high school – Abilities Networks http://abilitiesnetworks.org/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 04:35:13 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-4.png high school – Abilities Networks http://abilitiesnetworks.org/ 32 32 Valley News – Out & About: Windsor County mentoring grows https://abilitiesnetworks.org/valley-news-out-about-windsor-county-mentoring-grows/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 04:35:13 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/valley-news-out-about-windsor-county-mentoring-grows/ Published: 03/14/2022 00:32:51 Modified: 03/14/2022 00:32:10 WINDSOR — For nearly half a century, adult mentors have helped children in Windsor County meet life’s challenges. Now, Windsor County Mentors are extending their reach across the river to Sullivan County to help youth ages 5-18. “People really came out of nowhere saying ‘we have kids, we have […]]]>

Published: 03/14/2022 00:32:51

Modified: 03/14/2022 00:32:10

WINDSOR — For nearly half a century, adult mentors have helped children in Windsor County meet life’s challenges.

Now, Windsor County Mentors are extending their reach across the river to Sullivan County to help youth ages 5-18.

“People really came out of nowhere saying ‘we have kids, we have kids, we have kids,'” said Matthew Garcia, executive director of the Windsor-based nonprofit. “Surprisingly, we were overwhelmed with the response.”

Now the staff is trying to recruit volunteers who want to work with young people, especially in Claremont and Newport. While the organization had long wanted to expand, Garcia said the plans came to fruition when he was approached by people in Sullivan County. community and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Health, which provided them with a $15,000 grant to launch the program.

“In my job, I was really talking to a lot of people in the community, a lot of school staff, law enforcement, anybody and everybody I could talk to,” said Deryn Smith, Partnership Coordinator. in Community Health at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Population Health and Substance Abuse Prevention Coordinator for the Greater Sullivan County Regional Public Health Network. “Overall, everyone was on the same page that young people need mentors.”

The problem was that no one had the capacity or ability to create a mentorship program from scratch. Instead, Smith reached out to Garcia who shared his goal of expanding into Sullivan County.

“People said there was a need and we said ‘hey, let’s see if we can meet that need,'” Garcia said.

Both Smith and Garcia said it has worked well so far.

“It was honestly perfect timing,” Smith said. “The reaction and response we’ve had from people in the community about the startup has been amazing. So we’re super excited and proud of that.

Since the program launched earlier this year, staff from schools, recreation services and the Family Treatment Court, among other institutions, have referred dozens of children who would benefit from mentoring.

“The list of kids who will use this program is so long,” Smith said. “Recruiting the kids was super easy, but it’s definitely harder to get those reliable adults.”

Garcia said the organization already has a pool of interested mentors and matches with the kids will begin in the coming weeks.

“We look at the interests of the child and the adult and try to put them together,” Garcia said.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, child referrals had slowed and mentors were eager to resume volunteering. Typically, the organization has between 40 and 60 pairs. Mentors must be 21 years of age or older. They go through a thorough background check process. Once matched, they are asked to spend two hours a week with their mentees. If pairing is through a school, this time is one hour per week and the pairs meet at the student’s school.

“We try to match a mentor and mentee as close geographically as possible because we want them to be able to come together,” Garcia said.

While the organization requires a mentor to commit for a year, it’s not uncommon for these pairs to be together for five or six years. Smith pointed to evidence that shows young people who have adult mentors are more likely to graduate from high school and less likely to engage in substance abuse.

“It means having a reliable connection that they could meet with, learn from, feel safe, talk about what’s going on at home, at school, any stressors in their lives,” he said. she declared. “Mentoring in general has such a good outcome.”

Editor’s Note: For more information about volunteering and to complete an application, visit wcmentors.org, email info@wcmentors.org, or call 802-674-5101. Liz Sauchelli can be reached at esauchelli@vnews.com or 603-727-3221.

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Why this coaching hire is so important to the younger generation of fans https://abilitiesnetworks.org/why-this-coaching-hire-is-so-important-to-the-younger-generation-of-fans/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 18:59:53 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/why-this-coaching-hire-is-so-important-to-the-younger-generation-of-fans/ As a member of the “younger generation”, I have seen the ultimate highs and lows of Kansas State basketball. I remember not even paying attention to the team as a young kid in the Kansas City area when Jim Woolridge was in charge. It was easy to just ignore it when the losses […]]]>


As a member of the “younger generation”, I have seen the ultimate highs and lows of Kansas State basketball. I remember not even paying attention to the team as a young kid in the Kansas City area when Jim Woolridge was in charge. It was easy to just ignore it when the losses were rampant and ongoing. So, like many fans my age, most of whom are finishing college or just starting their young adult lives, K-State basketball didn’t exist until a certain coach by the name of Bob Huggin came to town.

Even then, though they made improvements and Huggins and his all-star lineup of assistant coaches recruited future K-State legends like Michael Beasley, Bill Walkerand Jacob Pullen for the following season, the roster he inherited was still on the outside. In his only season in Manhattan, his team failed to make the NCAA Tournament. While many K-State fans and media widely acknowledge that this is the first season where K-State finally turned things around, many young fans like me wouldn’t have gotten their first taste of what would truly be K-State basketball lore until Bob Huggin returned home to West Virginia and in the process directed K-State to a fiery Miami-born young man by the name of Frank Martin.

Martin would take over, convincing Walker, who had worn a redshirt the previous season due to injury, to stay. He also convinced the nation’s number one rookie, Beasley, to come to the Little Apple, as he did with Pullen.

My first vivid memory of K-State basketball would be the memory that cemented my childhood fandom. That memory dates back to 2008 when Martin and company knocked out KU at home in Bramlage Coliseum to end the streak. After 20 years of programs going in opposite directions, Kansas State had finally eliminated the Jayhawks and in doing so welcomed a whole new generation of fans while officially reviving the old and proud tradition that is basketball. of Kansas State.

