseeing matters such as restraining orders, custody of children, misdemeanor indictments, drug court and traffic violations. She was appointed to the Napa County bench in 2018 by the government of the day. Jerry Brown and was elected to a full four-year term as a judge in March 2020.

Honigsberg was appointed in February 2018, filling a vacancy created by the retirement of Judge Elliot Daum. He previously served as the Assistant District Attorney in Sonoma County.

The 38-year-old when he was selected for the bench, Petaluma’s Honigsberg was the youngest person in recent history to join the 20-member bench.

Sweet was appointed a judge in 2009. He received his bachelor’s degree from the University of California, Berkeley and his law degree from the University of San Francisco School of Law.

The Democratic Press contributed to this report.

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Five years of mentoring support https://abilitiesnetworks.org/five-years-of-mentoring-support/ Thu, 16 Dec 2021 05:40:54 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/five-years-of-mentoring-support/ [ad_1] Intandem supports young people on probation We all need consistent relationships and trust. For young people who have caregiving experience, these relationships can sometimes be lacking. The long-term presence of a trusted and supportive adult can make all the difference in the trajectory of their life. We are celebrating five years of Intandem, Scotland’s […]]]>

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Intandem supports young people on probation

We all need consistent relationships and trust. For young people who have caregiving experience, these relationships can sometimes be lacking. The long-term presence of a trusted and supportive adult can make all the difference in the trajectory of their life.

We are celebrating five years of Intandem, Scotland’s national mentoring program. Funded by the Scottish Government and implemented by Inspiring Scotland, the program connects young people and volunteer mentors to build meaningful, supportive and lasting relationships.

Since 2016, Intandem has been supporting young people kept at home on probation (CSO). While being in care is often linked to social disadvantage, children and young people in home care have the lowest scores of all young people in Scotland, through no fault of their own. intandem helps these young people develop positive relationships with a trusted adult role model. Weekly mentoring provides a space for these relationships to flourish.

Intandem is a community mentoring program, with meetings taking place outside of the school environment. Over the past five years, Intandem has trained 733 volunteers and coordinated 450 games. With over 3,500 children and young people in Scotland currently living at home as part of a CSO, it is essential that we continue to invest in them with mentoring support, so that these children do not fall through the cracks. net.

We know that work in tandem. The average match lasts 17 months, providing the youngsters with long-term stability and support. Youth mentees consistently report a range of positive results, including improved self-esteem (62%), increased community engagement (64%), and better friendships (64%). With Covid-19 causing increased feelings of anxiety and isolation, it’s more crucial than ever that all young people have the opportunity to form meaningful relationships.

With Intandem, Inspiring Scotland is committed to helping Scotland #Keep the promise, a commitment to incorporating the voices of young people with experience in care when making decisions about the Scottish care system. As part of this commitment, intandem is organizing a Youth Forum, where young people with experience in care can express themselves on the problems closest to them. The intandem staff are also currently working with an experienced caregiver, to help shape the intandem work as we look to the future.

intandem is made possible by the commitment of its funder, the Scottish Government. It also depends on the dedication of volunteers and the commitment of the program’s 12 charitable partners, who work tirelessly to coordinate matches across Scotland. These charities are committed to matching more young people with mentors, to ensure that every young person has the opportunity to thrive.

Intandem has a bold and ambitious vision – that the children, youth and families of Scotland can stay together to build and maintain positive and loving relationships. intandem is currently established in 19 local communities and aims to develop even further.

As we continue to grow, Intandem can help Scotland #KeepThePromise to all experienced infants, children, adolescents, adults and their families – may every child grow up loved, safe and respected, able to reach their full potential.

Julia Abel is Head of Development and Partnerships at Inspiring Scotland


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Valley News – Claremont man known for supervising children accused of child pornography https://abilitiesnetworks.org/valley-news-claremont-man-known-for-supervising-children-accused-of-child-pornography/ Mon, 13 Dec 2021 02:18:07 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/valley-news-claremont-man-known-for-supervising-children-accused-of-child-pornography/ [ad_1] Valley Correspondent Posted: 12/12/2021 21:16:10 PM Modified: 12/12/2021 21:15:34 PM BURLINGTON – A 34-year-old man from Claremont known for his efforts to mentor children in the Twin States has been arrested for a felony of producing child pornography, aka child pornography, in Windsor County, Vermont federal officials say . Wayne Miller, formerly of Hartland, […]]]>


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Valley Correspondent

Posted: 12/12/2021 21:16:10 PM

Modified: 12/12/2021 21:15:34 PM

BURLINGTON – A 34-year-old man from Claremont known for his efforts to mentor children in the Twin States has been arrested for a felony of producing child pornography, aka child pornography, in Windsor County, Vermont federal officials say .

