mental health – Abilities Networks http://abilitiesnetworks.org/ Sat, 16 Apr 2022 23:23:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-4.png mental health – Abilities Networks http://abilitiesnetworks.org/ 32 32 Teachers ‘straining under pressure’ from student mental health crisis | Education https://abilitiesnetworks.org/teachers-straining-under-pressure-from-student-mental-health-crisis-education/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/teachers-straining-under-pressure-from-student-mental-health-crisis-education/ Schools and teachers are ‘straining under pressure’ to support the growing number of school children developing mental health problems such as anxiety and depression, experts say. Despite being the people students turn to most often when in distress, teachers are hampered in their desire to help by the profession’s widespread lack of training in dealing […]]]>

Schools and teachers are ‘straining under pressure’ to support the growing number of school children developing mental health problems such as anxiety and depression, experts say.

Despite being the people students turn to most often when in distress, teachers are hampered in their desire to help by the profession’s widespread lack of training in dealing with mental health issues. .

The huge barriers many families in England face in getting help for their son or daughter from NHS Child and Young People‘s Mental Health Services (CAMHS) is putting pressure on schools, say a group of education and health experts writing in the journal of the Royal Society of Medicine.

“The growing health needs of children are currently not being met by the health sector. Schools and teachers provide vital support, but they cave under the pressure of the demands placed on them,” they say.

“The mental health of children and young people in England, and the services designed to support them, are in a dire state,” they add. While rates of mental illness among under-18s have halved in the past three years, “supply is nowhere near enough to meet need”.

Only one in four of the 500,000 children and young people referred to CAMHS each year receive help as services are stretched, and many are denied care because they are not deemed sick enough.

The authors include Chloe Lowry from the UCL Institute of Education in London, Lisa-Maria Müller and Alison Peacock from the Chartered College of Teaching and Anant Jani from the Institute of Global Health at the University of Heidelberg in Germany. Schools should receive NHS funding to help them train teachers to meet growing needs, they argue.

Teachers’ in-depth knowledge and regular interaction with their students means that they are “not only the first port of call when things go wrong, but for many the only port of call”. Surveys show that children and young people turn to them for help more often than to their own families. Teachers are considered, alongside GPs and social workers, as part of the first level of support from CAMHS.

“It is therefore both astonishing and alarming that teachers in England are not adequately trained for these roles,” the authors write. Only one teacher per school in England receives mental health awareness training.

Despite being Level 1 CAMHS professionals, only 40% of teachers feel equipped to teach children in their class with mental health needs and only 32% knew which organizations outside the school could help students , according to a government report in 2016.

“While schools and colleges are doing all they can for students, the fact remains that the lack of support and provision of mental health services for children and young people has been a persistent problem for the past many years,” said Dr. Mary Bousted, Joint Chief Executive Officer. secretary of the NEU, the main teachers’ union. Covid made the situation worse, she added.

“Workload, lack of external support, insufficient staff to work on pastoral issues and training are all huge barriers to students getting the support they need and should expect. .”

Consultant clinical psychologist Dr Nihara Krause said teachers need to have specialist mental health services they can refer students to as students present with increasingly complex problems.

“Schools should provide basic mental health training to all staff, have specialist trained teachers, have support for staff to share challenges they may face in their students and themselves, [and] have clear school policies and procedures on dealing with students with different mental health issues,” Krause added.

A government spokesperson said: ‘We are supporting teachers to help children and young people recover from the emotional impact of the pandemic, including providing training for key mental health officers in every school and college public by 2025.

“To support pupils with more complex needs, we have also invested an additional £79 million to expand children’s mental health services and accelerate the deployment of mental health support teams, which will enable almost three million children in England have access to health experts at school or college. by April 2024.”

