covid pandemic – Abilities Networks http://abilitiesnetworks.org/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 14:40:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-4.png covid pandemic – Abilities Networks http://abilitiesnetworks.org/ 32 32 “Ninja Challenge” fundraiser for Southborough baseball to attend training camp – March 27 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/ninja-challenge-fundraiser-for-southborough-baseball-to-attend-training-camp-march-27/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 14:40:52 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/ninja-challenge-fundraiser-for-southborough-baseball-to-attend-training-camp-march-27/ by Beth to March 16, 2022 Above: Kids can have fun challenging themselves on a nearby obstacle course while families help raise money for a team of 12 to attend training camp this spring. (images from USA Ninja Challenge website and flyer) As those of you who have been involved with Southborough Youth Baseball probably […]]]>

by Beth to March 16, 2022

Above: Kids can have fun challenging themselves on a nearby obstacle course while families help raise money for a team of 12 to attend training camp this spring. (images from USA Ninja Challenge website and flyer)

As those of you who have been involved with Southborough Youth Baseball probably know, each year the 12-year-old team attends a special training camp in Cooperstown, NY. This year, the organizers are promoting a special fundraiser to help defray costs.

Ninja Challenge Fundraiser for Cooperstown FlyerThe event will take place on March 27 at the Marlborough location of the USA Ninja Challenge. It’s an indoor obstacle course for ages 4-17 that appears to be inspired by the reality show American ninja warriors.

Their website describes it as combining “basic skill sets of gymnastics, rock climbing, cross-training, and athletics.”

Families can register children for a one-hour time slot (first come, first served) for $30 per child. Hours are listed as 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. or 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

To reserve a time, attendees should email marlborough@usaninjachallenge.com. (To complete registration, click here to pay and here to sign a waiver.)

Those unable to participate can still support the cause through the team’s gofundme page:

12u baseball team (cropped image from flyer)Getting to Cooperstown All-Star Village, the birthplace of baseball, is a dream come true for any Little League player! Historically in Southborough, the 12-year-old team had the opportunity to experience the Cooperstown tournament camp with the exception of summers affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. They grew as players, as a team and created memories they will always remember.

Our team is now made up of 12 people and has the chance to go but we need your help to raise funds to offset the cost of the team training program and transportation! Anything you can do to help is greatly appreciated!


]]>
Valley News – Out & About: Windsor County mentoring grows https://abilitiesnetworks.org/valley-news-out-about-windsor-county-mentoring-grows/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 04:35:13 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/valley-news-out-about-windsor-county-mentoring-grows/ Published: 03/14/2022 00:32:51 Modified: 03/14/2022 00:32:10 WINDSOR — For nearly half a century, adult mentors have helped children in Windsor County meet life’s challenges. Now, Windsor County Mentors are extending their reach across the river to Sullivan County to help youth ages 5-18. “People really came out of nowhere saying ‘we have kids, we have […]]]>

Published: 03/14/2022 00:32:51

Modified: 03/14/2022 00:32:10

WINDSOR — For nearly half a century, adult mentors have helped children in Windsor County meet life’s challenges.

Now, Windsor County Mentors are extending their reach across the river to Sullivan County to help youth ages 5-18.

“People really came out of nowhere saying ‘we have kids, we have kids, we have kids,'” said Matthew Garcia, executive director of the Windsor-based nonprofit. “Surprisingly, we were overwhelmed with the response.”

Now the staff is trying to recruit volunteers who want to work with young people, especially in Claremont and Newport. While the organization had long wanted to expand, Garcia said the plans came to fruition when he was approached by people in Sullivan County. community and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Health, which provided them with a $15,000 grant to launch the program.

“In my job, I was really talking to a lot of people in the community, a lot of school staff, law enforcement, anybody and everybody I could talk to,” said Deryn Smith, Partnership Coordinator. in Community Health at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Population Health and Substance Abuse Prevention Coordinator for the Greater Sullivan County Regional Public Health Network. “Overall, everyone was on the same page that young people need mentors.”

The problem was that no one had the capacity or ability to create a mentorship program from scratch. Instead, Smith reached out to Garcia who shared his goal of expanding into Sullivan County.

“People said there was a need and we said ‘hey, let’s see if we can meet that need,'” Garcia said.

Both Smith and Garcia said it has worked well so far.

“It was honestly perfect timing,” Smith said. “The reaction and response we’ve had from people in the community about the startup has been amazing. So we’re super excited and proud of that.

Since the program launched earlier this year, staff from schools, recreation services and the Family Treatment Court, among other institutions, have referred dozens of children who would benefit from mentoring.

“The list of kids who will use this program is so long,” Smith said. “Recruiting the kids was super easy, but it’s definitely harder to get those reliable adults.”

