head coach – Abilities Networks http://abilitiesnetworks.org/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 18:59:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-4.png head coach – Abilities Networks http://abilitiesnetworks.org/ 32 32 Why this coaching hire is so important to the younger generation of fans https://abilitiesnetworks.org/why-this-coaching-hire-is-so-important-to-the-younger-generation-of-fans/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 18:59:53 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/why-this-coaching-hire-is-so-important-to-the-younger-generation-of-fans/ As a member of the “younger generation”, I have seen the ultimate highs and lows of Kansas State basketball. I remember not even paying attention to the team as a young kid in the Kansas City area when Jim Woolridge was in charge. It was easy to just ignore it when the losses […]]]>


As a member of the “younger generation”, I have seen the ultimate highs and lows of Kansas State basketball. I remember not even paying attention to the team as a young kid in the Kansas City area when Jim Woolridge was in charge. It was easy to just ignore it when the losses were rampant and ongoing. So, like many fans my age, most of whom are finishing college or just starting their young adult lives, K-State basketball didn’t exist until a certain coach by the name of Bob Huggin came to town.

Even then, though they made improvements and Huggins and his all-star lineup of assistant coaches recruited future K-State legends like Michael Beasley, Bill Walkerand Jacob Pullen for the following season, the roster he inherited was still on the outside. In his only season in Manhattan, his team failed to make the NCAA Tournament. While many K-State fans and media widely acknowledge that this is the first season where K-State finally turned things around, many young fans like me wouldn’t have gotten their first taste of what would truly be K-State basketball lore until Bob Huggin returned home to West Virginia and in the process directed K-State to a fiery Miami-born young man by the name of Frank Martin.

Martin would take over, convincing Walker, who had worn a redshirt the previous season due to injury, to stay. He also convinced the nation’s number one rookie, Beasley, to come to the Little Apple, as he did with Pullen.

My first vivid memory of K-State basketball would be the memory that cemented my childhood fandom. That memory dates back to 2008 when Martin and company knocked out KU at home in Bramlage Coliseum to end the streak. After 20 years of programs going in opposite directions, Kansas State had finally eliminated the Jayhawks and in doing so welcomed a whole new generation of fans while officially reviving the old and proud tradition that is basketball. of Kansas State.

Frank Martin continued his success for five years before former athletic director John Curries chased him away and took him in Bruce Weber. Although Martin never won a conference title, he won more than 20 games in Manhattan’s five seasons and appeared in the NCAA Tournament four out of five seasons. This success would relaunch the program and gain full buy-in from everyone, including young fans who would grow up idolizing guys like Pullen, Thomas Gipson, DJ Johnson, Rodney McGruder, Curtis Kelly, Jordan Henriquezand Denis Clement among many others.

After Martin’s departure and Weber’s hiring, much of the fan base was divided over the decision. Kicking out a coach as highly regarded as Martin was not a popular decision, and hiring Weber after being fired from Illinois was even less appreciated. The younger generation, many of whom were now in high school, stayed the course. Winning was all that mattered and if Weber could do that, he could retain the support of a group of fans who had grown accustomed to winning but never really understood the history of the program.

In the early years, Weber would win a Big 12 championship and compete in the NCAA Tournament, but after a meltdown he missed the tournament for two straight years and barely made it the following year. While many fans clamored for his firing, young fans persisted, confident that next year would be the year K-State would once again become the dominant program they had seen for seven years after Huggins’ departure. After all, can you blame them? Winning is all they knew.

Their patience was rewarded because Bruce Weber struck gold with dean wade, Barry Brownand Kamau Stokes. This group would go on to make an Elite 8 race and win another Big 12 championship. Those original fans who hated Weber’s hire and hated it even more after the first meltdown had no choice but to be all -in now. Weber had most, if not all, of the fan support, especially that “young” group of fans who were now classmates and friends with many of the players Weber recruited to bring K-State back to national prominence. This younger generation who had seen Beasley and Pullen as children now considered the legends of Wade and Brown to be the mainstays of K-State basketball and they were 100% invested.

However, as it happened the first time, the good would end. Three straight years of mediocre basketball putting Bruce Weber on the chopping block and now Kansas State is looking for a new head coach. After those long and hard three seasons, many fans decided to refuel and move on. Not this younger generation though. Many of those fans still came to Bramlage every night, anticipating disappointment but still cheering on their team because they remembered the not so distant past. They remembered the good times and how they felt. They said “if this team gets hot, watch out”, even though they knew the likelihood of that happening was slim to none. This optimism was present in all of their fandoms. But, for many, this season was the straw that broke the camel’s back.

Student attendance was down, and it became painfully clear that K-State basketball was in decline. The hope was still there, but many of those same fans who supported Weber after his first meltdown knew a change was needed. While the fanbase is now in full agreement that a change is due, some fans who watched K-State hire Tom Asbury and Jim Woolridge know that this program could easily go in the wrong direction. But for young fans, those who saw Martin get hired, who saw Weber have immediate success, this hire is so important.

It’s a chance to bring in those young fans who may now have young families to redeem. It’s a chance to make an impression on another young group of fans who have only seen K-State wrestling. This hiring of a new basketball coach is more than just trying to win basketball games. This is a chance to revitalize the university and send it on an upward trajectory where the past will be just that, the past.

With a solid player to build around Pack Nijel, the new coach has an All Big 12 guard to build. One of the best players to come through K-State since the aforementioned Beasleys, Pullens and Browns, Pack can serve as a bridge to the next generation of winners. While the Transfer Portal and NIL change everything, having a fundamental piece like Pack can help turn K-State into a winner much faster than some might think. For younger fans, Pack is Pullen and he’s just waiting for a solid coach and surrounding cast. Getting the right parts is the next step, but finding the right trainer is the first challenge.

