elementary school – Abilities Networks http://abilitiesnetworks.org/ Sat, 16 Apr 2022 23:23:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-4.png elementary school – Abilities Networks http://abilitiesnetworks.org/ 32 32 Henman’s coaching is a real hit at Chestnut Park Primary https://abilitiesnetworks.org/henmans-coaching-is-a-real-hit-at-chestnut-park-primary/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 11:35:32 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/henmans-coaching-is-a-real-hit-at-chestnut-park-primary/ Tim Henman, the former UK tennis number 1, visited Chestnut Park Primary School in West Croydon this morning as part of an attendance initiative organized by the Lawn Tennis Association and funded by the former’s charity foundation player. Expert Advice: young Chestnut Grove student gets advice on his forehand from Tim Henman LTA Youth is […]]]>

Tim Henman, the former UK tennis number 1, visited Chestnut Park Primary School in West Croydon this morning as part of an attendance initiative organized by the Lawn Tennis Association and funded by the former’s charity foundation player.

Expert Advice: young Chestnut Grove student gets advice on his forehand from Tim Henman

LTA Youth is an innovative junior program for children aged 4-18, created to help more children experience the benefits of playing and staying in tennis, regardless of age, gender, ability, disability or their origin.

Chestnut Park Primary School is located in one of the most deprived areas in the country. Last year, the school was encouraged by the Tim Henman Foundation and their academic trust, GLF Schools, to adopt the LTA offer of free online teacher training through the LTA Youth Schools program.

The school completed the primary teacher training course and received a £250 voucher, an incentive to take the training, which they chose to use for 10 hours of team teaching with an LTA accredited coach local.

Following this, and to help students continue their tennis journey beyond their PE sessions, the Tim Henman Foundation funded the school’s 592 students to participate in an LTA Youth Start course. , developed as the perfect introductory course for young children who are new to tennis.

LTA Youth Start is delivered by coaches at tennis clubs, parks and other locations across the country, and includes six progressive, fun sessions with a trained LTA Youth Start coach, plus a free tennis racquet, a set of balls and a branded t-shirt for each child.

Today’s event was the third of six LTA Youth Start training sessions that will be delivered to students by coaches through April.

“Sports opportunities in areas that need them the most are what we seek,” Henman said today after leading a Chestnut Park student training session.

Game, set and match : nearly 300 West Croydon primary school pupils benefited from tennis coaching as part of the Henman-supported LTA program

Luke Digweed of the LTA said: “The LTA Youth Schools program is a great opportunity to get students playing and learning through tennis and it’s fantastic that the primary school teachers in Chestnut Park have completed training to open tennis to its students. .

“It’s fantastic that the Tim Henman Foundation has been able to provide Chestnut Park Elementary School with additional funding for students to continue their introduction to tennis through the LTA Youth Start program, and it was great to have Tim to school for this semester.”

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About insidecroydon

News, views and analysis about the people of Croydon, their lives and their political times in London’s diverse and most populous borough. Based in Croydon and edited by Steven Downes. To contact us, please email inside.croydon@btinternet.com

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Teaching skills, helping others | News, Sports, Jobs https://abilitiesnetworks.org/teaching-skills-helping-others-news-sports-jobs/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 07:33:11 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/teaching-skills-helping-others-news-sports-jobs/ Photo submitted Darren Groninger instructs a group of children during the first week of Camp JACK at Hoeven Elementary School in Minot on Saturday. Sixty young boys and girls hone their basketball skills while helping raise funds for the Dakota Hope Clinic at an annual camp initiated nine years ago by a sophomore. Sophomore Joshua […]]]>

Photo submitted Darren Groninger instructs a group of children during the first week of Camp JACK at Hoeven Elementary School in Minot on Saturday.

Sixty young boys and girls hone their basketball skills while helping raise funds for the Dakota Hope Clinic at an annual camp initiated nine years ago by a sophomore.

Sophomore Joshua Groninger, now a sophomore at South Prairie School, continues to lead Camp JACK (Joshua’s Athletic Camp for Kids) for children ages 3-6 with the help of family and friends. friends. The eighth annual camp, which was suspended last year due to COVID-19, is being held every Saturday morning this month, with all proceeds going to Dakota Hope, a pregnancy support center serving the Minot region.

When Joshua first approached his father, Darren, about starting a basketball camp, his mother, Melodee, suggested that all proceeds be donated to a good cause, according to a press release. relating the history of the camp.

“Since the Dakota Hope Clinic began, our church, Living Word Lutheran, has encouraged members to donate and volunteer,” Darren Groninger said in the release. “We heard about Dakota Hope being a great organization and what it does for our community. I guess our sophomore understood this because when we asked where the money should go, he chose Dakota Hope.

Darren Groninger estimated that this year’s camp will provide Dakota Hope with $6,200 when matched with Giving Hearts Day funds. Giving Hearts Day is a 24-hour fundraising event for charities in North Dakota and Northwestern Minnesota. Donations can be made to one of the many charities in Minot and North Dakota on GivingHeartsDay.org on February 10. other performance and accountability standards.

Photo submitted Joshua Groninger leads a Camp JACK lesson on Saturday.