Frank Martin continued his success for five years before former athletic director John Curries chased him away and took him in Bruce Weber. Although Martin never won a conference title, he won more than 20 games in Manhattan’s five seasons and appeared in the NCAA Tournament four out of five seasons. This success would relaunch the program and gain full buy-in from everyone, including young fans who would grow up idolizing guys like Pullen, Thomas Gipson, DJ Johnson, Rodney McGruder, Curtis Kelly, Jordan Henriquezand Denis Clement among many others.

After Martin’s departure and Weber’s hiring, much of the fan base was divided over the decision. Kicking out a coach as highly regarded as Martin was not a popular decision, and hiring Weber after being fired from Illinois was even less appreciated. The younger generation, many of whom were now in high school, stayed the course. Winning was all that mattered and if Weber could do that, he could retain the support of a group of fans who had grown accustomed to winning but never really understood the history of the program.

In the early years, Weber would win a Big 12 championship and compete in the NCAA Tournament, but after a meltdown he missed the tournament for two straight years and barely made it the following year. While many fans clamored for his firing, young fans persisted, confident that next year would be the year K-State would once again become the dominant program they had seen for seven years after Huggins’ departure. After all, can you blame them? Winning is all they knew.

Their patience was rewarded because Bruce Weber struck gold with dean wade, Barry Brownand Kamau Stokes. This group would go on to make an Elite 8 race and win another Big 12 championship. Those original fans who hated Weber’s hire and hated it even more after the first meltdown had no choice but to be all -in now. Weber had most, if not all, of the fan support, especially that “young” group of fans who were now classmates and friends with many of the players Weber recruited to bring K-State back to national prominence. This younger generation who had seen Beasley and Pullen as children now considered the legends of Wade and Brown to be the mainstays of K-State basketball and they were 100% invested.

However, as it happened the first time, the good would end. Three straight years of mediocre basketball putting Bruce Weber on the chopping block and now Kansas State is looking for a new head coach. After those long and hard three seasons, many fans decided to refuel and move on. Not this younger generation though. Many of those fans still came to Bramlage every night, anticipating disappointment but still cheering on their team because they remembered the not so distant past. They remembered the good times and how they felt. They said “if this team gets hot, watch out”, even though they knew the likelihood of that happening was slim to none. This optimism was present in all of their fandoms. But, for many, this season was the straw that broke the camel’s back.

Student attendance was down, and it became painfully clear that K-State basketball was in decline. The hope was still there, but many of those same fans who supported Weber after his first meltdown knew a change was needed. While the fanbase is now in full agreement that a change is due, some fans who watched K-State hire Tom Asbury and Jim Woolridge know that this program could easily go in the wrong direction. But for young fans, those who saw Martin get hired, who saw Weber have immediate success, this hire is so important.

It’s a chance to bring in those young fans who may now have young families to redeem. It’s a chance to make an impression on another young group of fans who have only seen K-State wrestling. This hiring of a new basketball coach is more than just trying to win basketball games. This is a chance to revitalize the university and send it on an upward trajectory where the past will be just that, the past.

With a solid player to build around Pack Nijel, the new coach has an All Big 12 guard to build. One of the best players to come through K-State since the aforementioned Beasleys, Pullens and Browns, Pack can serve as a bridge to the next generation of winners. While the Transfer Portal and NIL change everything, having a fundamental piece like Pack can help turn K-State into a winner much faster than some might think. For younger fans, Pack is Pullen and he’s just waiting for a solid coach and surrounding cast. Getting the right parts is the next step, but finding the right trainer is the first challenge.

Finding the “right guy” is a lot easier said than done, there’s no doubt. But, this young group of fans just wants a winner. They want a leader. K-State has the opportunity to do the right thing and bring in someone who can change the course of the program once again, but if they don’t they will lose another generation of fans, one that has seen nothing but success in K-State basketball. This hiring is extremely important and, as a wise man who rebuilt the University from the ground up once said, “not to be taken lightly.”

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MSU’s Waller Receives President’s Distinguished Teaching Award | MSUToday https://abilitiesnetworks.org/msus-waller-receives-presidents-distinguished-teaching-award-msutoday/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 22:17:58 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/msus-waller-receives-presidents-distinguished-teaching-award-msutoday/ A Michigan State University faculty member known for his scholarship, commitment and innovation in the classroom recently received the university’s highest teaching honor during a surprise visit to class of university leaders and colleagues. To enthusiastic applause, MSU President Samuel L. Stanley Jr., MD, presented the 2022 President’s Distinguished Teaching Award to John Waller, associate […]]]>

A Michigan State University faculty member known for his scholarship, commitment and innovation in the classroom recently received the university’s highest teaching honor during a surprise visit to class of university leaders and colleagues.

To enthusiastic applause, MSU President Samuel L. Stanley Jr., MD, presented the 2022 President’s Distinguished Teaching Award to John Waller, associate professor of the history of medicine. Stanley was joined by Vice Provost Mark Largent, College of Social Sciences Dean Mary Finn, Associate Dean Walter Hawthorne and others.

“Supporting the success of our students is MSU’s most critical mission, and it is brilliantly reflected every day by our world-class faculty in their classrooms and beyond,” Stanley said. “I am proud to convey the university’s esteem for such an exemplary researcher and teacher as Dr. Waller with this award. And it’s so appropriate to announce it like this, in front of his students.

The annual award recognizes faculty who demonstrate, among other qualities, energy and enthusiasm for engaging students and empowering them to embrace change, extend learning beyond the classroom, and influence others to improve their teaching by sharing their knowledge.

“I’m very touched and honored and slightly embarrassed,” Waller joked to laughter from his students and visitors, jokingly steadying himself in a nearby chair. Calling the honor a group effort, Waller singled out the contributions of Jenn Arbogast, the academic specialist he says was “absolutely instrumental” in building his flagship program, the Social Science Researchers Programsince its creation in 2013.