Finding the “right guy” is a lot easier said than done, there’s no doubt. But, this young group of fans just wants a winner. They want a leader. K-State has the opportunity to do the right thing and bring in someone who can change the course of the program once again, but if they don’t they will lose another generation of fans, one that has seen nothing but success in K-State basketball. This hiring is extremely important and, as a wise man who rebuilt the University from the ground up once said, “not to be taken lightly.”

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Huggins, Wyatt full football coaching staff https://abilitiesnetworks.org/huggins-wyatt-full-football-coaching-staff/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 13:29:57 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/huggins-wyatt-full-football-coaching-staff/ History links CHESTNUT HILL, Mass. – Boston College head football coach Jeff Hafley announced the promotion of Huggins Soap and the addition of Darrell Wyatt Saturday morning to complete his 2022 coaching staff. Huggins was elevated to running backs coach after spending 2021 as assistant running backs coach with the Eagles, while […]]]>

CHESTNUT HILL, Mass. – Boston College head football coach Jeff Hafley announced the promotion of Huggins Soap and the addition of Darrell Wyatt Saturday morning to complete his 2022 coaching staff. Huggins was elevated to running backs coach after spending 2021 as assistant running backs coach with the Eagles, while Wyatt takes over as running backs coach. wide receivers coach; the same position he held at Central Florida since 2018.

“We are delighted to welcome Darrell to our team and announce Savon’s promotion to a full-time coaching role,” Hafley said. “Darrell brings a wealth of experience from both the college and NFL ranks and has longstanding relationships in key recruiting areas for our program. It was important for us to have a veteran presence to lead the room. receivers.”

In four seasons at UCF, Wyatt spent three years working for head coach Josh Heupel and his final year with head coach Gus Malzhan. Meanwhile, the Knights have compiled a 37-12 record, including an undefeated regular season in 2018, and four bowl appearances, including the 2019 Fiesta Bowl. In 2021, UCF averaged 206, 2 passing yards and 31.9 points per game. Last year, Wyatt and the Knights produced two 500-yard receivers in Ryan O’Keefe (812) and Brandon Johnson (565). Johnson finished second in the American Athletic Conference with 11 touchdowns, while O’Keefe, who won second-team All-AAC, added seven. O’Keefe set a UCF single-season record with 84 receptions .

Wyatt coached a pair of UCF All-Americans in his first three seasons in Orlando with Gabriel Davis and Marlon Williams under his tutelage. Davis was a Buffalo Bills fourth-round pick in 2020 and compiled 70 receptions in two years in the NFL.

Prior to UCF, Wyatt served as an offensive assistant at Arkansas State in 2017. The Red Wolves produced a top-five offense and a top-20 finish during his season with the team. Previously, he was at Houston in 2016 as a wide receivers coach and recruiting coordinator and at Oklahoma State as an offensive analyst in 2015. The Cougars recorded a nine-win season in 2016, including a one-week win against No. 13 Oklahoma. In 2015, the Cowboys started 10-0 and finished with a win over No. 16 Ole Miss in the Sugar Bowl.

Wyatt was on the Texas coaching staff from 2011 to 2013 under Mack Brown. He served as offensive coordinator and wide receiver coach for the Longhorns in 2013, while serving as scouting coordinator and wide receiver coach in 2011 and 2012. While in Texas, Wyatt’s wide receivers earned five conference accolades All-Big 12. With the help of Wyatt as co-scouting coordinator, the 2012 Texas signing class was ranked No. 2 in the nation.

In 2008-09, Wyatt was associate head coach/offensive coordinator/receivers coach at Southern Mississippi. The Golden Eagles were No. 18 in the nation in offense and No. 31 in total offense in 2009. In 2008, Southern Miss broke 36 offensive school records en route to 20th in total offensive production in the nation.

Wyatt also has coaching experience with Kansas, Arizona, NFL Minnesota Vikings, Oklahoma, Baylor, Wyoming, Sam Houston State and Trinity Valley (Texas) Community College.

Wyatt graduated from Kansas State University, where he played for two seasons after transferring from Trinity Valley to Athens, Texas. He is originally from Killeen, Texas.

He and his wife Cindy are parents to a son, Desmond, and a daughter, Charese.

Huggins arrived on the high ground for the 2021 season after a brief stint as running backs coach in Massachusetts last spring. The former Rutgers running back worked with the BC running backs in the fall. Huggins got his start as a coach at Somerville High School (NJ), gained experience as an intern with the Miami Dolphins and broke into the college ranks at Buffalo in 2020 as an assistant wide receiver.

“Soap is someone I’ve known since I recruited him in high school,” Hafley added. “He has quickly established himself as one of the best young coaches in our game and a relentless scout and I’m delighted to see him mentor our running backs.”

At Somerville, Huggins worked as an offensive and defensive assistant as the team posted a 32-3 cumulative record between 2016 and 2018 and won a state title in 2017. After a scholarship with the Dolphins, he returned at his high school alma mater in St. Peter’s Prep (NJ) to win a state title as an offensive assistant.

As a player, Huggins spent four seasons at Rutgers and graduated in economics in three and a half years. He missed his senior year through injury after rushing for 842 yards, nine rushing touchdowns and 20 receptions in his first three seasons. The Scarlet Knights have bowled one game in all four years of his career. Huggins then earned his master’s degree from northern Iowa in sports psychology.

Huggins and his wife Victoria have son Zion and are expecting their second child this summer.