Wayne Miller, formerly of Hartland, appeared briefly in Burlington U.S. District Court via video from the Southern State Correctional Facility in Springfield, Vermont on Friday afternoon. He was taken into custody without bail.

A prosecutor wrote in court documents that “the criminal complaint establishes instances where Miller sexually assaulted a toddler he knew, and he videotaped the abuse.”

If convicted of the charge, Miller faces a mandatory minimum of 15 years in prison.

Miller “is the founder and director of Living Proof Mentoring, a program that connects black mentors for black youth in Vermont,” according to a 2020 post on Mentor Vermont social media.

The Vermont Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force found at least three photographs in an email account on Miller’s cell phone, depicting sexual abuse involving a young child and a man’s lower body, according to a court affidavit .

Miller told investigators he was the man in the photographs, wrote Special Agent Scott Labor of Homeland Security Investigations.

The charges date back to June 2020, when Miller lived at 87 Depot Road in Hartland; He moved from Windsor County ahead of a planned raid on his home this month, records show.

Law enforcement finally raided his apartment at 132 Chestnut St. in Claremont on Wednesday.

During the raid, Miller told investigators they would find child sexual abuse material in his email account on his cell phone, court records show.

Vermont law enforcement is renaming child pornography as “child sexual abuse material” and referring to it by the initials – CSAM.

During the hearing, Assistant U.S. Attorney Barbara Masterson requested that Miller be detained on the grounds that he posed both a significant danger to the community and a serious risk of absconding.

“He has an obvious sexual interest in children, and he acted accordingly,” Masterson wrote in his request for detention.

She said there were also concerns for Miller’s “precarious mental health.” Miller “recently checked in to the hospital due to his depression and suicidal thoughts.” He was released from the hospital on Wednesday and was housed that evening at Springfield Jail.

His initial court appearance “had to be delayed because he was under suicide watch at the facility. The government is gravely concerned that Miller will self-harm if he is released, ”Masterson wrote.

Trial judge Kevin Doyle approved the detention, also citing the weight of evidence and Miller’s criminal history, the records show. Doyle has set a probable cause hearing for December 22.

The investigation began when Google sent a cyber tip to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in November 2020 after discovering that a user had attempted to email the material to another account. NCMEC forwarded the e-advice to Vermont Internet Task Force Commander Matt Raymond.

The Vermont task force has obtained search warrants for the two Google accounts involved in the transfer attempt. Through this work, investigators uncovered additional footage, some of which appeared to have been produced by Miller, and learned that the accused likely controlled both accounts, court records show.

Mike Donoghue can be contacted at vermontnewsfirst@gmail.com.

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Mentorship program for children in Florida detention centers, including Jacksonville https://abilitiesnetworks.org/mentorship-program-for-children-in-florida-detention-centers-including-jacksonville/ Thu, 09 Dec 2021 16:49:37 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/mentorship-program-for-children-in-florida-detention-centers-including-jacksonville/ [ad_1] JACKSONVILLE, Florida – A twist on traditional mentoring: A mentoring program seeks help in reaching children in detention centers. The individual program is called the VERB Kind. It is a mentoring program serving eight counties in the Sunshine State, including Duval. “We’re now in eight counties, across the state of Florida, eight. We have […]]]>


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JACKSONVILLE, Florida – A twist on traditional mentoring: A mentoring program seeks help in reaching children in detention centers.

The individual program is called the VERB Kind.

It is a mentoring program serving eight counties in the Sunshine State, including Duval.

“We’re now in eight counties, across the state of Florida, eight. We have a few left. But our latest is Brevard and Marion County, Ocala and Cocoa Beach. So we’re in Tampa, Jacksonville, we’re in Orlando, Fort Lauderdale, Miami. So all over the state of Florida we are so thankful, ”said Haley Hunt, Founder of VERB Kind.

The more than 80 volunteers have helped impact more than 3,000 incarcerated children through a variety of activities.

The founder says everyone deserves the grace no matter what their life may be like.

“We hang out with kids in jail,” Hunt said.

Hunt’s mission is to make an impact on incarcerated youth across Florida through a unique mentorship program.

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“VERB stands for Victory Everyday Restoring Belief. We get the victory. We win every day by restoring faith, not only in these children, but in humanity, ”said Hunt.

Hunt explained what makes this type of mentoring different from other programs.

“We are there for them. Many of these children have never felt the love of a father or a mother before. They never played Uno. They never had a pizza party. As if many of these children come from nothing. And to feel the forgiveness, to feel the redemption, just having someone listen to them is so powerful, ”Hunt said.

Every Monday, a group of volunteers go to detention centers and spend time with the children serving sentences.