Waller has built an impressive career of teaching, scholarship, and publishing. Specializing in the history of medicine, he has published seven books that explore the nature of scientific discovery, the lives of child factory workers in the 19th century, the history of American medicine, and the mass psychogenic illness expressed by compulsive dancing in the 16th century, among other subjects. Waller holds a bachelor’s degree in modern history, a master’s degree in human biology, another master’s degree in the history of science and medicine, and a doctorate in the history and philosophy of science.

Hawthorne, who oversees Waller’s work in the Social Scientist Program, cited in his appointment letter Waller’s energy and enthusiasm, ability to translate complex ideas, impressive appraisals and accolades, its interdisciplinarity and commitment to diversity, among other traits.

“Waller sees lessons in the ‘traditional’ classroom as a step toward empowering students to shape their own lives and impact the lives of others,” Hawthorne said. “Through lectures and seminars, it inspires students to tackle big ideas and ways to meet the world’s great challenges.”

The Social Science Scholars Program recruits approximately 20 promising high school students to take one interdisciplinary seminar per semester for two years in a group setting, participate in a study abroad program, and complete an internship.

“The Social Scientist Program, and his leadership within it, is one of the defining characteristics of our college,” Finn said. “Each year, we are excited to see what will come out of the program. Dr. Waller embodies what a scholar-teacher can be.

The program is a compendium of Waller’s pedagogical approach: participatory, intellectually humble and tirelessly curious. In addition to being available in class, Waller is known for his home consultations with students on essays, grants, and research, often late into the evening. Waller has been particularly successful in encouraging his students to fight for and win prestigious national and international awards.

Per tradition and the stipulations of the award, the President confers the President’s Distinguished Teaching Award during unannounced classroom visits. Stanley’s group was joined by retired economics professor Carl Liedholm, who created the endowed prize with his wife, Margaret. Liedholm said it was crucial that the president “get down on the factory floor” and present the award himself – which Stanley clearly liked.

“I really appreciate the chance to see you all,” Stanley told Waller’s class. “It really validates the choice to be here in person with you when I see your excitement and enthusiasm for John to receive this award.”

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Hilliard-based soccer club Olimpia USA relies on bilingual training https://abilitiesnetworks.org/hilliard-based-soccer-club-olimpia-usa-relies-on-bilingual-training/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 19:21:43 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/hilliard-based-soccer-club-olimpia-usa-relies-on-bilingual-training/ Like most youth football coaches, Wilmer and Amy Gonzales of Olimpia USA Soccer teach their players how to dribble and pass. But when they founded their Hilliard-based football club in 2017, they had another goal in mind: a bilingual approach to set it apart from other organizations in central Ohio. “The football community is a […]]]>

Like most youth football coaches, Wilmer and Amy Gonzales of Olimpia USA Soccer teach their players how to dribble and pass.

But when they founded their Hilliard-based football club in 2017, they had another goal in mind: a bilingual approach to set it apart from other organizations in central Ohio.

“The football community is a pretty tight-knit community,” Amy Gonzales said, so she and her husband decided to create a website for Olimpia with text in both English and Spanish.

“We can also speak fluent Spanish to parents (or family members) who call us,” she said.

The bilingual approach affects the teams and the players.

Olimpia USA soccer coach Wilmer Gonzalez talks to his team before a February 5 match against Upper Arlington United at Stars Indoor Sports in North Columbus.

For example, in the U17 boys’ club team, some players are bilingual in English and Spanish and some are not, but they learn their cultures and language by playing together, Amy Gonzales said.

Recently, she says, several boys used a mobile app between games to communicate in English and Spanish rather than having someone else translate for them.

“Nobody asked them to do it; they just did it alone so they could all talk to each other,” she said.

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Pelham, Alabama’s Meagan Deese arrested, charged with abusing girl while coaching travel sports team – CONAN Daily https://abilitiesnetworks.org/pelham-alabamas-meagan-deese-arrested-charged-with-abusing-girl-while-coaching-travel-sports-team-conan-daily/ Sun, 27 Feb 2022 04:15:05 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/pelham-alabamas-meagan-deese-arrested-charged-with-abusing-girl-while-coaching-travel-sports-team-conan-daily/ Meagan Billingsley Deese, 30, from Pelham, Shelby County, Alabama, USA, is a former softball player and coach of a travel sports team. Besides Pelham, she has lived in other areas of Alabama, including Columbiana and Cottondale. As a softball player, Deese played for Ashley Phillips at Shelby County High School in Colombian. In 2007, Deese […]]]>

Meagan Billingsley Deese, 30, from Pelham, Shelby County, Alabama, USA, is a former softball player and coach of a travel sports team. Besides Pelham, she has lived in other areas of Alabama, including Columbiana and Cottondale.

As a softball player, Deese played for Ashley Phillips at Shelby County High School in Colombian. In 2007, Deese helped guide his team to the state tournament.

Meagan Billingsley Deese (©Hoover Police Department)

During Deese’s first season in the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH) in Huntsville, Madison County, Alabama in 2010, she saw time in 20 games as a reserve. That year, she scored 10 times as she was frequently used as a pinch runner.

In 2011, Deese started 41 games while appearing in 52 for the UAH Chargers in his second campaign. During her junior season in 2012, she recorded 40 starts and competed in 53 contests.

Deese is accused of abusing a minor from 2014 to 2016. The Pelham resident was a coach on the minor’s travel sports team.

On February 14, 2022, the alleged victim, who was already of age, told Hoover Police Department agents in Hoover, Alabama that she had been subjected to unwanted sexual touching by Deese over a period of two to three years. Detectives from the department’s Special Victims Unit opened an investigation and obtained warrants for several counts.

On February 23, 2022, Deese was arrested and incarcerated in the Jefferson County Jail in Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama. She was charged with first-degree sodomy, first-degree sexual abuse and inducing a child to enter a vehicle and a home for an immoral purpose.

Deese’s bail was set at $90,000. She was released from jail after posting bond.