The Wyatt Coaching Experience

2018-21 Central Florida (wide receivers)
2017 Arkansas State (offensive assistant)
2016 Houston (Recruitment Coordinator/Wide Receivers)
2015 Oklahoma State (offensive analyst)
2013 Texas (offensive coordinator/wide receivers)
2011-12 Texas (recruiting coordinator/wide receivers)
2010 Kansas (Co-Offensive/Wide Receiver Coordinator)
2008-09 Southern Mississippi (Associate Head Coach/Offensive Coordinator/Wide Receivers)
2007 Arizona (passing game coordinator/wide receiver)
2006 Minnesota Vikings (wide receivers)
2005 Philadelphia Eagles (Trainee)
2005 Oklahoma (passing game coordinator/wide receiver)
2002-04 Oklahoma (wide receivers)
2001 Oklahoma State (passing game/wide receiver coordinator)
2000 Kansas (Associate Head Coach/Offensive Coordinator/Wide Receivers)
Denver Broncos 1998-99 (trainee)
1997-99 Kansas (assistant head coach/wide receivers)
1996 Tampa Bay Buccaneers (trainee)
1996 Baylor (wide receivers)
1995 Wyoming (wide receivers)
1992-94 Sam Houston State (wide receivers)
1989-91 Trinity Valley Community College (wide receivers)

The Huggins Workout Experience

2021 Boston College (assistant records)
Spring 2021 Massachusetts (Running Backs)
Buffalo 2020 (wide receiver assistant)
2019 St. Peter’s Prep (offensive coach)
2019 Miami Dolphins (Stage Bill Walsh – Running Backs)
2016-18 Somerville High School (offensive and defensive assistant)

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NFL Rumors: Ex-Giants wide receiver Ike Hilliard lines up new coaching job https://abilitiesnetworks.org/nfl-rumors-ex-giants-wide-receiver-ike-hilliard-lines-up-new-coaching-job/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 17:48:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/nfl-rumors-ex-giants-wide-receiver-ike-hilliard-lines-up-new-coaching-job/ Former New York Giants receiver Ike Hilliard is on the road. Action Network’s Brett McMurphy reports “Ike Hilliard, Pittsburgh Steelers WR coach, named WR coach at Auburn. Hilliard was a former WR star in Florida. Tigers head coach Bryan Harsin welcomed Hilliard to Auburn: “Ike is exactly what we are looking for to lead our […]]]>

Former New York Giants receiver Ike Hilliard is on the road.

Action Network’s Brett McMurphy reports “Ike Hilliard, Pittsburgh Steelers WR coach, named WR coach at Auburn. Hilliard was a former WR star in Florida.

Tigers head coach Bryan Harsin welcomed Hilliard to Auburn:

“Ike is exactly what we are looking for to lead our wide receiver room. His credentials really speak for themselves – SEC All-American, NFL first-round pick, 12 years as a highly productive player in the league, and more than a decade as an NFL coach.” Harsin said. “Among all these accomplishments, one thing really stood out, showing who Ike is as a person and a leader. He was committed to his family to graduate from college, and he never lost sight of that. , completing his degree while serving as a full-time NFL coach. Without a doubt, Ike possesses the same values ​​that we want our Auburn program to be known for – character, discipline, tenacity and conviction. We are thrilled to welcome Ike, his wife Lourdes and their children in the Auburn family.

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Hilliard, 45, joined the Steelers ahead of the 2020 season. At the time, Pittsburgh head coach Mike Tomlin was looking to replace Darryl Drake, who died in August 2019. Ray Sherman replaced receivers coach wide from the Steelers for the 2019 season.

According to the Steelers website, Hilliard was the receivers coach for the Washington Redskins from 2014 to 2019. Prior to that, he was the receivers coach for the Buffalo Bills (2013). Hilliard also completed a year-long stint in Washington in 2012. His NFL coaching career began in 2011 as an assistant for the Miami Dolphins.

Hilliard spent his first eight NFL seasons with the Giants, after being the seventh overall pick in the 1997 NFL Draft. In 98 games with the Giants, Hilliard had 368 receptions for 4,630 yards and 27 touchdowns .

Hilliard spent the last four seasons of his career with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

Thank you for counting on us to deliver journalism you can trust. Please consider supporting us with a subscription.

Mike Rosenstein can be reached at mrosenstein@njadvancemedia.com.

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Dolphins head to Championships with new coaching staff – The Free Press https://abilitiesnetworks.org/dolphins-head-to-championships-with-new-coaching-staff-the-free-press/ Sun, 20 Feb 2022 00:00:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/dolphins-head-to-championships-with-new-coaching-staff-the-free-press/ As the Dolphins head toward the end of the short course season, the team has beefed up its coaching staff. In February, Spencer Robertson joined the team as the new assistant coach. Spencer Robertson grew up swimming competitively for HYACK in Coquitlam. He specialized in backstroke and then breaststroke, excelling in the 200 meter events. […]]]>

As the Dolphins head toward the end of the short course season, the team has beefed up its coaching staff. In February, Spencer Robertson joined the team as the new assistant coach.

Spencer Robertson grew up swimming competitively for HYACK in Coquitlam. He specialized in backstroke and then breaststroke, excelling in the 200 meter events. Eventually he moved on to the Marlins, a summer club, where he also began coaching. Robertson is highly recommended by this program.

Spencer Robertson and his wife Karen moved to Fernie in 2019, seeking work-life balance. “We wanted to start a family and were drawn to the lifestyle of raising a child in a small town.” Their wish came true with the birth of their son Kai, in January 2021. The training schedule fits perfectly with Robertson’s commitment to parenthood.

“I love swimming,” says Robertson. He remembers being drawn to the sport from an early age. In addition to his competition and training time, he was also a lifeguard for twelve years.

Robertson says he’s drawn to coaching because of all the lessons it has to offer kids. “I love seeing the dedication of children and seeing that dedication turn into rewards.”