Garcia said the organization already has a pool of interested mentors and matches with the kids will begin in the coming weeks.

“We look at the interests of the child and the adult and try to put them together,” Garcia said.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, child referrals had slowed and mentors were eager to resume volunteering. Typically, the organization has between 40 and 60 pairs. Mentors must be 21 years of age or older. They go through a thorough background check process. Once matched, they are asked to spend two hours a week with their mentees. If pairing is through a school, this time is one hour per week and the pairs meet at the student’s school.

“We try to match a mentor and mentee as close geographically as possible because we want them to be able to come together,” Garcia said.

While the organization requires a mentor to commit for a year, it’s not uncommon for these pairs to be together for five or six years. Smith pointed to evidence that shows young people who have adult mentors are more likely to graduate from high school and less likely to engage in substance abuse.

“It means having a reliable connection that they could meet with, learn from, feel safe, talk about what’s going on at home, at school, any stressors in their lives,” he said. she declared. “Mentoring in general has such a good outcome.”

Editor’s Note: For more information about volunteering and to complete an application, visit wcmentors.org, email info@wcmentors.org, or call 802-674-5101. Liz Sauchelli can be reached at esauchelli@vnews.com or 603-727-3221.

]]>
Family and Child Development Coaching with Phoebe MacRae https://abilitiesnetworks.org/family-and-child-development-coaching-with-phoebe-macrae/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 18:30:14 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/family-and-child-development-coaching-with-phoebe-macrae/ “Phoebe MacRae, classical singer and brain connection expert, helps children with disabilities live beyond limits.” Maximize children’s potential by forming new brain patterns and connections PORTLAND, GOLD – Infancy and toddlerhood are widely considered to be the most critical stages of brain development. Yes, the brain changes throughout life, but from birth until around age […]]]>

“Phoebe MacRae, classical singer and brain connection expert, helps children with disabilities live beyond limits.”

Maximize children’s potential by forming new brain patterns and connections

PORTLAND, GOLD – Infancy and toddlerhood are widely considered to be the most critical stages of brain development. Yes, the brain changes throughout life, but from birth until around age seven, children are constantly forming new brain patterns. This is the time when parents can step up their leadership role to support their children’s development.

Children who have missed developmental milestones or disabilities, in particular, often need exceptional leaders to fully access their learning brains. With the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact, including the use of face masks, increased screen use and rising levels of anxiety among children and adults, children need the leadership of their parents to optimize their baby’s development in terms of speech, language and social skills. .

Phoebe MacRae, CEO of Brilliant Movement, Anat Baniel Method® NeuroMovement® practitioner and creator of the Simple Songs and Gentle Moves program, helps parents learn how to be fantastic leaders for their child(ren). Parents learn to form rich and dynamic bonds with their developing children in a time when life is becoming increasingly difficult. In addition to her expertise and credentials as a coach, Phoebe has extensive musical experience. She is an award-winning graduate of the University of British Columbia’s Master of Music program and has been singing professionally for 25 years.

As a professional coach, lifelong singer, and mother of three, Phoebe brings a unique skill set and perspective to family and child development coaching. Her Simple Songs and Gentle Moves program combines natural, easy and brain-boosting NeuroMovement® exercises with the gentle power of music. Under her guidance, parents learn to sing and play with their babies or young children in a way that optimizes their little brain for connection and development. During the program, parents gain a better understanding of the growing brain and how brain patterns are formed. They learn slow, gentle movements that generate new possibilities for learning and functioning.

Unlike many therapists and coaches who seek to “fix” or solve a problem, Phoebe is much more focused on guiding her students down a path that will help them easily form new brain connections and intelligence, by optimizing their physical, mental and emotional abilities. well-being.

“The process I use is a paradigm shift from traditional therapies (physical, occupational, speech/language) that focus on ‘fixing’ the child. I focus on connecting rather than fixing. This approach provides the best conditions for brain connections to form easily and naturally, resulting in endless potential for growth.

Raising children during a pandemic is no small feat and Phoebe is committed to ensuring that parents receive all the support they need at this time, whether their child is born with or without a disability. As a result, the 60-minute Simple Songs and Gentle Moves program is now offered virtually worldwide.

For more information about Phoebe, Brilliant Movement and her Simple Songs and Gentle Moves program, visit her website today. Parents can find out if it would work for them and their kids by booking a free 20-minute discovery call with Phoebe here.