Groninger said Camp JACK has donated through Giving Hearts Day for the past four years, raising about $36,000 in camp proceeds and matching funds since its inception. He said corporate sponsors help the camp offset expenses, but the generosity of the community went beyond that to help with fundraising. A company, which asked for $200, gave $1,000. Parents of campers are asked to donate $25 per child, and one donated $250.

Volunteers are also essential to the camp’s ability to raise funds.

“Joshua had the original idea to do the camp and he has always been an active instructor in the camp, but due to his involvement in high school activities and now high school basketball, the camp could not be finished without the help of his family and friends,” says Darren Groninger.

In particular, members of Joshua’s traveling basketball team, grades three through eight, chose to share their love of basketball and use their gifts in service to others through Camp JACK, did he declare.

“I’m proud of Joshua, but we couldn’t have done this without the support of his traveling basketball teammates and their parents,” says Groningen.


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Chabad directors to meet at training retreats https://abilitiesnetworks.org/chabad-directors-to-meet-at-training-retreats/ Sun, 30 Jan 2022 14:58:27 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/chabad-directors-to-meet-at-training-retreats/ Two school leadership training retreats — one for Menahelim and another for Menahelos — will be held in February in Atlanta and Florida, hosted by the Menachem Education Foundation (MEF). Full story What does it take to run a successful school in today’s educational climate where student needs are constantly changing? While this issue is […]]]>

Two school leadership training retreats — one for Menahelim and another for Menahelos — will be held in February in Atlanta and Florida, hosted by the Menachem Education Foundation (MEF). Full story

What does it take to run a successful school in today’s educational climate where student needs are constantly changing?

While this issue is front and center for so many parents, teachers and leaders, the Menachem Education Foundation (MEF) took the opportunity to organize two school leadership training retreats – one for Menahelim and another for Menahelos – both scheduled to take place this February.

The Menahelei Mosdos Chinuch Training Retreat, designed to train Chabad school leaders of Chedarim and Yeshivos to conduct the Chinuch in their moisad, will take place Monday-Tuesday February 7-8/ו-ז אדרא. The workshops will take place at the Chaya Mushka Children’s House, a thriving Chabad elementary school in Atlanta, Georgia. This will be the first of a four-part series, with future retreats taking place in Iyar 5782, summer 5782 and early 5783.

The program will be moderated by Rabbi Mendy GreenbaumPrincipal of the School of Cheder Menachem and Bais Chaya Mushka in Los Angeles, California, and Rabbi Mendy Levin, Principal at Cheder Chabad Philadelphia. Workshops will focus on how to solve problems, analyze data from the school environment, and practice protocols to develop leadership and communication skills.

This program is the 10th cohort of MEF’s leadership training for Menahelim. More than a dozen Menahelim have registered, adding to the 102 former graduates. Rabbi Levi Kaplan, Menahel of Cheder Chabad of Monsey, shares that training as a principal through the Menachem Education Foundation has “transformed my job, empowered me to learn, and given me the edge I need to to be Matzliach in my Shlichus of Chinuch”. Interested Menahalim can still register at mymef.org/mmc.

For women leading Chabad schools, the MEF is creating a retreat with a different focus, addressing their most current needs. The program, which runs February 20-21 / י “ט-כ אדר א, features the theme “Reaching Their Hearts and Minds – Empowering Yourself as an Educational Leader to Build a School That Can Reach the Whole of Child.” Workshops will be hosted by Chabad of Coral Springs, with school visits to the Lubavitch Hebrew Academy and nearby Rohr Bais Chaya.

The MEF has organized many mental health awareness programs for Mechanchos and Menahelos, and the School Leaders Retreat will showcase the enhanced tracks, especially for school leaders.

Featured presentations will be the heart of CHINUCH – social-emotional learning for school leaders with Ms. Henny Bartfieldand crisis intervention in Chabad schools with Mrs. Dena GorkinCPP of the Bnos Chomesh Academy, and Mrs. Francois Gitty LCSW of Houston, TX. The retreat will also include collaborative and inspiring programs. Menahalos can register at www.mymef.org/leadershipretreat.

“The Chabad Chinuch community is extremely vibrant, with so many talented, new and experienced school leaders,” shares MEF Founder and Executive Director Rabbi Zalman Shneur. “We are honored to have the opportunity to bring together the best in our community to learn from each other’s best practices in order to provide a top-notch Chinuch for today’s students. We are privileged to facilitate networking and collaboration among those who lead the most sacred Shlichus of Chinuch.

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MLK Day Where Race Teaching Bills Stand in Wisconsin | News https://abilitiesnetworks.org/mlk-day-where-race-teaching-bills-stand-in-wisconsin-news/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 00:26:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/mlk-day-where-race-teaching-bills-stand-in-wisconsin-news/ Where are the Breed Teaching Bills in Wisconsin? MADISON (WKOW) — A bill that would establish new restrictions on how Wisconsin K-12 schools can teach race relations remains a vote away from Gov. Tony Evers’ office. The topic of how schools teach about race, and specifically whether they incorporate elements of critical race theory, came […]]]>

Where are the Breed Teaching Bills in Wisconsin?