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Mercer alum helps others with holistic coaching https://abilitiesnetworks.org/mercer-alum-helps-others-with-holistic-coaching/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/mercer-alum-helps-others-with-holistic-coaching/ Former Mercer student Meghan Dorman has turned her interest in how the body works into a career by helping others discover how to take full control of how they feel. Dorman is a certified functional nutrition therapy practitioner, fitness trainer, blogger, speaker, and entrepreneur. She started studying at Mercer in 1999 as a pre-medical major, […]]]>

Former Mercer student Meghan Dorman has turned her interest in how the body works into a career by helping others discover how to take full control of how they feel. Dorman is a certified functional nutrition therapy practitioner, fitness trainer, blogger, speaker, and entrepreneur.

She started studying at Mercer in 1999 as a pre-medical major, but after struggling with chemistry, she realized she needed to steer her studies in a different direction. She moved on to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, graduating in 2003 with degrees in communications and Spanish. At Mercer, she learned collaborative skills, learned the value and power of language, and practiced using those skills to help and empower others, she said.

After interning with a local news channel in St. Petersburg, Florida, Dorman took a job at a small public relations firm and found she really enjoyed that kind of work. She then worked for Tech Data Corporation in Clearwater, Florida, first as a writer in the corporate communications department, then as a business development manager for Cisco Systems.

During this time, Dorman was also pursuing his passions for health and fitness and his interest in entrepreneurship. She earned a CrossFit, CrossFit Kids, and Prenatal Coach certification and started the first CrossFit Kids branch on the West Coast of Florida.

Wanting to leave the corporate world behind, she quit Tech Data in 2011 when her first child turned one. She continued to teach exercise classes and began leading quarterly nutrition challenges, which she found she enjoyed even more than the fitness work.

“It’s really cool to teach someone that their body is more capable than they think,” said Dorman, who now has two children with husband Eric. “I loved that part of fitness, coaching and training, but nutrition is where people’s lives change.”

Dorman enrolled in a holistic nutrition program and graduated in 2016 as a Certified Practitioner in Functional Nutrition Therapy. She started doing holistic wellness coaching with individual clients, while continuing to coach adult CrossFit classes, and has seen her business grow and evolve since then.

Meghan and Eric Dorman with their children.

“People come to me for a myriad of reasons,” Dorman said. “Most of them want to lose weight, but usually there is something else going on. I like working alongside their medical practitioners to support them from within.

As a wellness coach, she serves as a “supportive guide” as she educates clients on how their bodies work and how food works, she said. She works with them to create new habits and strategies that can change the way they feel and live.

Dorman and her younger sister, Haley, who is a licensed mental health therapist, found that their two areas of expertise often went hand in hand when working with clients. They hosted a weekly podcast titled “Nourish Joy” in 2019, and now they’re set to launch a joint venture this year. In addition to their own private practices, they will co-run a business focused on treating the body holistically. They hope to offer large-scale events, digital courses and e-books that will help people reconnect with their own bodies and learn to reintegrate this autonomy into their daily lives.

“What I love about my job is getting people to come back into themselves, go home, and fully inhabit their bodies,” Dorman said. “There is an awakening that comes when you realize you have full control of how you feel. You have all of this within you. My favorite part of the job is showing people it’s true and how to access it themselves.

Meghan Dorman, right, and her sister, Haley.

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Investments in OR training could boost workforce / Public News Service https://abilitiesnetworks.org/investments-in-or-training-could-boost-workforce-public-news-service/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 03:03:11 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/investments-in-or-training-could-boost-workforce-public-news-service/ In an effort to boost workers in critical industries, Oregon lawmakers are considering a major investment in education and workforce development. Proposed by Governor Kate Brown, the $200 million Future Ready Bill is a set of proposals aimed at reducing barriers to jobs in construction, healthcare, manufacturing and technology. One of the proposals is $17 […]]]>

In an effort to boost workers in critical industries, Oregon lawmakers are considering a major investment in education and workforce development.

Proposed by Governor Kate Brown, the $200 million Future Ready Bill is a set of proposals aimed at reducing barriers to jobs in construction, healthcare, manufacturing and technology.

One of the proposals is $17 million for career path programs that put in place short-term ways to earn credentials, with the help of program navigators.

Mark Mitsui, president of Portland Community College, said the certificates are stackable, so people can graduate, get a job, and then come back to school whenever they want without starting over.