Anyone with information about allegations of abuse against Meagan Billingsley Deese is asked to contact Sergeant Scott Prentiss at 205-739-6125.

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Huggins, Wyatt full football coaching staff https://abilitiesnetworks.org/huggins-wyatt-full-football-coaching-staff/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 13:29:57 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/huggins-wyatt-full-football-coaching-staff/ History links CHESTNUT HILL, Mass. – Boston College head football coach Jeff Hafley announced the promotion of Huggins Soap and the addition of Darrell Wyatt Saturday morning to complete his 2022 coaching staff. Huggins was elevated to running backs coach after spending 2021 as assistant running backs coach with the Eagles, while […]]]>

CHESTNUT HILL, Mass. – Boston College head football coach Jeff Hafley announced the promotion of Huggins Soap and the addition of Darrell Wyatt Saturday morning to complete his 2022 coaching staff. Huggins was elevated to running backs coach after spending 2021 as assistant running backs coach with the Eagles, while Wyatt takes over as running backs coach. wide receivers coach; the same position he held at Central Florida since 2018.

“We are delighted to welcome Darrell to our team and announce Savon’s promotion to a full-time coaching role,” Hafley said. “Darrell brings a wealth of experience from both the college and NFL ranks and has longstanding relationships in key recruiting areas for our program. It was important for us to have a veteran presence to lead the room. receivers.”

In four seasons at UCF, Wyatt spent three years working for head coach Josh Heupel and his final year with head coach Gus Malzhan. Meanwhile, the Knights have compiled a 37-12 record, including an undefeated regular season in 2018, and four bowl appearances, including the 2019 Fiesta Bowl. In 2021, UCF averaged 206, 2 passing yards and 31.9 points per game. Last year, Wyatt and the Knights produced two 500-yard receivers in Ryan O’Keefe (812) and Brandon Johnson (565). Johnson finished second in the American Athletic Conference with 11 touchdowns, while O’Keefe, who won second-team All-AAC, added seven. O’Keefe set a UCF single-season record with 84 receptions .

Wyatt coached a pair of UCF All-Americans in his first three seasons in Orlando with Gabriel Davis and Marlon Williams under his tutelage. Davis was a Buffalo Bills fourth-round pick in 2020 and compiled 70 receptions in two years in the NFL.

Prior to UCF, Wyatt served as an offensive assistant at Arkansas State in 2017. The Red Wolves produced a top-five offense and a top-20 finish during his season with the team. Previously, he was at Houston in 2016 as a wide receivers coach and recruiting coordinator and at Oklahoma State as an offensive analyst in 2015. The Cougars recorded a nine-win season in 2016, including a one-week win against No. 13 Oklahoma. In 2015, the Cowboys started 10-0 and finished with a win over No. 16 Ole Miss in the Sugar Bowl.

Wyatt was on the Texas coaching staff from 2011 to 2013 under Mack Brown. He served as offensive coordinator and wide receiver coach for the Longhorns in 2013, while serving as scouting coordinator and wide receiver coach in 2011 and 2012. While in Texas, Wyatt’s wide receivers earned five conference accolades All-Big 12. With the help of Wyatt as co-scouting coordinator, the 2012 Texas signing class was ranked No. 2 in the nation.

In 2008-09, Wyatt was associate head coach/offensive coordinator/receivers coach at Southern Mississippi. The Golden Eagles were No. 18 in the nation in offense and No. 31 in total offense in 2009. In 2008, Southern Miss broke 36 offensive school records en route to 20th in total offensive production in the nation.

Wyatt also has coaching experience with Kansas, Arizona, NFL Minnesota Vikings, Oklahoma, Baylor, Wyoming, Sam Houston State and Trinity Valley (Texas) Community College.

Wyatt graduated from Kansas State University, where he played for two seasons after transferring from Trinity Valley to Athens, Texas. He is originally from Killeen, Texas.

He and his wife Cindy are parents to a son, Desmond, and a daughter, Charese.

Huggins arrived on the high ground for the 2021 season after a brief stint as running backs coach in Massachusetts last spring. The former Rutgers running back worked with the BC running backs in the fall. Huggins got his start as a coach at Somerville High School (NJ), gained experience as an intern with the Miami Dolphins and broke into the college ranks at Buffalo in 2020 as an assistant wide receiver.

“Soap is someone I’ve known since I recruited him in high school,” Hafley added. “He has quickly established himself as one of the best young coaches in our game and a relentless scout and I’m delighted to see him mentor our running backs.”

At Somerville, Huggins worked as an offensive and defensive assistant as the team posted a 32-3 cumulative record between 2016 and 2018 and won a state title in 2017. After a scholarship with the Dolphins, he returned at his high school alma mater in St. Peter’s Prep (NJ) to win a state title as an offensive assistant.

As a player, Huggins spent four seasons at Rutgers and graduated in economics in three and a half years. He missed his senior year through injury after rushing for 842 yards, nine rushing touchdowns and 20 receptions in his first three seasons. The Scarlet Knights have bowled one game in all four years of his career. Huggins then earned his master’s degree from northern Iowa in sports psychology.

Huggins and his wife Victoria have son Zion and are expecting their second child this summer.