Media Contact
Company Name: Brilliant movement
Contact: Phoebe MacRae
E-mail: Send an email
Town: PORTLAND
State: WHERE
The country: United States
Website: www.brilliantmovement.net

]]>
Children’s mentorship program seeks volunteers – The Morning Sun https://abilitiesnetworks.org/childrens-mentorship-program-seeks-volunteers-the-morning-sun/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 20:11:51 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/childrens-mentorship-program-seeks-volunteers-the-morning-sun/ Mid-Michigan Big Brothers/Big Sisters recently sold its office building in Clare and moved away, and its executive director said he should help the nonprofit provide more programs for children than he serves. The parent organization made the decision shortly before hiring Dan Manley as executive director and shared it with him during the interview process. […]]]>

Mid-Michigan Big Brothers/Big Sisters recently sold its office building in Clare and moved away, and its executive director said he should help the nonprofit provide more programs for children than he serves.

The parent organization made the decision shortly before hiring Dan Manley as executive director and shared it with him during the interview process. They distanced themselves for much of the COVID-19 pandemic and found it worked well for them.

“So let’s make it a permanent thing,” Manley said.

This reduced morning commutes in some cases between counties to get to the home office, saving employees money, he said. Better than that, however, is that at least some of the money from the sale of the building will be invested in activities for children that benefit the organization’s mission.

To go along with this, Mid-Michigan BBBS is looking for mentors. The organization currently mentors 89 children in Gratiot, Montcalm, Mecosta, Osceola, Clare, Roscommon and Gladwin counties, but in the past has served up to 100.

The mentorship part involves helping adults develop healthy relationships with children who need adult role models. The one-to-one relationship helps kids from disadvantaged backgrounds develop the skills and confidence to succeed in ways they never thought possible.

A girl who never thought she would mean much is now preparing to go to college in large part because of her big sister, Manley said.

The key to a successful relationship is pairing children between the ages of 5 and 10. Manley calls this the “sweet spot”. The organization will match children up to age 18, when they have left the program.

This allows children and adults to bond as the child reaches adolescence and becomes busier.

While the organization asks adults to commit for at least a year, typically adults who click with their little ones stick around much longer, he said. Often it becomes a friendship that lasts a lifetime. And children who grow up through the program often become volunteer mentors later on.

Another key is pairing people with common interests.

“You want to see that connection,” Manley said.

When it comes to activities, Manley said he insists the personal connection is what’s most important.

“It’s not about the money you spend on that child,” he said.

BBBS offers activities for adult-kid matches, he said. There was pizza and movie night on Friday, and last summer they had water balloon fights and a nature walk.

They also have educational programs, like how to balance a checking account and another on online safety. During the pandemic, they did some online activities. This includes three spelling bees.

“It was a blast,” he said.

Matching children with adults does not happen overnight, he warned. There is a thorough background check and the organization wants to make sure both adults and children fit in well.

Once matched, BBBS stays in touch with volunteers, children and guardians to make sure the match works. The social worker can offer advice to help smooth out rocky spots. Staying in touch also helps the organization keep up to date with what might be good low cost activities.

]]>
How Warren Morris went from the White House to mentoring children https://abilitiesnetworks.org/how-warren-morris-went-from-the-white-house-to-mentoring-children/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 03:00:16 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/how-warren-morris-went-from-the-white-house-to-mentoring-children/ Warren Morris currently resides in Virginia, but he learned most of his life lessons growing up in Gadsden. This upbringing “impacted my life in many ways,” Morris recalls. Now, as he nears retirement after a distinguished career in the military and government service, he would like to share those lessons, helping others “become the best […]]]>

Warren Morris currently resides in Virginia, but he learned most of his life lessons growing up in Gadsden.

This upbringing “impacted my life in many ways,” Morris recalls.

Now, as he nears retirement after a distinguished career in the military and government service, he would like to share those lessons, helping others “become the best versions of themselves, even when nobody don’t look,” through his youth counseling service, With Essential Means LLC, and as an author.

“As a young man growing up without a father figure at home, I watched how hard-working and struggling my mother was to care for her six children,” Morris said. “I knew very young that I had to help my mother.”

He started doing this in seventh grade, working weekends for Doug Ward in his summer trailer remodeling business. Until his mother’s death, Morris always gave her part of his salary to help pay the household bills.

]]>
RBI revokes PC Financial Services registration over KYC breaches https://abilitiesnetworks.org/rbi-revokes-pc-financial-services-registration-over-kyc-breaches/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 12:36:27 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/rbi-revokes-pc-financial-services-registration-over-kyc-breaches/ Mumbai: The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) announced on Thursday that it has canceled the certificate of registration of PC Financial Services Private Ltd, the company behind the digital lending app Cashbean. The company’s registration was revoked due to oversight concerns such as flagrant violations of RBI’s guidelines on outsourcing and knowing your clients’ standards, […]]]>

Mumbai: The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) announced on Thursday that it has canceled the certificate of registration of PC Financial Services Private Ltd, the company behind the digital lending app Cashbean.