“And that creates this kind of virtuous cycle of upward mobility,” Mitsui explained. “This is really what our state workers need to access gainful employment through education and training.”

The bill aims to increase access for priority populations, including people of color, tribals, veterans and residents of rural communities. The measure enjoys the support of professional organisations. Groups such as the Associated Oregon Loggers say the measure has potential but would like their industry included.

The bill also includes workforce readiness grants to remove barriers to education and training, such as the cost of child care and housing.

Patsy Richards, director of Long-Term CareWorks for the RISE partnership, which provides training and benefits and is linked to unions such as Service Employees International Union Local 503, said another important provision would ensure that prior training of people aren’t erased, noting that people come to Oregon with experience.

“But they don’t get credit for prior learning,” observed Richards. “And so we put them through all these courses and go through all these hoops where we should have a mechanism to assess and give them credit for their prior learning, so they can move up and get into our workforce faster. “

The bill includes $10 million for prior learning credit.

Mitsui added that a colleague once told him that talent is universal, but opportunities are not.

“Future Ready Oregon, or Senate Bill 1545, aims to make opportunity as universal as the talent around us by reimagining the workforce system and creating more equitable opportunities through education and training for the new work landscape,” concluded Mitsui.

Support for this report was provided by Lumina Foundation.

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FSU graduate focuses on mentorship and passion for art https://abilitiesnetworks.org/fsu-graduate-focuses-on-mentorship-and-passion-for-art/ Tue, 22 Feb 2022 11:07:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/fsu-graduate-focuses-on-mentorship-and-passion-for-art/ A Fayetteville State University graduate has gone from years in the foster care system to caring for other children in the same group home that housed him. Prince Pickney said he was 14 when he was sent to Falcon Children’s Home after being abused by a parent with drug addiction and mental health issues. “There’s […]]]>

A Fayetteville State University graduate has gone from years in the foster care system to caring for other children in the same group home that housed him.

Prince Pickney said he was 14 when he was sent to Falcon Children’s Home after being abused by a parent with drug addiction and mental health issues.

“There’s been child abuse. Not all the time, but when you’re bipolar and you’re mixing drugs, those kinds of things are going to happen,” he said.

The Falcon Children’s Home offers transitional living for older teens and family services for foster care and adoption.

Pickney, now 28, said he lived there until he was 20. When he graduated from FSU in 2018, he returned to the children’s home to become a mentor for children in the same situation he once was.

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For Concord-area youth, mentoring can create lifelong connections https://abilitiesnetworks.org/for-concord-area-youth-mentoring-can-create-lifelong-connections/ Sat, 12 Feb 2022 23:36:52 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/for-concord-area-youth-mentoring-can-create-lifelong-connections/ The first time Michael Franklin met Andy Julian, he was a little worried. At 13, Franklin was wary of new people and didn’t know what to expect from the mentorship program he joined at his grandmother’s suggestion. Nor had he realized that Julian, a veterinarian, had nine dogs, four cats, six horses, goats, llamas, alpacas […]]]>

The first time Michael Franklin met Andy Julian, he was a little worried.

At 13, Franklin was wary of new people and didn’t know what to expect from the mentorship program he joined at his grandmother’s suggestion. Nor had he realized that Julian, a veterinarian, had nine dogs, four cats, six horses, goats, llamas, alpacas and sheep in his Canterbury home.

“I was like, ‘That’s a lot of animals,'” Franklin recalled with a laugh. “I was a bit nervous, especially with all the dogs barking. But I’m a really good dog person.

Julian and Franklin were paired as a mentor and mentee five years ago through the Friends Youth Mentorship Program, which matches Merrimack County children ages 6 to 17 with a mentor who can serve positive role model and advocate.

On a recent Thursday, Franklin, who is now 17 and a senior at Merrimack Valley High School, and Julian, who is 61, sat in a sunny corner of a McDonald’s on Fisherville Road in Penacook – the same spot where they met on their first day of mentoring. Julian, who was a first-time mentor when he was paired with Franklin, says he joined the program because he wanted to make a difference and offer a young person advice he didn’t have. maybe not at home. Franklin, who lives with his grandmother, said he joined the program because he didn’t have a father figure in his life.