The Wyatt Coaching Experience

2018-21 Central Florida (wide receivers)
2017 Arkansas State (offensive assistant)
2016 Houston (Recruitment Coordinator/Wide Receivers)
2015 Oklahoma State (offensive analyst)
2013 Texas (offensive coordinator/wide receivers)
2011-12 Texas (recruiting coordinator/wide receivers)
2010 Kansas (Co-Offensive/Wide Receiver Coordinator)
2008-09 Southern Mississippi (Associate Head Coach/Offensive Coordinator/Wide Receivers)
2007 Arizona (passing game coordinator/wide receiver)
2006 Minnesota Vikings (wide receivers)
2005 Philadelphia Eagles (Trainee)
2005 Oklahoma (passing game coordinator/wide receiver)
2002-04 Oklahoma (wide receivers)
2001 Oklahoma State (passing game/wide receiver coordinator)
2000 Kansas (Associate Head Coach/Offensive Coordinator/Wide Receivers)
Denver Broncos 1998-99 (trainee)
1997-99 Kansas (assistant head coach/wide receivers)
1996 Tampa Bay Buccaneers (trainee)
1996 Baylor (wide receivers)
1995 Wyoming (wide receivers)
1992-94 Sam Houston State (wide receivers)
1989-91 Trinity Valley Community College (wide receivers)

The Huggins Workout Experience

2021 Boston College (assistant records)
Spring 2021 Massachusetts (Running Backs)
Buffalo 2020 (wide receiver assistant)
2019 St. Peter’s Prep (offensive coach)
2019 Miami Dolphins (Stage Bill Walsh – Running Backs)
2016-18 Somerville High School (offensive and defensive assistant)

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Being a coach’s kid isn’t easy – neither is coaching your kid | News https://abilitiesnetworks.org/being-a-coachs-kid-isnt-easy-neither-is-coaching-your-kid-news/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 21:17:11 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/being-a-coachs-kid-isnt-easy-neither-is-coaching-your-kid-news/ It’s not easy being a coach’s son. And it’s not easy for a coach to be the father of one of his players. While the experience certainly has its awkward moments, it’s a lifelong bonding experience for parent and child. I grew up playing for my dad in a variety of sports and then coached […]]]>

It’s not easy being a coach’s son. And it’s not easy for a coach to be the father of one of his players.

While the experience certainly has its awkward moments, it’s a lifelong bonding experience for parent and child. I grew up playing for my dad in a variety of sports and then coached my kids when they were growing up.

I miss those days, but I will always fondly remember the memories we made over those years, both as a son and then as a parent.

For Dublin High boys’ basketball coach Tom Costello, the years of coaching his sons Nick and TJ are coming to an end. Nick has already moved on to college, while TJ is a senior on the Gaels basketball team.

Costello also has two younger daughters – Sydney, a sophomore, and Riley, a middle schooler – and he has coached both, but we’ll talk about that later.

“It was an amazing time,” Tom said of training the two boys. “It’s something we will always remember.”

As the boys grew up, Tom was there to coach every sport the boys participated in, even soccer.

“He was a terrible football coach,” joked Nick, who is now playing his first season for the UC San Diego baseball team.

“I was a horrible football manager,” Tom confirmed. “I just gave them nicknames. When they asked for coaches, I said “OK, I’m in”.

But the important thing is that Tom was there, as he was for the boys throughout high school.

Nick, being the oldest, was the first to venture into the father-son/coach-player high school dilemma. To begin with, the children grew up in Pleasanton, attending K-8 school in Pleasanton.

But Tom was the college basketball coach in Dublin and when Nick reached eighth grade it was time to make a decision.

“That decision was a bit hairy,” Tom said of Nick choosing Dublin over Amador – the alma mater of his parents and uncles. “Nick was the pioneer. I told him that I didn’t want to coach against you. You have to make a decision, or I have to make a decision.

Nick chose to follow Tom and headed for Dublin. And then the dad being the coach, the chatter started.

“When you first walk onto campus, you’re the coach’s son,” Tom said. “No matter what you accomplish, it’s because you’re the coach’s son.”

According to Jennifer Costello, Tom’s wife and mother of the kids, Nick was the perfect start.

“I think with Nick, he just rolled with it,” Jenn said. “He’s a type of kid who goes with the flow.”

Nick going to Dublin, at least in his first year, significantly altered the Costello family’s daily schedule.

“The year Nick went to Dublin, I think my car got attached to my body,” Jenn said of transporting the kids to school, training and home. “We had Wi-Fi in the car, so the kids could still do their homework. One of the children always had a place he needed to be.

Nick’s freshman year in the sport wasn’t a major issue as he wasn’t in college. But during his sophomore year, Nick made the varsity basketball team.

“I was very careful not to put Nick in an awkward position,” Tom explained. “Nick had to earn every minute of his playing time. I wasn’t playing him as much as he should have been, and his teammates had to come up to me and ask me why Nick wasn’t playing more.

I remember seeing Nick play as a sophomore and there was no doubt that he belonged on the field. He and TJ are terrific athletes, easily in the top echelon of their respective EBAL classes.

But that doesn’t matter to some people who only see the coach’s son play and not their own.

Just like Jenn said, Nick handled it in stride.

“You always have these people who think your dad is the reason you play,” Nick said. “People are always going to think what they want to think. You can’t let that bother you.

TJ also had the option of going to school in Pleasanton or joining Nick and his father in Dublin. He was also ready for what comes with playing for your dad.

“It was the first time I played for him in a few years,” TJ said. “I was in – I’m not into all the drama.”

During a game in Monte Vista towards the end of the regular season, TJ was the butt of some not-so-kind taunts and barbs from MV fans.

“It was really my first taste,” TJ explained. “Sometimes it takes a heavy toll, but you just overcome it.”

The decision to attend Dublin was the right thing, with the positives far outweighing the negatives.

“Dublin High has been our life,” Jenn said. “They’ve been playing on this pitch since they were kids. It was really great fun to see them all together.

Still, those negatives are there.

It’s not just people at your own school who can be brutal, but students and parents at other schools who take the opportunity to go wild when Dublin comes to their school for a game, just like TJ has discovered in Monte Vista.

It wears Tom out when it happens.

“When the other team or the crowd sees them, they’re branded people,” Tom said of some of the boys’ experiences they’ve had with games on the road. “You feel bad for them and you feel responsible for putting them there. But they’ve both been through it and both are mentally stronger to be a coach’s kid.

Having your son play for you also has benefits. For example, the interaction with the boys and their teammates helped make Tom a better coach.

“We helped take care of the players,” Nick said. “We are more like messengers.”