The company’s registration was revoked due to oversight concerns such as flagrant violations of RBI’s guidelines on outsourcing and knowing your clients’ standards, RBI said.

Controversy over loan apps has exploded amid the covid-19 pandemic when laid-off people have been forced to seek out quick loans, often with one-click loan apps. However, when borrowers could not repay these loans, which carried exorbitant interest rates, companies resorted to coercive collection tactics.

RBI said the company also charges usurious interest rates and other fees to its borrowers in an opaque manner, in addition to engaging in unauthorized use of the RBI and Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) logos for collection. from borrowers in flagrant violation. of the code of good practice.

“In exercise of the powers conferred under Section 45-IA(6)(iv) of the Reserve Bank of India Act 1934, the Reserve Bank has canceled the certificate of registration ( CoR) issued to M/s PC Financial Services Pvt Ltd., New Delhi As such, M/s PC Financial Services Private Limited shall not transact the business of a Non-Banking Financial Institution (NBFI), as defined to subsection (a) of Section 45-I of the RBI Act of 1934,” RBI said in a statement on its website.

In November last year, a committee set up by the central bank suggested limiting controversial digital lending apps through a mix of regulations, including the creation of a nodal agency to verify their credentials and legislation to prevent “illegal lending”.

The goal of the report was to improve customer protection and secure the digital lending ecosystem while encouraging innovation. The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) had set up a task force on digital lending, including online platforms and mobile apps, led by its executive director Jayant Kumar Dash in January 2021 after allegations of coercive tactics by Debt recovery.

According to the committee’s findings, around 1,100 loan apps were available for Indian Android users between January 1 and February 28. Of those, 600 were illegal, the panel found.

Meanwhile, the PTI news agency reported on February 9 that a FEMA competent authority confirmed the seizure of Funds worth 288 crores from a Chinese-owned Non-Banking Financial Company (NBFC) who lent instant loans through mobile apps and then allegedly harassed borrowers by misusing their personal data. He said an order had been issued by the Commissioner of Customs, Chennai on February 4 confirming the full seizure of funds in the action against “PC Financial Services NBFC”, citing a statement from the Management of the Law Enforcement (ED).

To subscribe to Mint Bulletins

* Enter a valid email address

* Thank you for subscribing to our newsletter.

Never miss a story! Stay connected and informed with Mint. Download our app now!!

]]>
For Concord-area youth, mentoring can create lifelong connections https://abilitiesnetworks.org/for-concord-area-youth-mentoring-can-create-lifelong-connections/ Sat, 12 Feb 2022 23:36:52 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/for-concord-area-youth-mentoring-can-create-lifelong-connections/ The first time Michael Franklin met Andy Julian, he was a little worried. At 13, Franklin was wary of new people and didn’t know what to expect from the mentorship program he joined at his grandmother’s suggestion. Nor had he realized that Julian, a veterinarian, had nine dogs, four cats, six horses, goats, llamas, alpacas […]]]>

The first time Michael Franklin met Andy Julian, he was a little worried.

At 13, Franklin was wary of new people and didn’t know what to expect from the mentorship program he joined at his grandmother’s suggestion. Nor had he realized that Julian, a veterinarian, had nine dogs, four cats, six horses, goats, llamas, alpacas and sheep in his Canterbury home.

“I was like, ‘That’s a lot of animals,'” Franklin recalled with a laugh. “I was a bit nervous, especially with all the dogs barking. But I’m a really good dog person.

Julian and Franklin were paired as a mentor and mentee five years ago through the Friends Youth Mentorship Program, which matches Merrimack County children ages 6 to 17 with a mentor who can serve positive role model and advocate.

On a recent Thursday, Franklin, who is now 17 and a senior at Merrimack Valley High School, and Julian, who is 61, sat in a sunny corner of a McDonald’s on Fisherville Road in Penacook – the same spot where they met on their first day of mentoring. Julian, who was a first-time mentor when he was paired with Franklin, says he joined the program because he wanted to make a difference and offer a young person advice he didn’t have. maybe not at home. Franklin, who lives with his grandmother, said he joined the program because he didn’t have a father figure in his life.

“I wasn’t in the best place, but I didn’t want to tell anyone that I didn’t know everything, about how I felt and about my life,” Franklin said. “When I finally had a connection, he helped me.”

Over the past five years, Julian and Franklin have hiked, played disc golf and drank countless cups of coffee. Julian taught Franklin how to drive a car – including a manual transmission – and helped him get the practice hours he needed for his license. They did house repair projects, working on small houses to renovate. Franklin even completed his senior project observing at Pembroke Veterinary Hospital, Julian’s veterinary practice, where he observed animal exams, surgeries, and euthanasia.