“I wasn’t in the best place, but I didn’t want to tell anyone that I didn’t know everything, about how I felt and about my life,” Franklin said. “When I finally had a connection, he helped me.”

Over the past five years, Julian and Franklin have hiked, played disc golf and drank countless cups of coffee. Julian taught Franklin how to drive a car – including a manual transmission – and helped him get the practice hours he needed for his license. They did house repair projects, working on small houses to renovate. Franklin even completed his senior project observing at Pembroke Veterinary Hospital, Julian’s veterinary practice, where he observed animal exams, surgeries, and euthanasia.

Now Franklin says he considers Julian his father, and Julian – who has two daughters – refers to Franklin as the son he never had.

“Whenever I meet someone for the first time, I always hesitate about them, like I can’t trust them. But I slowly started to trust them and open up to them” Franklin said, “It’s pretty cool that I was his first mentee and he was my first mentor. It means a lot. It certainly wasn’t a mistake to match us.”

The need for mentors is high in the Concord area as the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted recruitment numbers and the organization’s outreach capabilities. Lily Wellington, director of volunteer programs at the Friends Program, says they currently have a waiting list of 80 children looking for mentors.

The program was originally established in 1975 as “junior-senior friends”, to provide role models for young people involved in the juvenile justice system or on the cusp of it. Today, the program has an average of 100 active mentor pairs per year. Many of the children involved are from new American families.

“Some 30 years later, we are now operating with the same theory, which is that if you provide a positive and caring role model invested in the development of an at-risk youth, you can make a big difference to those outcomes,” Wellington said. .

All mentors go through a selection process that includes an application, interview, home visit, background check and driving check, are matched with a child based on common interests or skills, and are asked to spend about one to three hours a week with their mentee.

Julian says one thing he’s learned is that he can be a mentor just by being himself, without having to do anything “spectacular”.

“Pick up the phone and call them. You don’t have to embark on a grand adventure,” Julian said. “Sometimes I pick him up, we have coffee and that’s about it, or walk the dogs or something.”

Franklin plans to graduate from high school, after which he hopes to study criminal justice at NHTI and Franklin Pierce University. He has big dreams of becoming a police officer who values ​​diversity, has the skills to defuse mental health crisis situations, and is not afraid to risk his life to help people in times of need.

“What motivates me is just knowing that I can make an impact,” Franklin said. “Even though I’m just one person, I can just spread positivity to everyone and they spread it and say, ‘This officer is a good officer. ”

The Friends program only requires a one-year committee from its participants, but many choose to go beyond that. Julian and Franklin both agree that they will have a lifelong friendship. They are already discussing plans to renovate more old houses in the future.

“It’s not like, ‘Oh, the program is over, see you later,'” Julian said. “He’s my son now, so I’ll be there for him forever.”

Those interested in signing up to become mentors can learn more at www.friendsprogram.org.

]]> Indiana Police Department addresses use-of-force training after de-escalation law passes https://abilitiesnetworks.org/indiana-police-department-addresses-use-of-force-training-after-de-escalation-law-passes/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 04:45:47 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/indiana-police-department-addresses-use-of-force-training-after-de-escalation-law-passes/ INDIANA – Over the past two years, several Indiana law enforcement agencies have changed their use of force policies. In light of a Purdue University police investigation into a recent arrest, we take a look at a new state law that addresses the use of force. In July, a new state law went into effect […]]]>

INDIANA – Over the past two years, several Indiana law enforcement agencies have changed their use of force policies.

In light of a Purdue University police investigation into a recent arrest, we take a look at a new state law that addresses the use of force.

In July, a new state law went into effect that requires law enforcement officers to undergo de-escalation training,

“It was really important,” said Marion County Sheriff’s Office Captain David Roberts.

MORE | Purdue University police officer on leave amid investigation into filmed arrest

House Bill 1006 was introduced following the death of George Floyd, which sparked protests across the country demanding police reform and a choking ban.