Like helping Tom know what he needs to know about his players on a daily basis. As one of the students, as well as a teammate, they are more in tune with what is going on and that means keeping Tom up to date with any situation.

“A thousand percent,” Nick said. “I can’t tell you how many times I’ve done that. I walked into practice and my dad asked me if there was anything he needed to know. I would tell him to settle down with someone if he was having a bad day or check to see if someone was having a hard time. These are conversations that happened quickly. I knew my role.

TJ also agreed with Nick about being a sounding board between the team and their coach/dad.

“They know they can talk to me,” TJ said of his teammates. “They can get rid of some things and then I can talk to my dad. It’s like being a big brother. »

The two boys had different ways of making suggestions to their father regarding the team.

“Nick was very sneaky about making suggestions,” Tom said. “TJ, on the other hand, is the type to raise his hand in the middle of practice and say, ‘Hey coach, maybe we should try this’.”

“That’s absolutely right,” TJ said with a laugh. “But I was doing all of this with good intentions.”

Have there ever been times when the line between coach and father has blurred?

“We try to leave it in the car after we get home,” Tom said of most in-store chatter. “I try to be just a stay-at-home dad – they need both.”

A wonderful aspect of training your children is the memories you will take with you for the rest of your life. I went and it was great to hear Tom share the parts of the experience that made him smile.

“With Nick, the year we won EBAL in a double overtime game – the hug we got was everything,” Tom said. “With TJ, it was just starting to spend more time together. We got closer this year.

Now that TJ’s tenure in Dublin is coming to an end, Costello’s kids playing for dad time doesn’t necessarily have to come to an end.

Last year, with the odd spring COVID schedule, Tom had time off to assist with the Dublin varsity softball team, where Sydney got the starting shortstop spot as a rookie.

It also produced some hilarious memories.

While Nick and TJ rolled around with being a trainer’s son, Sydney took a different approach as a trainer’s daughter.

“She was very aware of that,” Tom said of his dad’s presence on the coaching staff. ” It was interesting. We’d come home and she’d be like, ‘Why did you say those lame quotes?’ Here, I was just trying to motivate the team.

Sydney laughs before answering if it’s true.

“Uh, well, not entirely,” Sydney said. “There were times when it was just dad and his sense of humor.”

Tom also must have laughed as he remembered another comment from Sydney.

“She told me there were 14 girls on the team who loved her and wanted to coach them next season, but there was one who didn’t,” Tom said, adding a good laugh.

Sydney mostly agreed.

“Everyone loved him,” Sydney said. “I was just thinking about him being my coach – keeping dad and coach separate. He is a good coach, he has a lot of wisdom.

As Riley prepares to enter high school, the future Dublin High football player moves the Costello family from the warm confines of the gym to winter nights outside.

“We’re not used to outdoor sports in the winter,” Jenn said. “It will require some adjustments.”

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Shaquille Holzem gives back by mentoring the A/L Boys and Girls Club https://abilitiesnetworks.org/shaquille-holzem-gives-back-by-mentoring-the-a-l-boys-and-girls-club/ Sun, 13 Feb 2022 05:00:58 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/shaquille-holzem-gives-back-by-mentoring-the-a-l-boys-and-girls-club/ Shaquille Holzem, the director of physical education for the Boys and Girls Clubs of the Auburn/Lewiston club in southern Maine, stands in the clubhouse gym on Wednesday as some of the youngsters he mentors play back- plan. Russ Dillingham/Sun Journal Shaquille Holzem’s passions are varied in subject matter but consistent in intensity. Recently transplanted to […]]]>

Shaquille Holzem, the director of physical education for the Boys and Girls Clubs of the Auburn/Lewiston club in southern Maine, stands in the clubhouse gym on Wednesday as some of the youngsters he mentors play back- plan. Russ Dillingham/Sun Journal

Shaquille Holzem’s passions are varied in subject matter but consistent in intensity. Recently transplanted to Auburn from Wisconsin, the 25-year-old director of physical education for the Boys and Girls Clubs of Southern Maine Auburn/Lewiston Clubhouse has combined his previous experience teaching environmental science with his enthusiasm for sport to connect with the community and set an example for its youth.

Is there a story behind your name? Are your parents big basketball fans? I can’t help but think it has something to do with the work you’re doing today. My name is a very rare and unique name. My dad played ball in college and grew up loving it. I come from a family of DIE HARD LAKER fans. My parents loved Shaquille O’Neal. He is obviously a very nice and amazing person also outside of work: creation of an affordable shoe brand for children, his many gifts. When I worked at my old club Shaquille O’Neal was actually a partner of Boys & Girls Clubs of America and I had a nice poster of him hanging in my gym.

What are some of the programs and activities unique to your work? We really try to encourage our members to learn about healthy and active lifestyles. We do more than physical activities and games. I preach sportsmanship and creating a positive environment for growth and development. More than half of our teen members report doing physical activity five times a week. Our teenagers really love basketball and it’s the first thing they do when they come to the club. They come straight to the gym where we play all over the world and focus on shooting form. In addition to club sports, we offer a Healthy Habits program designed for all age groups.

I’ve been working with our youth for seven years and I love what I do. What brought me to work in this Boys and Girls Club is what the organization stands for. There are a lot of underrated young people in the world. I know a boys and girls club provides young people with a safe place to go, a hot meal (which I needed as a kid). We all need a place where we feel loved, appreciated and heard. I went to a club as a kid and remember all the staff I grew up with and the impact they had on me. I want to give back to those who need it most. To help guide our youth to a bright future and empower them to be themselves.

Shaquille Holzem, director of physical education at Boys & Girls Clubs of Southern Maine’s Auburn/Lewiston Clubhouse. Russ Dillingham/Sun Journal

What other club programs are there? We have programs in four areas: health and wellness, academics, arts and leadership. I personally run a program called Passport to Manhood where I teach our 11 to 13 year olds how to be upstanding citizens and good neighbours. We have a wide variety of programs that really lean into the educational side and prepare our young people for what comes next in life. We have programs for all ages. I went to a boys and girls club as a kid and it baffles me to see where we are now. The growth from 10 years ago to now is great.