Now Franklin says he considers Julian his father, and Julian – who has two daughters – refers to Franklin as the son he never had.

“Whenever I meet someone for the first time, I always hesitate about them, like I can’t trust them. But I slowly started to trust them and open up to them” Franklin said, “It’s pretty cool that I was his first mentee and he was my first mentor. It means a lot. It certainly wasn’t a mistake to match us.”

The need for mentors is high in the Concord area as the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted recruitment numbers and the organization’s outreach capabilities. Lily Wellington, director of volunteer programs at the Friends Program, says they currently have a waiting list of 80 children looking for mentors.

The program was originally established in 1975 as “junior-senior friends”, to provide role models for young people involved in the juvenile justice system or on the cusp of it. Today, the program has an average of 100 active mentor pairs per year. Many of the children involved are from new American families.

“Some 30 years later, we are now operating with the same theory, which is that if you provide a positive and caring role model invested in the development of an at-risk youth, you can make a big difference to those outcomes,” Wellington said. .

All mentors go through a selection process that includes an application, interview, home visit, background check and driving check, are matched with a child based on common interests or skills, and are asked to spend about one to three hours a week with their mentee.

Julian says one thing he’s learned is that he can be a mentor just by being himself, without having to do anything “spectacular”.

“Pick up the phone and call them. You don’t have to embark on a grand adventure,” Julian said. “Sometimes I pick him up, we have coffee and that’s about it, or walk the dogs or something.”

Franklin plans to graduate from high school, after which he hopes to study criminal justice at NHTI and Franklin Pierce University. He has big dreams of becoming a police officer who values ​​diversity, has the skills to defuse mental health crisis situations, and is not afraid to risk his life to help people in times of need.

“What motivates me is just knowing that I can make an impact,” Franklin said. “Even though I’m just one person, I can just spread positivity to everyone and they spread it and say, ‘This officer is a good officer. ”

The Friends program only requires a one-year committee from its participants, but many choose to go beyond that. Julian and Franklin both agree that they will have a lifelong friendship. They are already discussing plans to renovate more old houses in the future.

“It’s not like, ‘Oh, the program is over, see you later,'” Julian said. “He’s my son now, so I’ll be there for him forever.”

Those interested in signing up to become mentors can learn more at www.friendsprogram.org.

]]>
New attempt to reduce advances on NM loan interest rate ceiling https://abilitiesnetworks.org/new-attempt-to-reduce-advances-on-nm-loan-interest-rate-ceiling/ Sat, 29 Jan 2022 23:21:10 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/new-attempt-to-reduce-advances-on-nm-loan-interest-rate-ceiling/ A truck heads east along historic Route 66 in Albuquerque in this 2017 photo, past a sign advertising a securities lending business. New Mexico lawmakers are considering lowering the current 175% state cap on small loan interest rates during this year’s 30-day legislative session. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan) SANTA FE — It may seem like […]]]>
A truck heads east along historic Route 66 in Albuquerque in this 2017 photo, past a sign advertising a securities lending business. New Mexico lawmakers are considering lowering the current 175% state cap on small loan interest rates during this year’s 30-day legislative session. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan)

SANTA FE — It may seem like déjà vu at the Roadhouse, but a bill dealing with how New Mexico limits interest rates on storefront loans is on the way again.

A year after a similar measure died in a standoff between House and Senate members, a new proposal lowering the annual cap on interest rates on small loans — from 175% to 36% — has passed Saturday by its first House committee.

“It’s truly a financial epidemic,” said Rep. Susan Herrera, D-Embudo, who said more than 20 percent of residents have taken out such loans in about half of New Mexico’s counties.

She also said out-of-state companies have moved into New Mexico to take advantage of low-income residents who need quick access to cash.

However, just like last year, critics of the legislation argued that lowering the state cap on interest-rate loans could put businesses out of business and leave their employees unemployed.

They have argued in the past that such a policy change would push borrowers to use internet lenders, many of which are based in other countries and cannot be regulated.

Danielle Fagre Arlowe of the American Financial Services Association, a Washington DC-based group, said the bill would make it harder for people with bad credit to get loans.

“Low-income residents will likely find themselves in credit deserts if (this bill) passes,” she told members of the House Consumer Affairs and Public Affairs Committee.

But the committee ultimately voted 3-2 to approve the measure, with Democrats voting in favor and Republicans voting against.

This year’s legislation, House Bill 132, is sponsored by a bipartisan group of five lawmakers, including House Speaker Brian Egolf, D-Santa Fe. It would lower the state’s interest rate cap on loans showcase, but would also increase the maximum amount of these loans from $5,000 to $10,000.