Indiana’s new law also defines strangulation and classifies it as an act of deadly force.

“Often these incidents happen very quickly and that officer has to make a split-second decision that can potentially be life or death – not just for the officer but for those in the community in which we serve,” said said Roberts. .

Capt. David Roberts said the Marion County Sheriff’s Office already had a strict use-of-force policy before the bill passed.

MORE | Bill Moves Forward to Expand What Indiana Must Disclose in Child Abuse Deaths

He said any form of pressure on a person’s neck is unacceptable to his department unless it is a life or death scenario.

It means “any type of choking pressure that would restrict oxygen or the airway,” Roberts said.

sergeant. Andy Cree of the Tippecanoe County Sheriff’s Office said the agency’s use-of-force policy was also stricter than Indiana state law requires.

“We define this not just as airway but also as blood flow,” Cree said.

MORE | Indiana ban on transgender athletes sparks growing backlash

Both departments say dozens of hours are spent on use-of-force training, whether in the classroom, practicing virtual scenarios, or learning on-the-spot pressure point techniques, and more. They also focus on mental health.

“We all realize that jail is often not the right place for all offenders,” Roberts said.

Cree said more than 11,400 hours were spent on training from 2016 to 2018.

“From 2019 to 2021 under Sheriff Goldsmith (he) nearly doubled to 27,350 hours,” Cree said.

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Tiny Transitions offers pediatric sleep coaching specifically for twins https://abilitiesnetworks.org/tiny-transitions-offers-pediatric-sleep-coaching-specifically-for-twins/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 18:35:40 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/tiny-transitions-offers-pediatric-sleep-coaching-specifically-for-twins/ Tiny Transitions, a national leader in infant and toddler sleep coaching, now offers personalized coaching to help twins sleep through the night. Getting a baby to sleep is hard enough, but twins can increase the difficulty exponentially. Tiny Transitions has a solution with personalized sleep coaching specifically tailored to the unique needs of twins. Katherine […]]]>

Tiny Transitions, a national leader in infant and toddler sleep coaching, now offers personalized coaching to help twins sleep through the night.

Getting a baby to sleep is hard enough, but twins can increase the difficulty exponentially. Tiny Transitions has a solution with personalized sleep coaching specifically tailored to the unique needs of twins.

Katherine Fehily of Texas runs Tiny Transitions’ sleep coaching program for twins and is affectionately known as “the restorative”. She is a mechanical engineer turned mom who had three children under the age of 3, the youngest of whom were twins.

“When I found out I was going to have twins, panic set in, so I decided the best way to really learn how to train my kids to sleep was to jump in and become a sleep consultant, which was the best choice I made.”

Fehily received intensive training through Tiny Transitions, putting her skills to work in her own home to get her twins to sleep through the night when she was 4.5 months old.

She now offers in-person sleep coaching in and around her hometown of Dallas, Texas, as well as virtual coaching for parents around the world.

“The hardest part of putting twins to bed is when they go off schedule, and you never get a break because a child is always awake,” Fehily said. “There is also the problem of having them in the same room. One will wake the other up and both will be tired and grumpy, and most families don’t have the space to give them separate bedrooms.

Fehily leverages her background in mechanical engineering as well as her experience with dozens of different sleeping methods to overcome these challenges.

“Each child is unique and their sleep plan should meet them where they are. I take my root cause analysis experience and apply it to each individual set of twins. I can then customize a plan to help them get the rest they need as quickly as possible,” Fehily said.

Fehily is part of Tiny Transitions’ Slumber Squad, a network of sleep consultants from across the country. They offer in-person or online coaching to train infants and toddlers to sleep through the night and overcome sleep regression. Their training is rooted in finding psychologists, physician assistants, social workers, lactation counselors, and doulas.

Courtney Zentz, president and founder of Tiny Transitions, said insomnia is a significant setback for American families, with 71% of infants waking up at least once in the night.

“Insomnia creates chaos and clutter in homes and affects cognitive and mental health,” Zentz said. “Our mission is to get families on consistent and predictable sleep schedules so they can function at their best.”