Does the club have any community service programs you have participated in or in general? As part of our leadership programs, middle and high schools will lead community service projects throughout the year. This weekend, I personally participated in a basketball event that raised money for a family in need. One of our teenage members who prefers to go through DD also helped. She is also our recipient of the Youth of the Year award, which is one of the most prestigious awards you can receive. It was an incredible four hours filled with great basketball runs.

Can you describe the impact the club has had on the Lewiston Auburn community? There are 41,000 children in Maine who have nowhere to go after school. We provide LA children and teens with a safe and supportive space where they can learn and grow. I worked for a club for three years about seven years ago and realized that this organization was something I wanted to be part of. Here I am seven years later where it all started in a Boys & Girls Club. The Boys & Girls Club is truly a wonderful place that provides many opportunities for our young people to grow and become future leaders. Our goal is for members to graduate from high school on time with a plan for their future.


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For Concord-area youth, mentoring can create lifelong connections https://abilitiesnetworks.org/for-concord-area-youth-mentoring-can-create-lifelong-connections/ Sat, 12 Feb 2022 23:36:52 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/for-concord-area-youth-mentoring-can-create-lifelong-connections/ The first time Michael Franklin met Andy Julian, he was a little worried. At 13, Franklin was wary of new people and didn’t know what to expect from the mentorship program he joined at his grandmother’s suggestion. Nor had he realized that Julian, a veterinarian, had nine dogs, four cats, six horses, goats, llamas, alpacas […]]]>

The first time Michael Franklin met Andy Julian, he was a little worried.

At 13, Franklin was wary of new people and didn’t know what to expect from the mentorship program he joined at his grandmother’s suggestion. Nor had he realized that Julian, a veterinarian, had nine dogs, four cats, six horses, goats, llamas, alpacas and sheep in his Canterbury home.

“I was like, ‘That’s a lot of animals,'” Franklin recalled with a laugh. “I was a bit nervous, especially with all the dogs barking. But I’m a really good dog person.

Julian and Franklin were paired as a mentor and mentee five years ago through the Friends Youth Mentorship Program, which matches Merrimack County children ages 6 to 17 with a mentor who can serve positive role model and advocate.

On a recent Thursday, Franklin, who is now 17 and a senior at Merrimack Valley High School, and Julian, who is 61, sat in a sunny corner of a McDonald’s on Fisherville Road in Penacook – the same spot where they met on their first day of mentoring. Julian, who was a first-time mentor when he was paired with Franklin, says he joined the program because he wanted to make a difference and offer a young person advice he didn’t have. maybe not at home. Franklin, who lives with his grandmother, said he joined the program because he didn’t have a father figure in his life.

“I wasn’t in the best place, but I didn’t want to tell anyone that I didn’t know everything, about how I felt and about my life,” Franklin said. “When I finally had a connection, he helped me.”

Over the past five years, Julian and Franklin have hiked, played disc golf and drank countless cups of coffee. Julian taught Franklin how to drive a car – including a manual transmission – and helped him get the practice hours he needed for his license. They did house repair projects, working on small houses to renovate. Franklin even completed his senior project observing at Pembroke Veterinary Hospital, Julian’s veterinary practice, where he observed animal exams, surgeries, and euthanasia.

Now Franklin says he considers Julian his father, and Julian – who has two daughters – refers to Franklin as the son he never had.

“Whenever I meet someone for the first time, I always hesitate about them, like I can’t trust them. But I slowly started to trust them and open up to them” Franklin said, “It’s pretty cool that I was his first mentee and he was my first mentor. It means a lot. It certainly wasn’t a mistake to match us.”

The need for mentors is high in the Concord area as the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted recruitment numbers and the organization’s outreach capabilities. Lily Wellington, director of volunteer programs at the Friends Program, says they currently have a waiting list of 80 children looking for mentors.

The program was originally established in 1975 as “junior-senior friends”, to provide role models for young people involved in the juvenile justice system or on the cusp of it. Today, the program has an average of 100 active mentor pairs per year. Many of the children involved are from new American families.

“Some 30 years later, we are now operating with the same theory, which is that if you provide a positive and caring role model invested in the development of an at-risk youth, you can make a big difference to those outcomes,” Wellington said. .

All mentors go through a selection process that includes an application, interview, home visit, background check and driving check, are matched with a child based on common interests or skills, and are asked to spend about one to three hours a week with their mentee.

Julian says one thing he’s learned is that he can be a mentor just by being himself, without having to do anything “spectacular”.

“Pick up the phone and call them. You don’t have to embark on a grand adventure,” Julian said. “Sometimes I pick him up, we have coffee and that’s about it, or walk the dogs or something.”

Franklin plans to graduate from high school, after which he hopes to study criminal justice at NHTI and Franklin Pierce University. He has big dreams of becoming a police officer who values ​​diversity, has the skills to defuse mental health crisis situations, and is not afraid to risk his life to help people in times of need.

“What motivates me is just knowing that I can make an impact,” Franklin said. “Even though I’m just one person, I can just spread positivity to everyone and they spread it and say, ‘This officer is a good officer. ”

The Friends program only requires a one-year committee from its participants, but many choose to go beyond that. Julian and Franklin both agree that they will have a lifelong friendship. They are already discussing plans to renovate more old houses in the future.

“It’s not like, ‘Oh, the program is over, see you later,'” Julian said. “He’s my son now, so I’ll be there for him forever.”

Those interested in signing up to become mentors can learn more at www.friendsprogram.org.