In its original form, the bill also included a $180,000 credit for financial education efforts in New Mexico schools, but that was removed from the legislation Saturday at Herrera’s request.

Under current state law, proponents of the bill said storefront loan companies currently target the state’s Native American population and low-income areas.

Additionally, a December survey of Latinos in New Mexico found that 19% of adults had taken out a storefront loan during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“People say it helps – it doesn’t help,” said Leonard Gorman, executive director of the Navajo Nation Human Rights Commission, who described current interest rates on many small loans as “harmful” to those who have trouble repaying them.

New Mexico has a long history of regulating the lending industry.

A previous 36% cap on loan interest rates was abolished by the Legislature in the 1980s amid high inflation, according to research by Santa Fe-based Think New Mexico, which has is pushing for the lower rate cap to be reinstated.

After years of Roundhouse debate, lawmakers passed a 2017 bill that established the current 175% interest rate cap on small loans and banned so-called payday loans with terms of less than 120 days.

But critics have insisted that the 175% cap can leave low-income New Mexicans stuck in “debt traps,” while pointing out that the US armed forces have implemented an annual rate limit in 36% percentage for loans obtained by active duty military personnel.

The Roundhouse debate has caught the attention of many national businesses who have hired lobbyists to represent their interests.

During last year’s legislative session, a credit industry lobbyist said the industry employs about 1,300 people across New Mexico.

Additionally, small loan companies made $140,000 in campaign contributions to New Mexico candidates and political committees during the 2020 election cycle, according to a recent report by New Mexico Ethics Watch.

The bill to cap interest rates on loans is now before the House Judiciary Committee with less than three weeks remaining in this year’s 30-day legislative session.

]]>
Transitions from Vieth to teaching, coaching https://abilitiesnetworks.org/transitions-from-vieth-to-teaching-coaching/ Tue, 25 Jan 2022 15:46:02 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/transitions-from-vieth-to-teaching-coaching/ GLEN CARBON — Paul Vieth has taken another step to follow in the path of his former teachers and coaches at Edwardsville High School. A 1996 EHS graduate, Vieth was a standout offensive lineman for the 1995 EHS football team, which went 11-1 and reached the Class 5A quarterfinals. He then played at Illinois State […]]]>

GLEN CARBON — Paul Vieth has taken another step to follow in the path of his former teachers and coaches at Edwardsville High School.

A 1996 EHS graduate, Vieth was a standout offensive lineman for the 1995 EHS football team, which went 11-1 and reached the Class 5A quarterfinals. He then played at Illinois State University.

Vieth is now in his third year coaching girls’ and boys’ volleyball at Father McGivney High School. In 2021, he left a 25-year career in retail management to become a full-time math teacher and coach at FMCHS.

“I always wanted to be a teacher and my whole family apart from my dad who was a barber has been in the education business,” said Vieth, 43, who recently quit as a women’s volleyball player. coach, but will continue to coach the boys. “My mother has a doctorate in education and worked in an early childhood center and my sister worked for her.

“My brother (Dave Vieth) is an assistant principal at Mattoon High School and he’s a former baseball coach in Nashville and Valmeyer. In college, I changed my major from business to education, but I knew that there wasn’t a lot of money in education, and I ended up going into retail.I don’t regret it, but education has always been my passion.

Vieth, who was an inventory control manager for RP Lumber Company, planned his career change at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic when he started taking online classes at the University of Phoenix. He is preparing a master’s degree in secondary education.

He made the transition from retail to teaching at the start of the 2021-22 school year at Father McGivney.


“If I wasn’t able to teach full-time, I’d probably be doing a lot of supply right now,” said Vieth, who is due to get her master’s degree in August. “I can walk into the classroom and get real experience and enjoy my time at Father McGivney.

At EHS, Vieth was a freshman when Tim Dougherty took over as football coach. Dougherty guided the Tigers from 1992 to 2007 and posted a 132-40 record with 12 playoff teams, including back-to-back finalists in 2001 and 2002.

Every Wednesday, the Edwardsville Intelligencer will publish a “Where Are They Now?” story of former Edwardsville High School or Metro-East Lutheran student-athletes. If there is a former student-athlete you would like to know, please email Scott Marion at smarion@edwpub.net.


“I was there during his freshman year and I remember being in the classroom when we met him,” Vieth said. “He explained that this group of freshmen was going to be the first group he would have for the four years.

“It was amazing to see how it came to fruition and we ended up being the team that we were. It brings back a lot of great memories for me.”

After posting records of 6-3 in 1992, 6-4 in 1993 and 6-3 in 1994, Vieth’s senior year in 1995 proved to be the Tigers’ breakthrough. They won their first 11 games, including the first two rounds of the playoffs.