MADISON (WKOW) — A bill that would establish new restrictions on how Wisconsin K-12 schools can teach race relations remains a vote away from Gov. Tony Evers’ office.

The topic of how schools teach about race, and specifically whether they incorporate elements of critical race theory, came to the fore again during Martin Luther King Jr. Day Monday.

Former Gov. Scott Walker addressed Critical Race Theory (CRT), which is a subject for law students only.

Opposing the CRT doesn’t mean we don’t want students learning about slavery or racial tensions throughout America’s history,” Walker wrote. “Instead, we want students to learn how we’ve worked to overcome it and what remains to be done. , rather than engaging in a new form of racism.”

Frank King, a professor of ethnic studies at UW-Platteville, pushed back against the former governor’s words, saying there was nothing racist about exploring how the country’s history of discriminatory policies on issues as housing and banking affects the present.

“[CRT] is an analysis of the law through the lens of race,” King said.

Dan Lennington, associate attorney at the conservative Wisconsin Institute for Law & Liberty, said while the CRT itself may not be taught at the elementary school level, he believes districts are putting its principles into practice. .

“Teaching kids about white privilege, whiteness, implicit bias, microaggressions, saying all cops are bad, lessons about social activism,” Lennington said. “These are very different teaching categories.”

Lennington specifically pointed to the Middleton Cross Plains area school district and his page for “Anti-Racist Learning Resources,” which includes subpages on topics like implicit bias and whiteness.

King said such lessons were key to understanding the present, pointing to the breed creation as a concept dates back to the 1600s and was used to divide workers.

“Poor white people are affected by this because they have always been taught to have animosity towards the people below them instead of the people who have all the wealth,” King said.

Status of legislation

Assembly Republicans passed a bill in September, it would prohibit school districts from teaching lessons that make students feel responsible for acts committed by ancestors of the same race or gender.

Lennington defended the legislation, saying it was not intended to block the teaching of unpleasant moments in American history. He said schools in Wisconsin could teach the impact of the history of racist policies on the present without dividing students into classes of oppressor and oppressed.

“How we overcame racism in many examples in the past, how racism still has an effect and persists in today’s society, how there are racial disparities in American society,” he said. declared. “These things are all true, all must be taught.”

Rep. LaKeshia Myers (D-Milwaukee) said the bills would have a chilling effect on those lessons, though, because parents would only have to say their child felt responsible for historical injustices. She said that in reality the bill is an example of a concerted conservative effort to use the lessons of race as a corner issue.

“They made Critical Race Theory kind of a ‘big bad wolf’ and kind of a national catch-all phrase,” she said.

The bill still needs to receive a vote in the Senate. The office of Senate Majority Leader Devin LeMahieu (R-Oostburg) did not respond to questions Monday about the status of the bill.

Myers said the bill’s existence in tandem with GOP lawmakers sharing some of King’s writings was particularly hard to digest on Monday. Frank King and the Milwaukee Democrat both accused conservatives of whitewashing King’s legacy, pointing to some of his other writings that argued the United States had failed to extend its promise of prosperity and opportunity to all.

“[King], you know, wanted Black and White to walk hand in hand,” Myers said.

]]> Learning Curve: Schools’ plan to teach refugee students goes beyond the classroom | News https://abilitiesnetworks.org/learning-curve-schools-plan-to-teach-refugee-students-goes-beyond-the-classroom-news/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 06:15:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/learning-curve-schools-plan-to-teach-refugee-students-goes-beyond-the-classroom-news/ Since the start of this school year, around 115 refugee students have enrolled in public schools in the Daviess County area. Of these students, 40 attend Owensboro Public Schools and 75 attend Daviess County Public Schools. The education of these students requires collaboration and communication between several entities, and it all starts with building relationships […]]]>

Since the start of this school year, around 115 refugee students have enrolled in public schools in the Daviess County area.

Of these students, 40 attend Owensboro Public Schools and 75 attend Daviess County Public Schools. The education of these students requires collaboration and communication between several entities, and it all starts with building relationships and trust, for example in English.

“What’s important to address is why students are refugees,” said Jana Beth Francis, assistant superintendent of teaching and learning at DCPS, who is also the EL coordinator for the district. “By nature, the name refugee means that you must have undergone some sort of trauma and had to leave your home. “

School systems work with refugee students and their families to make sure they feel safe and welcome above all else. They help build communities among these populations and introduce these families to the community, Francis said.

Another variable is that educators often don’t know how long these students were in a traumatized environment, or how long these students were in school, Francis said.

Ashlie Hurley, the EL coordinator for OPS, said that a student’s mother once told her that she had spent 21 years in a refugee camp before coming to the area.

“Many refugees have different levels of English proficiency,” Hurley said. “Some have little or no experience of English and others speak six languages. It varies from family to family.

When needed, both school systems use an interpreter service, which Hurley says is a saving grace, as well as EL teachers who work tirelessly with students and families.

Educating all students is always the job and goal of teachers and those affiliated with school systems, but when it comes to students who have experienced trauma, such as some refugees, academics often do not come first. Hurley said.

EL coordinators and educators make home visits, show them the community, the school their child will attend, how bus transport works, she said.