Robertson’s goal for the club is “to make beautiful, graceful swimmers, then speed comes naturally.” Robertson especially wants to help Fernie athletes develop a feel for the water. “You can’t exactly teach the feel of water, but you can guide swimmers to it.”

Shortly after Robertson joined the club, Aidan Chudleigh returned in the role of head coach. Chudleigh had already started doing junior coaching planning and mentoring from Australia before Christmas, after being away from Fernie for over a year. He then returned to the deck on Monday, February 14.

Chudleigh intended to return home to Australia on a more permanent basis, but found he missed Fernie, particularly the connection to the outdoors and the workforce. The Elk Valley Dolphins were thrilled to welcome him back. Chudleigh’s enthusiasm, expertise in sport, connection to athletes, creative practices and energetic commitment to the team make him a deeply valued leader.

“I’m looking forward to building on all the great work that’s been done this season,” said Chudleigh.

Several Dolphins will compete in the BC Northern and Interior Divisional Championship the weekend of Feb. 26 under coach Aidan.

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Coaches Corner: Good coaching is key to raising the bar in high school women’s basketball | News, Sports, Jobs https://abilitiesnetworks.org/coaches-corner-good-coaching-is-key-to-raising-the-bar-in-high-school-womens-basketball-news-sports-jobs/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 01:25:11 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/coaches-corner-good-coaching-is-key-to-raising-the-bar-in-high-school-womens-basketball-news-sports-jobs/ Sammy Jo Hester Timpanogos head coach Kawika Akina talks to his players during a time out during the women’s basketball game between Maple Mountain and Timpanogos High School on Thursday, Dec. 3, 2015 at Timpanogos High School. Maple Mountain beat Timpanogos High School. SAMMY JO HESTER, Daily Herald Timpanogos head […]]]>




For the past three weeks, I’ve talked about raising the bar for women’s basketball. Now let’s get into a real conversation here.

What does it really take to raise the bar?

For me, it starts with the coaches.

We need more coaches who teach and develop kids with the tools to succeed on the pitch. Whether you’re a high school coach, bantam, club, or just a parent coach, we need to step up our game to help these kids really grow.

Springville players attempt to defend an inbound pass from Spanish Fork during the Region 9 game at Spanish Fork on Friday, Feb. 4, 2022. (Jared Lloyd, Daily Herald)

This has been a hot topic for years.

When you get into youth basketball coaching, you’re not doing it for the money. There is no money in it. You do it out of a pure love of basketball and working with kids.

So can we really ask a lot of a coach in this situation? What person is going to put in 20-25 hours a week in a high school coaching job that doesn’t pay? You have daily workouts for two hours, with match days being seven hours.

This is only a fraction of it. You also have grade checks, meetings with players, parents, admins, and the media, and putting out the fires of drama happening with the team (trust me, there will be fires you need to put out! ).

You’ll spend hours watching a movie and breaking down the game you just played or spotting the next opponent. Then you need to create a training or game plan for the next day: what do we need to work on since the last game or training? What are we insisting on today? Where are we physically and mentally? What are we doing today to prepare them for the next game?

Spanish Fork head coach Brynlie Nielsen leads his team during the Region 9 game against Springville at Spanish Fork on Friday, Feb. 4, 2022. (Jared Lloyd, Daily Herald)

Then, in real life, you have your job from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., which you can’t have if you’re a coach. It must be something that will allow you to be in training between 1pm and 6pm, depending on the day, and between 2pm and 9pm on match days.

Oh, and let’s not forget your family.

Here’s the kicker: you’re doing all of this for just $2,200 a year. That’s the most I’ve ever been paid.

It should give you a different perspective from your high school coach.

Commitment is tough, but we still need to have high expectations for the coach and trust that the administration has hired the best candidate who will develop your child and build a successful program.

Cedar Valley head coach Tony Ingle leads his team during the Region 7 game against Payson at Eagle Mountain on Thursday, Feb. 3, 2022. (Jared Lloyd, Daily Herald)

They decided they wanted to be coaches, so they better be competitive and prepared. They better do what they ask of their children, which is to work hard to improve their skills.

As a coach, you can improve by studying the game, strategies and patterns. You must be prepared for any scenario or situation, and make the necessary adjustments in games and practices.

This is a big flaw that I see in the game today. Not enough adjustments made during gameplay.

I sometimes fall victim to this, but I take great pride in making adjustments to plays, defenses and strategy.

I always change things and add things on the fly. If I see a way to exploit what the other team is doing, I’ll make that change.

Or if we’re exploited, then you better believe I’ll make a change.

I also think there needs to be more skill development in practices and even pre-match warm-ups.

I think kids need to shoot and handle the ball more in training. It’s where they can develop confidence in their shot or in their handling of the ball, so when it comes time for the game, they’re ready to do it.

In most gyms today there are eight baskets, so queues for exercises should be short. This way every kid gets a ton of reps because development is about getting reps.

That’s why I mentioned pre-match warm-ups. This is another opportunity to have the children rehearse.

But when I look, I see the kids maybe only getting 10 shots in 20 minutes, often waiting in Disneyland queues.

They work on 3 on 2 and 2 on 1 drills. In these drills they don’t attack the rim hard and don’t create a shot or foul.

How many times are you going to be in this situation, especially at the pace of warm-ups?

All the blame is not on the coach.

We also need to empower the players.

Did they prepare enough before the start of the season? After a bad game, did they leave early or stay late after training to work on it?

As for me, when I hear complaints, I often hear about problems and excuses.

I don’t want to hear them.

Let’s not look for excuses. Instead, let’s do something about it.

How do we do that?

The way to do that is to watch a movie and really see what happened – because the movie doesn’t lie.

I don’t let my children play this role of victim. I always say, “Well, you can cry about it or you can do something about it. I’m not about the problems, I’m about the solutions.