“I think it has a lot to do with what we did before this season, including my freshman year in 1995 when we had the teachers’ strike (which forced the Tigers to give up their first two games)” , said Vieth. “I shout out to a lot of upperclassmen because we went to their house and bonded a lot.

“It’s made football so much more important. When something you care about so much is taken away from you for a short time, it sharpens your focus. The coaching staff, with Coach Dougherty and all his assistants, were on the same wavelength and delivered the same message. It was a combination of great players with a lot of heart, restlessness and desire.

For the 1995 Tigers, the playoffs began with a 28-22 first-round win over Bloomington, which was followed by a 40-12 second-round win over Cahokia.

In the Class 5A quarterfinals, East St. Louis scored the game-winning touchdown with 17 seconds to beat EHS 32-26.

In the second half, EHS quarterback Jimmie Dougherty broke his ankle, initially diagnosed as a sprained ankle. He entered the game in the fourth quarter to score the extra point to tie the game.

“It was a game that they could probably make a movie out of,” Vieth said. “You start with the weather and the ice cover on the pitch and all the back and forth of the game. You had Jimmie kicking extra with a broken foot and Ryan Jumper coming in at QB (for Dougherty) and doing a great job.

“We had guys who stepped up and made plays when they needed to. It was a tough game and we left everything on the pitch, but we couldn’t get the win.

Vieth’s success on the offensive and defensive lines at EHS was enough to earn him a scholarship to Illinois State, where he played for three seasons.

“The ISU was kind of the perfect storm for me,” Vieth said. “I visited a few other schools like Eastern Illinois and Indiana State, but got a phone call one morning from Coach Dougherty, who told me an ISU coach was there. and they wanted me to come see a movie with them.

“We were watching a video of a play where he was impressed that I was on the opposite side on the defensive line and taking a chasing angle to chase the running back. It was one of those plays where I tell kids that you never know when it’s going to happen or what’s going to be filmed. That’s why you give 100% all the time and it’s a game that impressed that coach and that helped me get the ball rolling.

In his junior year at ISU, Vieth had a starting job on the offensive line at left guard, but at the end of the season he had to hang up his cleats for medical reasons.

Vieth transferred to SIUE, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration with a major in marketing.

He then embarked on a career in retail management, working 10 years for Home Depots in Alton, Edwardsville and O’Fallon, Missouri, before spending 14 years at RP Lumber.

While Vieth had already spent two years at Father McGivney coaching girls and boys volleyball, it still took him a while to make the transition from retail management to teacher and coach. full-time coach.

“Anytime you change professions, there will be an adjustment period,” Vieth said. “Fortunately, my family and lots of friends being in education were able to help me if I had any questions.”

Vieth got into volleyball when his daughter, Madison, now a senior at EHS, started playing the sport at a young age.

“I was inspired by dads who went out and helped with the Little Tigers (football) program and I always thought that if you’re going to teach, make sure you know you’re teaching the right way,” Vieth said. . .

“I got involved in volunteering with the Glen-Ed Volleyball Clinics, run by Doug and Brenda Saye, and then got involved in the H2 club program. I coached with H2 for a few seasons and then my daughter started playing for the Illinois team for HP in St. Louis.

The FMCHS women’s volleyball program, meanwhile, began at the junior varsity level in 2015, while the boys completed their first varsity season in 2019.

Amanda Dreyer, who compiled a 42-44 college record in three seasons, including a 25-win season and the program’s first-ever regional and section titles in 2018, resigned as coach after the school year. 2018-19.

Vieth learned of the opening via email and felt the opportunity was too good to pass up.

“I take all the lessons I learned from my football coaches and try to pass them on to a new generation,” Vieth said. “With the girls, you take a slightly different approach, but they want to learn the same lessons.

“I also coach the boys at McGivney and our next season is coming up in March, so I’m excited about that. They’re different sports and different techniques, of course, but it’s always about involving the kids and teaching them the value of dedication and what makes a team successful.

Vieth considers one of his greatest accomplishments to be the establishment of the Edwardsville City Youth Sand Volleyball Summer League.

“I approached the city four years ago and helped them create a kids’ sand program at Winston Brown Sand Courts for kids in middle school through high school,” Vieth said. “We have grown to over 300 children who are now participating in the program.”

Vieth and his wife, Heather, live in Edwardsville, and Madison is their only child.

In addition to his full-time duties at FMCHS, Vieth does woodworking and has a side business called Vieth’s Custom Furniture.

His current coaching schedule leaves him with less time to devote to this part of his life, but that suits Vieth, who relies on his football experiences at EHS to teach his current athletes.