“I think the best approach at the start is to just build these relationships and the basic understanding that they are safe, that they are going to be nurtured, cared for, that we can be trusted,” she said. declared.

When the time comes to introduce these students to the classroom, they work closely with the EL teachers, who coordinate with the classroom teachers. Often, refugee students are subject to a screening assessment so that educators can get a feel for their level of English proficiency. They are also reviewed regularly throughout the school year to see how they are progressing.

Many other information gatherings also take place, such as discussions with the student and their family about where they grew up, their level of education and any other needs of the student. Educators are also researching what school looked like in students’ countries of origin, Francis said.

One thing that’s interesting about most English learners and refugee students, Francis said, is that they generally excel at math, and that’s usually a marker for whether or not a student has a grade. of schooling.

Hurley agreed and said math can be kind of a universal language for students.

At the middle and secondary levels, both school systems have newcomer programs for refugee and EL students. This class teaches them basic English and other necessities that can help them navigate school life.

While EL and refugee students receive one-to-one tuition and targeted interventions, especially at the elementary school level, Hurley and Francis agreed that the best approach for EL and refugee students is to integrate them into classroom life. ordinary, if possible.

Typically, said Hurley, a student performs better by mid-year after being in a classroom for an extended period of time with his native English-speaking peers.

An important thing to also keep in mind is that these students are usually not graded in a traditional sense, Hurley said.

“We keep an eye on them and test them like other students, but what we’re really monitoring is growth and making sure all of the child’s needs are met,” she said.

Francis said that a learner of English can take five to seven years to master the language, and having a traumatic past can make learning the language even more difficult.

“The important thing is to make sure that they feel safe and that they are in a learning environment where they trust adults, and then we work on Academic English and develop the necessary skills from there. there, “she said.

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Grand Area Mentoring Awarded Seed Grant to Moonflower Seeds | Go out and go https://abilitiesnetworks.org/grand-area-mentoring-awarded-seed-grant-to-moonflower-seeds-go-out-and-go/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 00:34:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/grand-area-mentoring-awarded-seed-grant-to-moonflower-seeds-go-out-and-go/ [ad_1] Some of the most powerful bonding experiences that Daniel McNeil, Grand Area Mentoring Program Director, has had with his childhood mentors have been over meals. There is something about eating together that brings people together, he says. When McNeil applied for the Seeds to Start grant through the Moonflower Community Co-op, on behalf of […]]]>


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Some of the most powerful bonding experiences that Daniel McNeil, Grand Area Mentoring Program Director, has had with his childhood mentors have been over meals. There is something about eating together that brings people together, he says.

When McNeil applied for the Seeds to Start grant through the Moonflower Community Co-op, on behalf of Grand Area Mentoring, he had these moments in mind: His proposed use of the grant money would be to provide mentors and mentees. vouchers for Moonflower, so the pairs could learn, buy and enjoy snacks together.

Grand Area Mentoring received the grant in December. The mentoring program began in 2005, pairing adult volunteers with children seeking guidance. Mentors and mentees meet for one hour a week and form friendships. 22 currently paired mentors / mentees will benefit from the Moonflower grant, McNeil said.

“I think it will give [mentees] a new opportunity to shop in a place where they might never have been before, ”said McNeil. “They are going to experience something new, their horizons are going to broaden and they are going to have a bonding experience with their mentors.”

When the program started it was based in the Grand County School District – mentors met their mentees there. But a few years ago, McNeil developed a new program: Once mentees have formed a friendship with their mentor and reached middle school, they can meet their mentors outside of school.

The purpose of the Moonflower Seeds to Start grant is to provide financial assistance to any local nonprofit or individual who will “cultivate holistic community well-being,” which can be interpreted in a variety of ways, said Maggie Keating, coordinator of Marketing and Outreach at Moonflower. .

“The mentor and mentees can use the grant as an experience to learn about so many different things in the co-op,” she said. “From local food and local farms to the environmental impact of our globalized food system, and why we try to focus so much on sourcing our food locally and fairly and sustainably. “

She and three other co-op employees were part of the grants committee this year and ultimately chose Grand Area Mentoring because they were inspired by the idea that the grant could be used to directly educate community members who don’t. might not have this opportunity otherwise.

Grand Area Mentoring is always looking to increase its number of adult mentors, McNeil said. Currently, the program has over 20 children on the waiting list. In 2020, the program had to take a hiatus due to complications with the COVID-19 pandemic. But towards the end of last year, the program started to grow slowly again: a new cohort of mentors started in September, and another cohort will start at the end of January 2022.

Adult volunteers go through a major screening and training process before they are matched, and it works: The national average for the mentor-mentee program relationships is around six months, McNeil said, but the Grand Area mentors Mentoring typically work with their mentees for at least three months. year.

“Many mentors find this volunteer opportunity extremely rewarding,” said McNeil. “There is a real need for more mentors. We would like to match some of these kids eager to have a mentor and eager to be guided with the kind and responsible adults we know in Moab.

Mentees run from Grades 1 to 12, with most new matches being done at the elementary school level – the perfect time for a child to enter the program is between Grades 2 and 5, said McNeil.

Any adult interested in volunteering can upload an application on the Grand Area Mentoring website (www.grandmentoring.org). The next mentor orientation will take place on Thursday, January 27.