Most of the time when they watch a movie, they realize that’s not what they thought happened. Now you can slow things down to view, rewind or pause. During the game, you cannot do this.

After the game you watch a movie and you can show them what they can do next time to be in a better position to finish or make a game. Their recall memory is not there yet for most children , and when you can show them and they see it, they will have a better understanding of it.

The next time they are in these situations, they will be better prepared. This will help a lot more than telling them during or after the game.

I have a bigger impact on my players when I watch a movie with them. That’s one of the reasons why I don’t say much during the games I watch. Most of the time, I don’t even talk about basketball during games.

Working hard is one element, but you add working smart and now you will start to see real growth happen. Studying the game through the movie and getting the reps up when and where it works smart.

Let’s all do our part to raise the bar for women’s basketball.

This is the last week of regional games for the 5A and 6A teams before the start of their state tournament. Slices for 2A will be finalized on February 12 and their state tournament will begin on February 15.

Go out and watch these girls fight to the bitter end.

Games to watch

February 15: Skyridge at Pleasant Grove (5:15 p.m.), Jordan at Timpview (7 p.m.) and Maple Mountain at Springville (7 p.m.)

February 17: Lehi at Timpview (7 p.m.)

February 18: Westlake to Lone Peak (5:15 p.m.)

Follow me on Instagram, @coachveeks where I post updates and match clips. #girlcoach



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Bills hires household name for coaching staff https://abilitiesnetworks.org/bills-hires-household-name-for-coaching-staff/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 23:57:35 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/bills-hires-household-name-for-coaching-staff/ The Buffalo Bills are preparing for the start of free agency and the NFL Draft. General manager Brandon Beane and head coach Sean McDermott have their work cut out for them, as the Bills have plenty of players ready to enter the open market as unrestricted free agents. But first, the Bills need to make […]]]>

The Buffalo Bills are preparing for the start of free agency and the NFL Draft. General manager Brandon Beane and head coach Sean McDermott have their work cut out for them, as the Bills have plenty of players ready to enter the open market as unrestricted free agents.

But first, the Bills need to make sure their coaching staff is in place, and the Bills had an important position to fill on the offensive side of the ball.

Former offensive line coach Bobby Johnson was brought to the New York Giants as the new offensive line coach, after former offensive coordinator Brian Daboll left to become the Giants head coach, with general manager Joe Schoen.

The Bills have apparently found their next offensive line coach.

According to journalist Brooke Kromer (who is Aaron Kromer’s daughter), Aaron Kromer will be the Bills’ next offensive line coach.

Kromer is a household name for Bills fans. He was Buffalo’s offensive line coach from 2015 to 2016, when Rex Ryan was head coach.

Kromer has coached in the NFL and college for the past 30 years and spent time as the Chicago Bears’ offensive coordinator from 2013–14; and was the interim head coach of the New Orleans Saints for six games in 2012. He was most recently the running play coordinator and offensive line coach of the Los Angeles Rams, from 2018 to 2020.

Kromer has a ton of experience and he’s also a running game guru, so hopefully him at Buffalo means the Bills can run the ball more effectively, although they will most likely remain a pass-first team.

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Perez, Flowers and Randall share a lifelong bond after coaching together at Reading High https://abilitiesnetworks.org/perez-flowers-and-randall-share-a-lifelong-bond-after-coaching-together-at-reading-high/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 01:41:27 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/perez-flowers-and-randall-share-a-lifelong-bond-after-coaching-together-at-reading-high/ Rick Perez and Matt Flowers have known each other for nearly 30 years, when they were kids in Muhlenberg. They coached boys basketball at Reading High together for more than a decade and picked up Jai-T Randall, their “big brother,” along the way. The three worked together to guide the Red Knights to their first […]]]>

Rick Perez and Matt Flowers have known each other for nearly 30 years, when they were kids in Muhlenberg.

They coached boys basketball at Reading High together for more than a decade and picked up Jai-T Randall, their “big brother,” along the way. The three worked together to guide the Red Knights to their first PIAA championship five years ago.

Now they are all head coaches, Flowers at Muhlenberg, Randall at Allentown Dieruff and Perez still at Reading. They will have a reunion of sorts on Saturday when they lead their teams in three consecutive games at the Geigle Classic.

“It will be very emotional,” Flowers said. “It shows what we have all worked to do. It shows all the work we have done. It shows the love we put in our children. It shows that we have learned a lot under Coach Perez and have grown. It’s like a statement that when you work hard you can spread your wings.

The showcase event begins at noon at the Geigle Complex with the Reading High girls playing Allentown Allen before five boys matches: Allen vs. Lower Merion at 1:30am, McCaskey vs. Hazleton at 3am, Dieruff vs. Central Dauphin East at 4:30am, Muhlenberg vs. Susquehanna Township at 6 and Reading High v Archbishop Wood at 7:30 in a rematch of the 2021 PIAA Class 6A title match won by the Red Knights.

“Why shouldn’t we be in this situation,” said Randall, 44, “having a chance to come back to the Geigle, coach a different team but recognize that this will always be our home? There remains a legacy of hard work and the passion we had for the community, the children and each other.

Perez, 40, and Flowers, 38, first met at a basketball game at a park in Muhlenberg. Along with Rob Flowers, Matt’s older brother who is now Daniel Boone’s football coach, the three quickly formed a bond that Perez says remains unbreakable.

They and their families live a block apart in Muhlenberg. Rarely a day goes by that they don’t see each other.

“Spanky (Rob) lives two doors down from us and Tuc (Matt) lives around the corner from us,” Perez said. ” It is not by chance. Tuc and I work together (at River Rock Academy). It just happened like that.

“We will always be around each other. We were at the Tuc game the other day (in Muhlenberg). Spanky was on one side of the gym and I was on the other.

