New teacher and State Education Association tackle teacher shortage and share optimism

The State Education Association of Nebraska said hundreds of teachers across the state are expected to leave the profession at the end of the school year. it’s still not enough to fill the void. On Saturday afternoon, Antonio Gullie walked through the Lincoln Stage at the University of Nebraska, ready to embark on his new teaching career. “There are already two Gullies there without me,” said Antonio Gullie. He talks about his brother and sister-in-law, both of whom teach at Bryan, his alma mater. It is there that he will also teach. Her mother is also an educator. in the district. Gullie spent her last semester teaching in the Omaha Public School paid program. “It shows us that we care about what you’re going through. We’re trying to make sure you stay on board with us and just show you that we have your back and care for you,” Gullie said. “It just allows you, as a student teacher, to be more involved, because you don’t have to worry about ‘Okay, am I going to have enough money to do this and that this month? I could really focus on teaching this student and giving these students everything I have.” PAHO said the stipend helps create a pipeline of teachers. The district hopes to close the gap as it faces staffing shortages at critical levels like much of the nation. Jenni Benson of the Nebraska State Education Association said the stipend is ideal for new teachers. “If you’ve been teaching for 30 years and that you have your masters plus 36 and you give someone at the start (a stipend), yes we want to recruit them but that doesn’t mean we can’t increase the boat for everyone, ”said Benson She said it was important to listen to teachers in classrooms and said there are other immediate solutions like stipend that could be implemented for those who are already certified. excellent, retention, impo rtant, certification, college, you know kids get into it earlier,” Benson said. She said one option could be to offer a waiver for out-of-state certified teachers moving to Nebraska, or people with a master’s degree or higher. Gullie said that even with the shortage he is ready to come to class. “There are still people out there willing to come into the classroom and work with your child no matter what situation or circumstances we face because we care about this next generation and we want to see them succeed,” said Gullie.

The State Education Association of Nebraska said hundreds of teachers across the state are expected to leave the profession at the end of the school year.

The University of Nebraska at Omaha said it had graduated the most teachers in the past five years, but the state’s teachers’ union said it still wasn’t enough to fill the gap. empty.

On Saturday afternoon, Antonio Gullie walked across the stage at the University of Nebraska Lincoln, ready to embark on his new teaching career.

“There are already two Gullies there without me,” said Antonio Gullie.

He talks about his brother and sister-in-law, both of whom teach at Bryan, his alma mater. It is there that he will also teach. His mother is also an educator in the neighborhood.

Gullie spent her last semester teaching in the Omaha Public School paid program.

“It shows us that we care about the things you go through. We try to make sure you stay on board with us and just show you that we support you and take care of you,” Gullie said. “It just allows you, as a student-teacher, to be more involved, because you don’t have to worry about like, ‘Okay, am I going to have enough money to do this and that this month? ? I could really focus on teaching this student and giving these students everything I have.”

PAHO said the stipend helps build a pool of teachers.

The district hopes to bridge the gap as it faces staffing shortages at critical levels like much of the country.

Jenni Benson of the Nebraska State Education Association said the stipend was ideal for new teachers.

“If you have been teaching for 30 years and you have your masters plus 36 and you give someone at the start (a stipend), yes we want to recruit them but that does not mean that we cannot raise the boat for everyone,” Benson said.

She said it is important to listen to teachers in classrooms and said there are other immediate solutions like stipend that could be implemented for those who are already certified.

“Great recruiting, retention, important, certification, college, you know kids get into it earlier,” Benson said.

She said one option could be to offer a waiver for out-of-state certified teachers moving to Nebraska, or people with a master’s degree or higher.

Gullie said even with the shortage he is ready to step into the classroom.

“There are still people out there ready to come into the classroom and work with your child no matter what situation or circumstances we face, because we care about this next generation and we want to see them succeed,” Gullie said. .

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