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my crazy descent when I started coaching my son’s team. https://abilitiesnetworks.org/my-crazy-descent-when-i-started-coaching-my-sons-team/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 10:49:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/my-crazy-descent-when-i-started-coaching-my-sons-team/ [ad_1] At night I went through the team management manifesto of a Dutch football coaching legend from the 70s and studied the Brazilian training manuals from the 90s for the best possible lineups for five-a-side football. . I weighed the virtues of a dedicated sweeper and four attacking players who could operate freely against the […]]]>


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At night I went through the team management manifesto of a Dutch football coaching legend from the 70s and studied the Brazilian training manuals from the 90s for the best possible lineups for five-a-side football. . I weighed the virtues of a dedicated sweeper and four attacking players who could operate freely against the safety of two players who remained in defense. The eight kids who showed up regularly for training all ran hard and tried to target their kicks. We had options.

I wasn’t devising tactics for a greenhouse travel league team or a particularly zealous ale league with former college players battling body decline in their thirties. The team in question was that of my 5 year old son, and the games were part of a Dallas YMCA sponsored mixed soccer league at his school.

The set-up was wonderfully inexpensive: an on-campus practice continued on Friday afternoon and Saturday games in a sun-bleached tundra next to a large college in North Texas.

Some of our players didn’t notice when our team scored, or when we conceded a goal.

I quickly learned that our players could be worried about how to put on a fluorescent yellow bib. Good clean tackles made us cry. Some of our players didn’t notice when our team scored or when we conceded a goal. It was bird migration season, so reporting a large crowd of blackbirds perched in the trees was sometimes more interesting than kicking the ball.

My 5 year old always went to play football. Her mother is an excellent footballer; I was a deeply mediocre player but I remain an obsessive. My son’s nanny is a strong supporter of Tigres UANL in Mexico and has dressed my two children in full Tigers kits. My son turned 2 in the summer of 2018, and he and I woke up together to the first World Cup games in the kitchen. I have valuable videos of my son while in diapers, standing and clapping for various national anthems.

For the first workouts my role was exclusively as a daddy: I ​​picked up my son from school, performed the snack and the outfit change, showed him how to roll his beloved high socks on his shin guards (he prefers to train in European uniform; Celta Vigo in baby blue and Arsenal in red are his favorites), took him to the pitch, told him I loved him and stood ready with water. Sometimes I would pass the ball with my son and all the other kids there before falling back on the sidelines to brew the water and the praise.

Then our head coach had a conflict a week. We had an assistant coach who collapsed and seemed determined to teach kids the worst and least fun ways to play: a crowd attack around the ball paired ferrets with a disease defense that produced nothing but scrums. small hesitant kicks and dust.

So I intervened. The practice was easy. I brought extra balls. I had cones and downloaded a few U-6 drills and I remembered what I could of my own time indiscriminately in the New England AYSO leagues. When the coach was late I would help the team warm up and do exercises until he showed up.

Soon I co-coached the team, designed workouts, laid out the cones, and helped a 5-year-old turn her foot to use her instep to pass the ball, then rushed to 15 feet to help a child receive this pass. My son was delighted. He called me “Coach Dad” and laughed to himself.

Anyone who has worked with young children knows how pure it can be – children laugh. They shout their friend’s name as they pass the ball to them. You announce a water break and they run over to the sideline where someone who loves them has a water bottle ready for them.

The games were different. The litter was the appropriate Texas size. Our league had public, private, and parochial school teams: from a public elementary school off the National Highway to a sprawling, lucre-laden day school where the Dallas Cowboys owner named a field after him. and his wife. The attendance at the matches was high. Extended families have appeared. Older siblings and cousins ​​in their own uniforms for their own sports watched their younger siblings tackle a soccer ball before the family went to their own games.

The intensity of sports for young people in Texas requires no introduction. The stadiums of high schools that can accommodate 10,000 are commonplace. The strongest and most comprehensive piece of infrastructure in the state of Texas is the organization in charge of primary and secondary school competitions, from referees to rankings through championships in all areas, from fanfare to football through one-act plays and meat inspection. Even high school and junior college football programs boast myths about Texas and being young and lost regional legends. There was a popular TV show that dealt with these things. You may have heard of it.

Perhaps the best example I have has his: My son was a really big baby when we first moved to Dallas. Once, as I was walking him in his stroller through the Dallas Farmers Market, a stranger walked past us, smiled, touched my son’s big chubby knee and said “linebacker!” To me as a blessing.

So while football in Texas is not good football – and even though I imagine myself being separated from the patriarchal, cheeky, and patriarchal families of volunteer coaches – I have joined the same vast biome. And it did something to me. My eternally bookish penchants for football, my own failures as a young player, my vast experiences in teaching, the decades of witnessing and studying the sport I desperately wanted to be good at but never would – n weren’t these the seeds of a future coach?