Zentz was named one of Tuck’s Top 200 Sleep Professionals and has been named “Best of Philadelphia” sleep consultant four times. She is also viewed by media such as Parentology, Romper, Fatherly, Yahoo, Thrive Global, etc. For more information about Tiny Transitions personalized sleep coaching for twins, visit www.TinyTransitions.com.

About Small Transitions

Tiny Transitions aims to help families adopt healthy sleep habits and restore order in their homes. They offer a very unique approach to sleep coaching and training.

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Teaching Your Child That “Revenge” Is Wrong https://abilitiesnetworks.org/teaching-your-child-that-revenge-is-wrong/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/teaching-your-child-that-revenge-is-wrong/ It can be overwhelming when parents stop to think about all they need to teach their children in life. If mom sat down and started writing down each specific thing she needed to teach and show her child, she would probably stop writing before she was done. That’s because it’s a lot, but since most […]]]>

It can be overwhelming when parents stop to think about all they need to teach their children in life. If mom sat down and started writing down each specific thing she needed to teach and show her child, she would probably stop writing before she was done. That’s because it’s a lot, but since most of it happens automatically, you rarely think about it. That’s until a situation arises that requires a good lesson, and that’s when it can get tough. Things like empathy, generosity, and patience are harder concepts to teach than walking and potty riding.


Revenge is a term that few parents would use with their children because it has such a negative connotation. However, if Mom takes a moment to observe, she will notice that her children often retaliate. If they have a sibling picking up their toy or pushing them, they quickly react the same way. This is revenge, and it’s important to make sure our kids know that revenge won’t always serve them well, and that there are other ways to resolve conflict that won’t have an impact. on their mental health.

RELATED: What Is Revenge Bedtime Procrastination and How Does It Affect Moms?


Why does it feel good?

There’s no denying that revenge feels good. Even as adults, when someone hurts us, our first instinct may be to think of a way to “get it back”, we want someone to hurt us the same way they hurt us. , and even if we don’t want to admit it, it feels good. There is no reason to think that it is not the same with children.

According to Medical Xpress, a previous study was done which saw that when people were wronged and thought about revenge, a brain scan showed that the brain’s reward centers fired up, showing a biological response to the idea of ​​revenge. However, another study showed that if revenge was acted upon, a person’s mood was negatively affected right after. To show that it is in the interest of our children that we teach them to avoid revenge.


Understand that revenge hurts

According to Filter Free Parents, before reacting to your child’s need for revenge, it is important to remember that revenge is hurt, and this is how a person expresses that they have been hurt. When a child seeks revenge, it is because he has been hurt and his hurt is trying to get out of his body. When children are young, the best thing to do is to show them love.

When a sibling picks up their toy or hits it, the first thing to do is show it some love. Pick them up and ask them if they want a “hug” from you. This will often help calm them down, because when children feel loved, their feelings of pain will disappear. When the hurt leaves their body, their need for revenge also disappears.


Communication

It’s always important to pay attention to how you react when people hurt you because children learn from you and you are their greatest inspiration. If they see you seeking and acting out revenge, they will follow. According to positive discipline, it’s important to break the cycle of revenge with children, and it starts with parents. It is important that we teach them, and model, that words are much more effective in resolving conflict. When we use our words and communicate with someone who has hurt us, it can help us make sure our feelings are heard and no one is hurt anymore by the situation.


Sources: Medical Xpress, Filter Free Parents, positive discipline


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National Guard soldiers now replace teaching in New Mexico https://abilitiesnetworks.org/national-guard-soldiers-now-replace-teaching-in-new-mexico/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 15:08:02 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/national-guard-soldiers-now-replace-teaching-in-new-mexico/ In a sunny classroom at Pojoaque Valley Middle School in northern New Mexico, a class of energetic teenagers do a group reading exercise. Specialist Austin Alt paces, looking over their shoulders. It’s her second day as a substitute teacher and her arrival was a surprise. “I went to one of my classes and saw him […]]]>

In a sunny classroom at Pojoaque Valley Middle School in northern New Mexico, a class of energetic teenagers do a group reading exercise. Specialist Austin Alt paces, looking over their shoulders. It’s her second day as a substitute teacher and her arrival was a surprise.