Perez, a Wilson graduate, was an assistant at Reading High for Richard Reyes and Tim Redding before being promoted to head coach for the 2011-12 season. His first hiring of staff was easy. He asked Flowers.

“You really can’t separate us,” Perez said. “If one of us does something, the other is not far away. There was no way I was going into this job without him.

Flowers had been a volunteer coach at Reading after graduating from Kutztown University, then two seasons as a JV coach at Muhlenberg before joining Perez.

Their brotherly relationship was tested in the early years, especially when Perez’s varsity team battled and defeated Flowers’ JV team. But then as now, Perez implicitly trusted Flowers, who was telling the truth regardless of the circumstances or the people he might have offended.

“He taught me that you can never push hard enough,” Perez said. “He didn’t just push the kids, he pushed us hard. It will push you to the brink. You have to trust him because you’re going to end up in a beautiful place.

Flowers first got involved in coaching when Perez and the late Brian Ellison asked him to help them with their AAU team. Since then, he doesn’t want to do anything else.

He said his task once he joined Perez with the Red Knights was to “lay the groundwork” for what the program was going to be and not rely on what it was. He was going to be more than a JV trainer.

“We were on the road a lot together,” Flowers said of him and Perez. “Our families were often together, but it was always him and me. A head coach always needs that security blanket. He could talk to me and cry on my shoulder. It’s emotional work.

“He needed me and I was there.”

Reading High, however, was not making enough progress in the eyes of many, including Perez. The Knights were 50-33 without a county or district title and finished their third season with three straight losses.

He wanted to hire an assistant with head coaching experience and had known Randall from when they coached JV, Perez at Reading and Randall at Pottstown. Randall, who had been the head coach for three unsuccessful seasons in Pottstown, brought a different personality to the Red Knights than Perez and Flowers.

“He slowed the pace for us,” Perez said. “Flowers and I are going millions of miles a minute. Jai-T was like, ‘Slow down. We’re missing things here. He really helped polish things up for us.

“I respected him so much and came to love him. He understood me and accepted me for who I am. He knew I was emotional. For Jai-T, finding his niche with us was incredible. We owe him a lot. He is our sage.

Perez and Randall faced each other several times during that first season, 2014-15, when Lonnie Walker IV was a sophomore. Randall told Perez to throw away his thick playbook and stop traveling to Philadelphia for summer games and non-league games.

“Rick told me he needed someone to check it out,” Randall recalls, “and he needed someone to see the big picture. I had no problem to do it. We bumped heads. I came up with a different goal.

“I didn’t mind taking responsibility from Rick so he could focus on a thing or two. He was so used to trying to do everything. I made the same mistakes when I was a head coach. Then he started to trust me more.

Reading High won the first of three consecutive Berks titles in Randall’s first season with the team. The following year (2015-16), the Knights captured the District 3 Class 4A title and reached the PIAA semi-finals before Allertice upset them in a match that served as motivation for the players and to coaches.

In the 2016-17 season, Walker led Reading High to a 30-3 record, the Berks title and that elusive state championship with a win over Pine-Richland in the Class 6A Finals.

“When that final buzzer went off at Giant Center, all we could do was hug each other,” Randall said. “All I could do was stay in one place and hold back my tears. We did an impossible thing. It took a lot of bumps and scars to get to this place.

Randall, an Albright College graduate, stayed on for three more seasons before taking Dieruff’s job in 2020. The Huskies went 6-9 last year and are 2-12 this season as he attempts to restore a program that has struggled for a very long time.

“He’s a big brother,” Flowers said. “He gives it to you like a pop. He gives it to you real. He is the ying of our yang. He was the calm of our storm.

Flowers left after last season when Reading won the District 3 and PIAA championships, something he had been reluctant to do. He guided Muhlenberg to an 11-5 record in his first season.

“Every decision I made came from our foxhole,” Perez said. “Every accolade that people try to give me, cut it in half and give it to Matt Flowers. He’s everything to me and what we’ve done.

The three stay in close contact and talk or text almost every day. They share memories and friendships that they will have for the rest of their lives.

“You know how when you have a child, you’re forever tied to that person?” Randall said. “It’s the same feeling. We are forever linked.

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David Marsh returns to college training https://abilitiesnetworks.org/david-marsh-returns-to-college-training/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 15:20:08 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/david-marsh-returns-to-college-training/ David Marsh travels to Berkeley to help head coach Dave Durden with Cal’s men’s collegiate team all the way to the NCAA championships. An official announcement with more details on his title and role is expected on Friday. Marsh returns to college coaching two years after stepping down as UCSD head coach in 2019. Marsh […]]]>

David Marsh travels to Berkeley to help head coach Dave Durden with Cal’s men’s collegiate team all the way to the NCAA championships. An official announcement with more details on his title and role is expected on Friday.

Marsh returns to college coaching two years after stepping down as UCSD head coach in 2019. Marsh spent two seasons in charge of the Tritons, who ended up finishing 10th (men) and 6th ( women) at the 2019 NCAA Division II Championships.

Marsh is currently the head coach of the Elite Aquatics team in San Diego, Calif., and the “Professional Advisor” to the Israel Swimming Association. Additionally, he coaches LA Current during the ISL season, which recently finished 4th at the 2021 ISL Finals.

Marsh developed Team Elite through his role at SwimMAC Carolina, a position he held for nearly a decade. As CEO and Director of Coaching for SwimMAC, he was able to develop an elite group of athletes that generated 14 Olympians for the 2008, 2012 and 2016 Games.

In 2016, Marsh was given the role of head coach of the 2016 United States Olympic Women’s Swimming. swimming in the United States in 2016 than any program in the country. If Team Elite was a country, they would have placed 4th in the medal standings in Rio. Some of the most notable athletes in this group include Ryan Lochte, Katie Meili, Kathleen Boulanger, and Anthony Ervin.