In our league, the coaches stood on the pitch like a conductor. Our job was ostensibly to encourage the reluctant, to remind the selfish to share – every youth football team will have a ball hog determined to dribble aimlessly and confidently until the end of the days – and to make sure that everything the world backs down when the other team has a goal kick. But inevitably, as you offer encouragement and reminders (on corners: “Apply it from the corner flag to the goal! You get it! Take your time!”) To your own team, you interact with them. other parent trainers on the estate. You chat during half-time. The vibes can be weird: more than once I have received gibberish from a guy with a Rolex Daytona about how the two groups of kids “have to be more aggressive” in a sleepy late game. afternoon for 4-year-olds. It struck me: I was also there to manage these guys.

Our team won their first matches convincingly. My son and another teammate with football experience both plowed the midfield, scooped the ball, passed everyone and kicked the ball into the net. Parents were applauding and children screaming: all that mattered was that they scored.

I started wearing a Tilly hat with a curled up side like the gamekeeper in jurassic park.

Watching my son’s team play up close, I felt a tension: I wanted them to have fun first. And yes, I wanted them to win. But I wanted them to learn, to try new things. Parents are working hard to make these practices and children are brave to be here: let’s make sense of these practices. Allow me to deploy my literary knowledge about football. I was determined that the children would try to pass to each other and learn when to fall back into defensive positions. I started to mix the Brazilian five-a-side games I talked about with simple chaotic classics like having kids shoot the ball at me while I was running and selling like Ric Flair when I got hit. As Dutch training genius Rinus Michels wrote, “every training session is a form of communication”.

I felt special pride when our team beat and surpassed teams coached by adults, violating what I considered fair play: teams made up of all boys; teams that left their best players for the entire game and hid their shyest, smallest and less experienced players on the bench. My loathing for some of the other parent-coaches turned into action. I taught our team how to lead the rock-solid defense and Inter Milan’s curled counterattack from José Mourinho against better teams – and they did. I had everyone switch positions in total Ajax football style against weaker teams and they loved it. We started to receive compliments from the opposing coaches and parents of the team. I ordered more Brazilian training manuals. We devoured donut holes at halftime. I started wearing a Tilly hat with a curled up side like the gamekeeper in jurassic park (each coach needs a signature). A stranger put her hands on my shoulders and congratulated me on having a “real football stallion” for a son. Once, after we rubbed a team, the opposing coach – visor, golf shirt, dress shorts – shook his head in awe at the final whistle and congratulated me and my co-coach on our success as if we were a bunch of old hammy veteran SEC coaches. I couldn’t deny the pride I felt. These were games where some players still needed diapers at night.

Now that the season is over, I think I’ve learned something. Youth coaching, when done well, is the chance to create a space where a child can change. Whatever my own path to coaching, I – the coach, the guide, the adult with their own personal stories and motivations – shouldn’t matter too much. They are, as they say, children. In the last game of the season, the shyest and most selfless player on our team decided to rush into midfield, win the ball and dribble towards goal. I gasped and clapped as if Garrincha’s spirit had materialized on that patch of scrub grass in Texas. She missed her shot on goal, but when she turned around she was smiling and her mother, grandmother and the rest of us were cheering her like true believers.

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Calfee Training School Added to Virginia Historic Landmark (Copy) | Local news https://abilitiesnetworks.org/calfee-training-school-added-to-virginia-historic-landmark-copy-local-news/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/calfee-training-school-added-to-virginia-historic-landmark-copy-local-news/ [ad_1] Robert Freis The Roanoke Times The Calfee Training School, a 20th century building associated with the African American history of Pulaski County, has been added to the prestigious Virginia Historic Landmarks Register. The State Department of Historic Resources announced Thursday that the educational site has been added to the registry, a list of places […]]]>


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Robert Freis The Roanoke Times

The Calfee Training School, a 20th century building associated with the African American history of Pulaski County, has been added to the prestigious Virginia Historic Landmarks Register.

The State Department of Historic Resources announced Thursday that the educational site has been added to the registry, a list of places of historical, architectural, archaeological and cultural significance.

According to the VDH, the training school building on Corbin-Harmon Drive in Pulaski dates from 1939, when it was built with federal funding from the Public Works Administration.

The separate elementary school catered for African American children.

It closed in 1966 when Pulaski County desegregated its public school system and reopened in 1968 as a Pulaski Integrated Elementary School for kindergarten students. It closed permanently in 2010.

A planned African American history, education and community center at the site will receive $ 160,000 from a state fund that was previously used for land conservation.

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The Virginia Outdoors Foundation announced in 2020 that Calfee Training School and TG Howard Community Center have received grants from its Open Space Lands Preservation Trust Fund.

After laws governing the Preservation Trust Fund were amended earlier this year by the General Assembly, the foundation’s board of directors adopted the broader mission of supporting community outdoor recreation and education. .

The downtown Pulaski school and community center have each received funding that will be used to help restore what is described as “the centerpiece of a potential African American historic district.”

Founded in the late 1800s to educate black children, Calfee School will be renovated into a museum and daycare. Plans also call for offices and an event center in the 13,000 square foot building.

A lawsuit to secure educational equality for the school’s students was one of the legal victories that led to the landmark Brown v. Board of Education in 1954. The school building was then used by various public and private tenants before closing in 2010.

African-American high school students in Pulaski County were forced to travel to Montgomery County daily and attend the Christiansburg Institute, as were other blacks in the New River Valley in search of public education. The order of the public school desegregation court also put an end to this system of racial discrimination.