“I went to one of my classes and saw him there. I was a bit shocked at first,” said 14-year-old Joshua Villalobos.

As of this week, 78 members of the New Mexico National Guard began working as substitute teachers. They are responding to a call from Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham, who also asked state employees to volunteer in an effort to keep schools open during an acute teacher shortage exacerbated by the omicron wave of COVID-19. .

Alt is 25 and has no teaching experience, usually working as a technician in the Los Alamos labs. He says he volunteered after watching his younger brothers struggle with remote learning.

“Online content just doesn’t reach them properly,” he says, and many children don’t have access to a fast internet connection. “And also, people may have to leave the kids at home, like — alone. Like, that’s not the safest thing to do.”

Alt says he had a few hours of training and a background check before his first assignment – teaching a music class. He didn’t feel fully prepared.

“I was anxious. I didn’t know what to expect,” he says. But the students were kind to him, “welcoming me and being very respectful and so on. They taught me a lot about learning music,” he laughs. “It was a learning experience on both sides.”

The students say they love Alt and have no problem with a substitute soldier if it means the school stays open. During the omicron wave, there were even fewer teachers than usual.

“It’s quite stressful,” says Villalobos. He hasn’t learned much during remote learning and says going back to school has been difficult. “I was a little nervous. Like, we got there, I didn’t speak to anyone, neither of us really knew each other. Like, if the teacher called me, I wasn’t really going to know what she was about. was talking.” He now feels a lot more confident.

School principal Mario Vigil says the poorest students suffer the most when the school closes. The Kids Count 2021 data book indicates that New Mexico ranks 48th in the nation in child poverty. According to the non-profit organization Feeding America, one in five children go hungry.

“It was very difficult for our students to be home alone,” he says. “We have families that are working class families that have one, maybe two, sometimes three jobs, and they’re busy working and putting food on the table.”

But keeping the school open is becoming increasingly difficult as more teachers retire or resign, devastated by remote learning and dealing with students affected by loneliness, difficulties or the grief.

“We ask them to be counsellors,” says Vigil, “we ask them to be teachers, we ask them to be guardians. exhaust.”

Education Secretary Kurt Steinhaus praises teachers who have adapted to the pandemic. “These teachers stepped in and worked overtime, worked weekends,” he says. But as the months pass, “our teachers are saying, I’m tired. I’ve been in this emotional wagon here for so long that I just can’t go on. And so it’s really hard there.”

He says there is now a shortage of more than 1,000 teachers, which is “the biggest challenge in terms of numbers that we have ever had”, with the number having more than doubled since the start of the pandemic.

When Steinhaus took the job last year, he told the governor he wanted to do everything he could to keep schools open, first to try to improve student achievement. “In areas of high poverty, student achievement dropped dramatically when we went to totally remote areas,” he says.

And second, and more importantly, the “social, emotional, mental health, behavioral health, there are a lot of words for that. But that’s how kids feel about themselves.”

Inviting the National Guard and state employees into schools is, he concedes, a “crisis measure”, but worth it because, “some children, the family is not stable, but the school is stable. There is someone to rely on, there is food”. in many of our schools it is breakfast and lunch. »

Not everyone agrees that poorly trained volunteers are the solution.

“I thought it was a nice gesture, but I think it’s completely impractical,” says Jennifer Barnwell, a teacher in the town of Carrizozo. “The only way it’s going to be a help is if these people can plan their curriculum, meet the standards, know how to run a classroom effectively with classroom management, if they can meet the emotional needs of these kids, I mean, are they going to do that?”

Others working to reduce criminal convictions and incarceration of young people have raised concerns about military personnel in classrooms. Activist Xiuhtecutli Soto of the New Mexico Youth Justice Coalition said in an email that he thought the initiative “could be harmful to young people because it can be used as a method to further militarize and control young people.”