“Edwardsville has always been an influence on me and I love the city,” Vieth said. “I love seeing my former coaches come out and can’t wait for Tim Dougherty to enter the EHS Hall of Fame (in February). I was asked to contribute to his intro video and it was cool for me because that Coach Dougherty had a big impact on my life.

“I am honored to have been part of his program and will be there to see him inducted. His son Jimmie walks in at the same time, which makes him even more special.

]]>
Coaching by voice calls | The star https://abilitiesnetworks.org/coaching-by-voice-calls-the-star/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 23:46:37 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/coaching-by-voice-calls-the-star/ Taylor’s University School of Education recently launched a reading project to help children from disadvantaged homes catch up after their learning was interrupted by the Covid-19 pandemic. Called Projek BacaBaca, it focuses on improving children’s Bahasa Malay and English reading skills with the help of dedicated ‘reading coaches’ guiding them for six months. The project […]]]>

Taylor’s University School of Education recently launched a reading project to help children from disadvantaged homes catch up after their learning was interrupted by the Covid-19 pandemic.

Called Projek BacaBaca, it focuses on improving children’s Bahasa Malay and English reading skills with the help of dedicated ‘reading coaches’ guiding them for six months.

The project uses an evidence-based approach to improve learning outcomes and is designed to help parents and communities better support their children’s literacy development.

The coaches, who are students from Taylor’s University and Taylor’s College, provide one-on-one, tailored reading sessions to children and track their progress using mid- and end-of-course diagnostic tests.

Nine-year-old Muhammad Raiqal Faiz (left) guided by his reading coach over the phone.“Our goal for this project is to enable reading coaches to track children’s progress and eventually help children read at school level and close the learning gap resulting from the pandemic,” said Hema Letchamanan , senior lecturer at Taylor’s University School of Education.

The project is designed for students who do not have Internet access. All they need is a phone connection as the sessions are done through voice calls.

This ensures that the learning process is uninterrupted, with each session lasting just 30 minutes to keep students focused.

“We call it short and sharp sessions. Additionally, the reading materials used in this project are carefully selected to ensure engagement and active participation during the session,” said Hema, adding that it also strengthens the communication skills of the participants.

The community initiative aims to improve the reading skills of students living in poverty to ensure that they do not fall behind in their studies and to instill a love and joy of reading in children.

From one-on-one twice-weekly reading lessons with reading coaches to mentoring sessions, community initiatives like this one are also encouraging more young people to volunteer and get involved in social causes.

Phase I, which ended last month, saw 30 children from PPR Seri Alam, Cheras, Kuala Lumpur, show an 86% improvement in reading performance in English and 64% in Bahasa Melayu after just six months of participation in the program.

Projek BacaBaca is currently preparing for phase II, which will involve 100 children across the country.

Efforts like Projek BacaBaca, Hema said, are a step forward in eliminating learning poverty in Malaysia.

“Reading is a gateway to learning as a child progresses through school.

“The inability to read closes the door of learning for students as they will face difficulties in learning other areas such as math, science and humanities,” she said, adding that the pandemic has forced the most vulnerable students into the least desirable learning situations. as they face various challenges to receive the quality education they deserve.

The pandemic, Hema noted, has amplified many inequalities within society, including in education.

In 2017, data from the Unesco Institute for Statistics indicated that 617 million children and adolescents worldwide were not achieving minimum proficiency levels in reading and mathematics, she said. , adding that in 2019, the World Bank estimated that about half of children in lower and lower middle-income countries cannot read a simple paragraph by age 10.

“Learning poverty is based on the notion that every child should be in school and able to read age-appropriate text by the age of 10.

“Reading fluency is particularly important because it contributes to overall performance and academic success,” she said, adding that previous studies have also shown that children who do not read at grade level are more likely to drop out of school, and this is even more true for children living in poverty, as low reading proficiency means that children are unable to use their reading skills to excel in other subjects.

A 2018 Unicef ​​study on urban child poverty in Kuala Lumpur found that 51% of five- and six-year-old children do not attend preschool and 13% of children who are end of junior high school aren’t fluent in reading, she said.

Due to Covid-19, Unicef ​​predicts an additional 10% of children worldwide will fall into learning poverty, she added.

With the global education system disrupted, this reinforces the social divide between students, especially those who belong to vulnerable communities, as they face two main problems: lack of digital infrastructure and home environments that are not conducive to learning, she said.

“Naturally, the shift from offline to online learning has overwhelmed the school system, but these issues, especially the issue of student literacy, have always been there and the pandemic has further exacerbated these issues. .

“But it doesn’t have to be that way. Educators, schools and civil society can join hands to adopt a more empathetic approach to education, one where the student remains the central point.

“As a community, we can work together to close the learning gap.

We must meet these challenges today to build a better future for the young people of tomorrow.

]]>