On adjacent land, the TG Howard Community Center was established by a black minister in the early 1960s, when the local YMCA was still separate. It quickly became the focal point for African American recreation, political events, education, and vocational training before closing in 2013.

The Calfee Colonial Revival style one-story training school, built to standardized plans provided by the Virginia Board of Education, reflects the desire of state and federal governments to improve facilities and programs for ‘teaching’, declared the VDH, announcing the new historic designation of the school.

Among the 12 other sites listed on the Virginia Landmarks Register are properties that are home to Southside Virginia’s oldest continuously operating radio station, the country’s oldest horse show, and, in West Virginia, the first and possibly the only national forest recreation area for African Americans during apartheid, which was located in Alleghany County.

The Commonwealth Historical Resources Council approved the Virginia Landmarks Register lists at its quarterly public meeting on December 9.

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Mentoring memories: Spokane woman believes time spent with girls is a gift https://abilitiesnetworks.org/mentoring-memories-spokane-woman-believes-time-spent-with-girls-is-a-gift/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 08:09:08 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/mentoring-memories-spokane-woman-believes-time-spent-with-girls-is-a-gift/ [ad_1] Gifts of childhood time touched the life of Mary Carpenter, Spokane Clinic Supervisor, author and single mother. Carpenter, 45, has sought to advance these gifts over the past nine years by mentoring girls she met through her daughter’s school, counselors and church. Some children have moved, but today she mentors seven girls between the […]]]>


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Gifts of childhood time touched the life of Mary Carpenter, Spokane Clinic Supervisor, author and single mother.

Carpenter, 45, has sought to advance these gifts over the past nine years by mentoring girls she met through her daughter’s school, counselors and church. Some children have moved, but today she mentors seven girls between the ages of 13 and 17, many of whom live in low-income households or with foster families.

She seeks to provide them with community experiences, including opportunities to meet in the park, write letters to residents of an assisted living facility and see the Christmas lights. She asked them for tickets to the theater and ballets and to Green Bluff. During her childhood years in Michigan, a Christian author did the same for her and a few other girls in a ministry where her father worked.

“Nancy DeMoss (Wolgemuth), writer and radio host, actually used to take the girls out of the ministry once a year and take us to a play and dinner, and then she would make us sit down and think about it. : ‘What are our goals for the future?’ Carpenter said.

“She would really spend time talking and investing in our lives. It had such an impact on me, and I thought, someday, I want to do it. She was a great role model. “

At the same time, her parents, Kenneth and Rachel Carpenter, have long served as role models of service, sacrifice and giving, she said. They have volunteered as Union Gospel Mission chaplains, served with Hospice, and helped neighbors and others through the church. Carpenter credits the domino effect for giving rather than everything she’s done.

“I think every one of us in life has had someone who spoke kind words to encourage us at a crucial time,” she said.

Carpenter moved to Spokane from South Carolina nine years ago to be close to his family. Her daughter started school at South Pines Elementary, where Carpenter volunteered and began asking questions about families or children in difficulty. Today, she says that such needs often find her and that she is now able to give more.

Her daily job is as a supervisor at the Spokane Educational Health Clinic, helping to supervise staff and provide training. With a background in psychology and management, she previously worked for Hospice as a coordinator and manager of volunteers. At the clinic, she is part of a management team for the facility that includes family medicine, internal medicine, a psychiatric residency, infectious disease physicians and an obstetrics clinic.

As an author, she is also one of the artists selected for the 2021 Spokane Arts Grant Awards, specifically a $ 10,000 grant for a book and teaching project. Carpenter helps create “Ponies in the Park,” a picture book with a story written by her and illustrated by artist, author and former educator Mary Pat Kanaley. The book, which teaches children about the sculptures and history of Riverfront Park, is due out April 1 with preorders on poneysinthepark.com.

“It’s a sweet little story about how moonlight mixed with magical dust brings the Carousel and all the art of the park to life,” Carpenter said. “It’s a magical story that teaches.”

She said part of the grant money will go to donate a book to every second-grade teacher in the area, and then a book will also go to every elementary school library to help teach children and children. interested in art and history in Spokane. .

On numerous trips to Riverfront Park over the years with her daughter, and also bringing many girls she mentored, Carpenter loved to make up stories with them based on these visits. It helped inspire the book, she said, but Carpenter also winks at her father.

“It was the many hours he spent making up stories with me that developed my interest and my ability to create stories,” she said. “He used to start a story and leave it in a certain place, then keep me going. We would trade intermittently in this process. It was a tradition that I also carried on with my daughter and sometimes the girls that I mentored, when they were young, of course.

“My daughter and I, along with my lovely daughters, have spent many hours venturing into Riverfront Park over the years. We have many fond memories of ice skating, riding the merry-go-round, picnicking and exploring this beautiful park. Riverfront has fond memories of me.

She also has a story about the importance of giving Christmas as a child. In that first nonprofit, Life Action Ministries, where her father and Wolgemuth held roles, Carpenter’s family lived off the support given to her by giving to people, she said. One Christmas when she was around 7, the family was on a tight budget for gifts.