Marsh is arguably best known for his time as head coach of Auburn, where he led the Tigers from 1990 to 2007. During his tenure, Auburn amassed a team record 12 league titles. NCAA, 7 for men and 5 for women.

Notably, Durden was a former assistant under Marsh at Auburn from 2002 to 2005. Durden was on the staff of six of the Tigers’ NCAA Tag Team Championships, the men winning in 2003, 2004 and 2005, and the women winning in 2002, 2003 and 2004.

Marsh will assist Dave Durden, Chase Kreitler and volunteer assistant Matt Martinez with the men’s team. Cal is currently ranked 2nd in the CSCAA Top 25 polls and has three Olympians on its college roster: Hugo Gonzalez (Spain), Robin Hanson (Sweden), Bryce Mefford (USA) and Bjorn Seeliger (Sweden).

Kreitler and his wife are expecting the birth of their child in February, which opens the door for Marsh to become an assistant under Durden.

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How a ‘lucky chain of events’ led Da’Sean Butler to coach in the NBA G-League https://abilitiesnetworks.org/how-a-lucky-chain-of-events-led-dasean-butler-to-coach-in-the-nba-g-league/ Sun, 16 Jan 2022 06:27:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/how-a-lucky-chain-of-events-led-dasean-butler-to-coach-in-the-nba-g-league/ MORGANTOWN, WV — Da’Sean Butler is a name synonymous with West Virginia basketball, but his impact on the game transcends the Mountain State. He played a key role in the 2010 WVU Final Four. A little over a decade later, his basketball journey is still on, but just in a new title. In February 2021, […]]]>

MORGANTOWN, WV — Da’Sean Butler is a name synonymous with West Virginia basketball, but his impact on the game transcends the Mountain State.

He played a key role in the 2010 WVU Final Four. A little over a decade later, his basketball journey is still on, but just in a new title.

In February 2021, Butler joined Wheeling University’s coaching staff. In October, he made the jump from Division II to the NBA G-League where he is currently an assistant with the College Park Skyhawks.

“It’s going really, really well to tell you the truth. It was just a great learning experience for me personally. There are days when I realize how much I don’t know what I’m doing, then there are days when I realize I know a little about basketball,” Butler said. “Just those good and bad days, mixing them up and getting better in between.”

Butler describes his journey to coaching as “the luckiest chain of events.” Wheeling head coach Chris Richardson is someone he’s known since he was 18. They fell out of touch for about eight years as Butler continued his professional career overseas. Once back in the United States, he realized that Richardson had become a coach. They reconnected and Butler was invited to Wheeling to speak to Richardson’s team. The rest is history.

“He brought me out there to talk to the players about what it takes to be a pro and things of that nature. I talked to the guys and it was a good conversation,” Butler said. Afterwards, all these loving people helped me and I got the chance to work at Wheeling, which was phenomenal.”

Mountaineer basketball legend and current G-League assistant coach Da’Sean Butler is our guest at the premiere of the Gold and Blue Nation podcast. Butler, who is currently benched for the College Park Skyhawks, joins Nick Farrell and Anjelica Trinone to discuss his coaching journey, coaching style, former mountaineers to pros and coaching legacy by Bob Huggins. Subscribe to the free Gold and Blue Nation podcast for more episodes, including exclusive interviews and post-game reaction from the Gold and Blue Nation team. For more WVU sports coverage, download the free Gold and Blue Nation app on your favorite Apple or Android device, and follow Gold and Blue Nation on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

The same kind of relationships that brought the former mountaineer to the Cardinals coaching staff are the same that took him to the next level.

“I used those relationships that I made solely through basketball to get into the NBA assistant coach program. I joined that program while I was in Wheeling as a coach. assistant and I was trying to get my master’s degree. I faced all three at the same time,” Butler said. “Class went well. I graduated from both WVU and the assistant coach program. Then I was invited to work in two separate (NBA) summer leagues, one in Las Vegas and one in Salt Lake City, and I was a guest coach and was able to help both organizations. I was able to meet a bunch of people throughout the summer, it was a whirlwind, it went really fast and I ended up being given this opportunity.

However, those same relationships made it a bittersweet opportunity.

“It sucked at the same time because I had to leave these guys that I had formed such a good relationship with in a short time,” Butler added.

He is still in contact with his former WU players and coaching staff. Butler said he stayed in all group chats and offered advice on anything he could – both basketball and life related. He wants to help the next generation achieve their goals by sharing their experiences. It was precisely for this reason that he became a coach.

“I always knew I wanted to coach. My dad kind of coached me when I was younger. I was lucky enough to go with him to a ton of training camps and clinics and played basketball myself. The chance to see his relationships with those players – I was an only child, so the guys he mentored and helped were kind of like brothers to me,” Butler said. “Just seeing this piqued my interest in coaching. From then on, going to these clinics and meeting these great coaches, I was hooked on the idea. I was just in love with the basketball as a whole.

And basketball made that love reciprocal. After playing at Morgantown from 2007 to 2010, Butler was drafted by the Miami Heat and played as a professional until 2020. He learned from a number of influential coaches along the way, including his father. and Bob Huggins. They helped shape him as a player. Now they inspire him as a coach.

“If I could take anything away from these guys, it’s more or less be myself,” Butler said. “They didn’t try to be what they weren’t and they were very transparent and honest. They have always maintained an open and honest dialogue with their players. That’s why their players respect them and they are loved. They don’t pretend to be something in front of the state and their team, then someone completely different away from the lights.

As College Park coach, Butler’s relationships came into play once again in December. Former Mountaineer guard Deuce McBride and the Westchester Knicks faced the Skyhawks for back-to-back games.