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Coaches Corner: Good coaching is key to raising the bar in high school women’s basketball | News, Sports, Jobs https://abilitiesnetworks.org/coaches-corner-good-coaching-is-key-to-raising-the-bar-in-high-school-womens-basketball-news-sports-jobs/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 01:25:11 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/coaches-corner-good-coaching-is-key-to-raising-the-bar-in-high-school-womens-basketball-news-sports-jobs/ Sammy Jo Hester Timpanogos head coach Kawika Akina talks to his players during a time out during the women’s basketball game between Maple Mountain and Timpanogos High School on Thursday, Dec. 3, 2015 at Timpanogos High School. Maple Mountain beat Timpanogos High School. SAMMY JO HESTER, Daily Herald Timpanogos head […]]]>




For the past three weeks, I’ve talked about raising the bar for women’s basketball. Now let’s get into a real conversation here.

What does it really take to raise the bar?

For me, it starts with the coaches.

We need more coaches who teach and develop kids with the tools to succeed on the pitch. Whether you’re a high school coach, bantam, club, or just a parent coach, we need to step up our game to help these kids really grow.

Springville players attempt to defend an inbound pass from Spanish Fork during the Region 9 game at Spanish Fork on Friday, Feb. 4, 2022. (Jared Lloyd, Daily Herald)

This has been a hot topic for years.

When you get into youth basketball coaching, you’re not doing it for the money. There is no money in it. You do it out of a pure love of basketball and working with kids.

So can we really ask a lot of a coach in this situation? What person is going to put in 20-25 hours a week in a high school coaching job that doesn’t pay? You have daily workouts for two hours, with match days being seven hours.

This is only a fraction of it. You also have grade checks, meetings with players, parents, admins, and the media, and putting out the fires of drama happening with the team (trust me, there will be fires you need to put out! ).

You’ll spend hours watching a movie and breaking down the game you just played or spotting the next opponent. Then you need to create a training or game plan for the next day: what do we need to work on since the last game or training? What are we insisting on today? Where are we physically and mentally? What are we doing today to prepare them for the next game?

Spanish Fork head coach Brynlie Nielsen leads his team during the Region 9 game against Springville at Spanish Fork on Friday, Feb. 4, 2022. (Jared Lloyd, Daily Herald)

Then, in real life, you have your job from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., which you can’t have if you’re a coach. It must be something that will allow you to be in training between 1pm and 6pm, depending on the day, and between 2pm and 9pm on match days.

Oh, and let’s not forget your family.

Here’s the kicker: you’re doing all of this for just $2,200 a year. That’s the most I’ve ever been paid.

It should give you a different perspective from your high school coach.

Commitment is tough, but we still need to have high expectations for the coach and trust that the administration has hired the best candidate who will develop your child and build a successful program.

Cedar Valley head coach Tony Ingle leads his team during the Region 7 game against Payson at Eagle Mountain on Thursday, Feb. 3, 2022. (Jared Lloyd, Daily Herald)

They decided they wanted to be coaches, so they better be competitive and prepared. They better do what they ask of their children, which is to work hard to improve their skills.

As a coach, you can improve by studying the game, strategies and patterns. You must be prepared for any scenario or situation, and make the necessary adjustments in games and practices.

This is a big flaw that I see in the game today. Not enough adjustments made during gameplay.

I sometimes fall victim to this, but I take great pride in making adjustments to plays, defenses and strategy.

I always change things and add things on the fly. If I see a way to exploit what the other team is doing, I’ll make that change.

Or if we’re exploited, then you better believe I’ll make a change.

I also think there needs to be more skill development in practices and even pre-match warm-ups.

I think kids need to shoot and handle the ball more in training. It’s where they can develop confidence in their shot or in their handling of the ball, so when it comes time for the game, they’re ready to do it.

In most gyms today there are eight baskets, so queues for exercises should be short. This way every kid gets a ton of reps because development is about getting reps.

That’s why I mentioned pre-match warm-ups. This is another opportunity to have the children rehearse.

But when I look, I see the kids maybe only getting 10 shots in 20 minutes, often waiting in Disneyland queues.

They work on 3 on 2 and 2 on 1 drills. In these drills they don’t attack the rim hard and don’t create a shot or foul.

How many times are you going to be in this situation, especially at the pace of warm-ups?

All the blame is not on the coach.

We also need to empower the players.

Did they prepare enough before the start of the season? After a bad game, did they leave early or stay late after training to work on it?

As for me, when I hear complaints, I often hear about problems and excuses.

I don’t want to hear them.

Let’s not look for excuses. Instead, let’s do something about it.

How do we do that?

The way to do that is to watch a movie and really see what happened – because the movie doesn’t lie.

I don’t let my children play this role of victim. I always say, “Well, you can cry about it or you can do something about it. I’m not about the problems, I’m about the solutions.

Most of the time when they watch a movie, they realize that’s not what they thought happened. Now you can slow things down to view, rewind or pause. During the game, you cannot do this.

After the game you watch a movie and you can show them what they can do next time to be in a better position to finish or make a game. Their recall memory is not there yet for most children , and when you can show them and they see it, they will have a better understanding of it.

The next time they are in these situations, they will be better prepared. This will help a lot more than telling them during or after the game.

I have a bigger impact on my players when I watch a movie with them. That’s one of the reasons why I don’t say much during the games I watch. Most of the time, I don’t even talk about basketball during games.

Working hard is one element, but you add working smart and now you will start to see real growth happen. Studying the game through the movie and getting the reps up when and where it works smart.

Let’s all do our part to raise the bar for women’s basketball.

This is the last week of regional games for the 5A and 6A teams before the start of their state tournament. Slices for 2A will be finalized on February 12 and their state tournament will begin on February 15.

Go out and watch these girls fight to the bitter end.

Games to watch

February 15: Skyridge at Pleasant Grove (5:15 p.m.), Jordan at Timpview (7 p.m.) and Maple Mountain at Springville (7 p.m.)

February 17: Lehi at Timpview (7 p.m.)

February 18: Westlake to Lone Peak (5:15 p.m.)

Follow me on Instagram, @coachveeks where I post updates and match clips. #girlcoach



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