“My parents knew a family that had urgent needs and they were struggling to meet basic needs,” Carpenter said. “We got together as a family and my parents shared the needs of the other family. “

Her parents wanted each family member to think about whether to spend their own budget on gifts or use that money for the other family for Christmas. Each member of the family was allowed to weigh because if he decided to help, all of the Carpenter family would sacrifice themselves.

“The decision was unanimous. We would do without Christmas to support the other family. Well, it is only by giving that you can receive more than you already have.

“We have given anonymously to this family to meet their needs, but in an incredible turn of events, God has given us Christmas as well. Much to our amazement, we were blessed with a surprise bag of gifts left at our doorstep. Someone had bought gifts for each of us children. We will never know who this gentle and generous person was who blessed us in this way.

Carpenter said she would never forget the doll named Mandy with brown hair and a little yellow gingham dress in this Christmas sack, nor her enthusiasm for God’s provision. It grew her faith and strengthened her desire to invest in the lives of others, she added.

Watching the unexpected power of this over the years, Carpenter said she believes there is no greater joy in life than giving. “I think Winston Churchill said it best.” We make a living by what we get. We make a living by what we give. “

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students from the West of Lyon gain teaching experience | News https://abilitiesnetworks.org/students-from-the-west-of-lyon-gain-teaching-experience-news/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 23:00:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/students-from-the-west-of-lyon-gain-teaching-experience-news/ [ad_1] INWOOD — Working with elementary school students is what Tory Ulmer, a junior at Lycée Ouest de Lyon, looks forward to three times a week. “Their family life stories and fun classroom moments are amazing,” said Ulmer, one of 13 Wildcats enrolled in Kristin Rockhill’s Introductory Education course this semester. Rockhill began offering the […]]]>


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INWOOD — Working with elementary school students is what Tory Ulmer, a junior at Lycée Ouest de Lyon, looks forward to three times a week.

“Their family life stories and fun classroom moments are amazing,” said Ulmer, one of 13 Wildcats enrolled in Kristin Rockhill’s Introductory Education course this semester.

Rockhill began offering the course in 2018, when its university department – Family and Consumer Sciences – began to focus more on identifying and meeting professional and community needs in the district.

“We wanted to have a class that focuses on teaching as a career because a lot of kids in our area are going into teaching, but they just don’t have the opportunity to work on those skills at the high school level.” Rockhill said.

The Introductory Education course therefore gives students a glimpse into the life of an educator while providing them with a real-life experience in the classroom. It also helps students decide whether or not they want to pursue a teaching degree after high school.

The class, which is offered to sophomores, juniors and seniors, meets every day of the school week. There are no prerequisite courses that students must take; However, Rockhill would prefer students to have completed Child Development I and II before enrolling in Intro to Education if that fits their schedule.

During the first quarter of the semester, Intro to Education students learn about different careers in education, how to create lesson plans, and how diverse educational environments can be.

Then, on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays of the second term, students spend the class period working with other teachers in the district.

“They’re pretty much the teacher’s shadow. Sometimes the teachers – if the student is comfortable – they just throw them up and say, “Hey, take this bunch of kids.” In some classrooms, they take the students and do private lessons with them, ”said Rockhill.

Students also create bulletin boards for their designated teachers’ classrooms and end the semester by teaching an entire lesson on their own.

On days when there is no class, students are back in the Rockhill room where she runs organized classes or brings in staff from West Lyon to talk to the class about other related careers. to education that does not involve teaching.

Not all Rockhill students seek to become teachers, but they still benefit from the Introduction to Education as it gives them experience of working with people.

“If you wanted to be a pastor, if you wanted to be an activity coordinator – any kind of career that works with other people, this class will serve that purpose and give you those professional skills,” Rockhill said.

Madisyn Newborg, for example, aspires to become a medical assistant but wanted to take the course to learn how to communicate better with children.

“I will most likely have to see children regularly at my job, so learning how to communicate with them effectively will be important and this course has really helped me learn how to do it,” Newborg said.

Two other older people – Sydney Blom and Hadley Dake – are considering pursuing a career in education and said Rockhill’s class has helped them prepare for such a path.

To match students with other classes in the school, Rockhill asks them what grade level they want to work in and in what content area. Many of his students this semester are helping in elementary classrooms, although one has requested to be in a high school Spanish class.

“Because they are high school students, I tried to find a classroom that has a ninth grade class so that there is an age separation,” Rockhill said.

Grade 2 teacher Jill Meyer has been assisted by Intro to Education students in her classes for the past few years and enjoys the chance to bond with them as they in turn get to know her elementary students. Sophomore Amber Rose – who wants to become an art teacher – worked with Meyer in the second term of this semester.

“They love her because she’s very creative,” said Meyer, explaining how Rose draws a picture for the class each day she visits that goes to a lucky winner who is selected at random.

For Rockhill, one of the most interesting aspects of his students working face-to-face with younger peers is the relationships they form with these students. At the same time, high school students are able to appreciate everything teachers do for their job, which may not be apparent from a student’s perspective.

“Like ‘OK, that’s why they’re doing this and that’s why we organize the way we do it,’ it kind of gives them that a-ha moment,” said Rockhill.

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