When Butler was back in Morgantown during the summers, he and McBride crossed paths at their respective workouts. Now they met as opponents.

Butler said he took the opportunity to get McBride’s perspective on the G-League and what he can expect. That afternoon, he learned a lot from Deuce, and unfortunately, it was at his expense.

“After selfishly choosing his brain for about 5-10 minutes, we kinda joked around. Then I told him to calm us down. He didn’t,” Butler said. the first time we faced him. Surprise.”

The Mountaineer legend and the Skyhawks are back on Sunday against Motor City. You can hear this exclusive interview with Butler in its entirety on the first episode of The Gold and Blue Nation podcast.

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Is Chiefs OC Eric Bieniemy a good fit for NFL coaching searches? https://abilitiesnetworks.org/is-chiefs-oc-eric-bieniemy-a-good-fit-for-nfl-coaching-searches/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 03:20:01 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/is-chiefs-oc-eric-bieniemy-a-good-fit-for-nfl-coaching-searches/ Chiefs offensive coordinator Eric Bieniemy tuned into a virtual press conference Thursday to talk about the Pittsburgh Steelers. Except, no matter how hard he tried, he couldn’t expect him to talk much about the Pittsburgh Steelers. It is mid-January, after all; eight NFL teams (a quarter of the league) need a head coach; and Bieniemy […]]]>

Chiefs offensive coordinator Eric Bieniemy tuned into a virtual press conference Thursday to talk about the Pittsburgh Steelers. Except, no matter how hard he tried, he couldn’t expect him to talk much about the Pittsburgh Steelers.

It is mid-January, after all; eight NFL teams (a quarter of the league) need a head coach; and Bieniemy figures to be in the mix for some of them.

Again.

And so, naturally, the conversation shifted pretty quickly. Bieniemy played along, at least initially, with a line he often uses at this time of year: It’s only fair to be mentioned.

But it was not enough. So, nearly 10 minutes later, as questions about the possibility of him leading an NFL staff continued, he felt compelled to point something out.

“Don’t you know we’re playing the Pittsburgh Steelers this weekend?” He asked. “What are we talking about, guys? Are we talking about football or are we talking about interviews?

There was a hint of intentional amusement in that response. But it’s important to note that this conversation is not happening because of the media. It also doesn’t happen because of Eric Bieniemy.

It’s here because the NFL has collectively continued to make one. The NFL has only one black head coach since Thursday afternoon, and that’s the guy coming to Kansas City for a playoff game this weekend. As the league continues to promote diversity and inclusion with public marketing campaigns — and even incentives to hire minorities — its franchises have moved in the opposite direction for their locker room management.

The Texans fired David Culley, a former Chiefs assistant, on Thursday after just a year on the job – the only one-year coach in Houston history – after asking him to win football games with Davis Mills, and no Deshaun Watson, as his quarterback. It comes days after the Dolphins fired Brian Flores in a move that shocked even those in connected NFL circles. It will be said that there was more to these situations – there is always more – but for now, that leaves an alarming statistic.

A black head coach. In a league that employs 70% black players.

Steelers coach Mike Tomlin arrives in Kansas City on Sunday for his 10th playoff appearance in 15 seasons at Pittsburgh, a remarkable streak that includes zero losing seasons. His resume stands out, and now it stands on its own.

The conversation can end when it is no longer accurate. Ditto for the annual song-and-dance with Bieniemy. He didn’t ask to be the poster child for this storyline, but here he is seated nonetheless. The first half of this sentence is made up of his own words from last year, and the second half is reality.

He is the offensive coordinator for a team that has won back-to-back Super Bowls; he has been coaching football for two decades now; and he received public, sometimes even spontaneous, support from people like Andy Reid and Patrick Mahomes.

Bieniemy has interviewed nearly half of the league’s teams over the past three years, and he’ll have another interview with the Denver Broncos next week to discuss their coaching job.

14 of the 32 teams have invited Bieniemy to present his plan for the future. And you can’t help but wonder if that’s now part of what works against him, if a team determines, Yes, we love it, but what are we missing? What hasn’t everyone seen?

Bieniemy doesn’t decide Kansas City play-calls, at least not regularly, a role Reid reserves for himself. But he was passed over for others who didn’t call plays either…and others who hadn’t even coached an NFL football game.

All of that, insists Bieniemy, is far from his mind as the Chiefs prepare to face the Steelers in the AFC Wild Card round on Sunday. He cannot interview for other jobs until this round is over. Thus, the Steelers collect all his attention.

But he thought about being a head coach for a while — long before he came to Kansas City. In fact, in 2006, while serving as a post coach for the Vikings, his first NFL coaching job, Bieniemy watched another man prepare to take that step. This guy was finally hired, and he did pretty well.

Mike Tomlin.

“I saw him do his interview, and it was very, very impressive,” Bieniemy said. “I’ve always known after watching him go through that experience and seeing him become the great coach he’s become (that) it’s been very motivating for me. I’ve been collecting my items for my book for several years now You just keep adding more and building it.

It was 2006. Bieniemy was only 37 years old, the possibilities ahead of him. Now he’s a Super Bowl champion and a member of a team led by Andy Reid for nine years, the last four as offensive coordinator.

This may be the year a team tries their luck with him.

Or maybe we’ll have this conversation again next year.

“Right now, my goal is to make sure it’s not a distraction in whatever we want to accomplish,” Bieniemy said. “Because the only thing that matters is that our guys are mentally and physically ready to go out and play the best they can on Sunday. And the rest of the other stuff will take care of that on its own.

This story was originally published January 14, 2022 5:00 a.m.

Kansas City Star Related Stories

Sam McDowell covers the Chiefs and the sports business for The Star.

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