There are plans to recruit and retain qualified teachers. Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham has proposed a big pay rise for educators. New Mexico ranks 32nd nationally in average teacher salary. But right now, during this crisis, the governor has volunteered to be a substitute teacher herself.

“What’s happening to our children right now is likely to affect them for many, many years,” Steinhaus says. “And we have to work really hard to make sure they’re emotionally connected with at least one adult.”

Copyright 2022 KUNM. To see more, visit KUNM.

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Chabad directors to meet at training retreats https://abilitiesnetworks.org/chabad-directors-to-meet-at-training-retreats/ Sun, 30 Jan 2022 14:58:27 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/chabad-directors-to-meet-at-training-retreats/ Two school leadership training retreats — one for Menahelim and another for Menahelos — will be held in February in Atlanta and Florida, hosted by the Menachem Education Foundation (MEF). Full story What does it take to run a successful school in today’s educational climate where student needs are constantly changing? While this issue is […]]]>

Two school leadership training retreats — one for Menahelim and another for Menahelos — will be held in February in Atlanta and Florida, hosted by the Menachem Education Foundation (MEF). Full story

What does it take to run a successful school in today’s educational climate where student needs are constantly changing?

While this issue is front and center for so many parents, teachers and leaders, the Menachem Education Foundation (MEF) took the opportunity to organize two school leadership training retreats – one for Menahelim and another for Menahelos – both scheduled to take place this February.

The Menahelei Mosdos Chinuch Training Retreat, designed to train Chabad school leaders of Chedarim and Yeshivos to conduct the Chinuch in their moisad, will take place Monday-Tuesday February 7-8/ו-ז אדרא. The workshops will take place at the Chaya Mushka Children’s House, a thriving Chabad elementary school in Atlanta, Georgia. This will be the first of a four-part series, with future retreats taking place in Iyar 5782, summer 5782 and early 5783.

The program will be moderated by Rabbi Mendy GreenbaumPrincipal of the School of Cheder Menachem and Bais Chaya Mushka in Los Angeles, California, and Rabbi Mendy Levin, Principal at Cheder Chabad Philadelphia. Workshops will focus on how to solve problems, analyze data from the school environment, and practice protocols to develop leadership and communication skills.

This program is the 10th cohort of MEF’s leadership training for Menahelim. More than a dozen Menahelim have registered, adding to the 102 former graduates. Rabbi Levi Kaplan, Menahel of Cheder Chabad of Monsey, shares that training as a principal through the Menachem Education Foundation has “transformed my job, empowered me to learn, and given me the edge I need to to be Matzliach in my Shlichus of Chinuch”. Interested Menahalim can still register at mymef.org/mmc.

For women leading Chabad schools, the MEF is creating a retreat with a different focus, addressing their most current needs. The program, which runs February 20-21 / י “ט-כ אדר א, features the theme “Reaching Their Hearts and Minds – Empowering Yourself as an Educational Leader to Build a School That Can Reach the Whole of Child.” Workshops will be hosted by Chabad of Coral Springs, with school visits to the Lubavitch Hebrew Academy and nearby Rohr Bais Chaya.

The MEF has organized many mental health awareness programs for Mechanchos and Menahelos, and the School Leaders Retreat will showcase the enhanced tracks, especially for school leaders.

Featured presentations will be the heart of CHINUCH – social-emotional learning for school leaders with Ms. Henny Bartfieldand crisis intervention in Chabad schools with Mrs. Dena GorkinCPP of the Bnos Chomesh Academy, and Mrs. Francois Gitty LCSW of Houston, TX. The retreat will also include collaborative and inspiring programs. Menahalos can register at www.mymef.org/leadershipretreat.

“The Chabad Chinuch community is extremely vibrant, with so many talented, new and experienced school leaders,” shares MEF Founder and Executive Director Rabbi Zalman Shneur. “We are honored to have the opportunity to bring together the best in our community to learn from each other’s best practices in order to provide a top-notch Chinuch for today’s students. We are privileged to facilitate networking and collaboration among those who lead the most sacred Shlichus of Chinuch.

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