Whether it’s playing Uno, presenting guest speakers, barbecues, or writing songs, the time these volunteers spend creates new realities for children who otherwise might not believe in Second Chances.

“The VERB Kind sees these kids, and we see doctors, we see lawyers, we see artists and athletes, we see long-lost engineers and barbers – you know, kids with a passion for something. “said Hunt.

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Hunt says every kid behind bars deserves a mentorship, no matter what they look like.

“The question is, why would you want to celebrate or reward children who are in prison? Do you know why you would do that? But I love to challenge everyone we all deserve jail. As if we all deserved some sort of punishment that we were kind enough not to receive. We haven’t treated people the right way or anything, ”Hunt said.

To continue its mission of supporting the greatest number of young people incarcerated across the state, VERB Kind is looking for more volunteers and organizations to team up with, particularly in River City.

It will be relaunched in January. You can find more information on how to get involved here: https://www.theverbkind.com/ or on Instagram @cometojailwithme.

Copyright 2021 by WJXT News4Jax – All rights reserved.


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Our Take: Mentoring is another victim of COVID-19 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/our-take-mentoring-is-another-victim-of-covid-19/ Tue, 07 Dec 2021 15:00:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/our-take-mentoring-is-another-victim-of-covid-19/ [ad_1] Children have been isolated, out of school and disengaged, their social skills suffer, and their growth and development have been stunted. At the same time, due to COVID-19, the nonprofit has not been able to stand in front of people to recruit them as adult mentors as it has in the past and like […]]]>


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Children have been isolated, out of school and disengaged, their social skills suffer, and their growth and development have been stunted.

At the same time, due to COVID-19, the nonprofit has not been able to stand in front of people to recruit them as adult mentors as it has in the past and like itself. needs it to maintain its unique purpose. -a connection that feels good and creates positive results in Duluth and Superior.

The results: Only 95 youth from Twin Ports are currently matched with adult mentors – and another 122 are on a waiting list that can last two years or more. Many children are not prepared to wait that long, and this may further exacerbate the development of their social skills and other necessary tools as they become adults.

“We know that when young people have a mentor, it builds their resilience and reduces isolation. It reduces anxiety and depression. This increases their ties to the community. It involves them in their communities and more likely leads them to leadership positions, ”said Beth Burt, executive director of Mentor North, in an exclusive interview last week with members of the News Tribune editorial board. “We all have these big impacts from an individual relationship.

“And so, right now, everyone is thinking, ‘What can we do for our young people? I would say one of the answers is to become a mentor.

Mentor North plans to intensify its recruiting in the coming new year, to resume recruiting volunteer and qualified adults as before. Its goal is for 75 new mentors to successfully complete the selection process, including a thorough background check and training. The goal is ambitious. In a typical year, that is, one year before COVID-19, Mentor North recruited 40 to 50 new adult volunteer mentors.

“Our goal is to reduce that waiting list,” said Burt. “These are all kinds of children, all kinds of young people. It really is any youngster who might need more adult support in their life, for whatever reason.

Don’t worry, interested adults. You will be matched with a child who shares at least some of your interests; the selection process ensures this. The minimum time commitment is four hours per month very doable, although eight to 12 hours is often more typical. And it won’t drain your bank account. Mentor North has partnered with local businesses and attractions to provide one-time purchase offers and free or discounted tickets to ski, see a theater performance, and more.

“In fact, we’re finding that it’s the simple things mentors do that mentees enjoy the most,” Burt said. “They do things like invite them over and cook a meal together. They are going to play basketball together. They will meet at the library together. They do arts and crafts together.

Doing such things makes a huge difference. MENTOR National determined in 2020 that at-risk youth matched with mentors were 55% more likely to go to college, 78% more likely to volunteer regularly, and 130% more likely to be in leadership roles.

“The purpose of a mentor is just to be there for that kid and to spend some time alone helping them develop their interests, their identity,” said Burt. “There is a lot of fun to do, fun things people do with their mentees. We don’t expect anyone to solve the world’s problems here, just to be there for a child who needs him.

Mentor North began as a YMCA program in the 1940s. The association formed in 2019 when the future of the interesting program seemed to be in doubt. It’s the only one-on-one mentoring program in Twin Ports right now, according to Burt.

Mentor North is far from the only one in need of volunteers, donations or other public support. As with so many other nonprofits and programs in Duluth and across the country whose mission is to improve lives or provide services, the pandemic has been absolutely devastating. To find where you, your time, or your money could do good, head to Volunteermatch.org or search for other resources online to find opportunities.

To help Mentor North specifically or to learn more, visit mentornorth.org. Call the association at 218-722-3600 or send an email to info@mentornorth.org.

Your help is needed more than ever, especially as we are getting back to normal after the pandemic. Or try.

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