Child training – Abilities Networks http://abilitiesnetworks.org/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 16:41:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-4.png Child training – Abilities Networks http://abilitiesnetworks.org/ 32 32 DVIDS – News – “A visionary leader”…a learning management guru” https://abilitiesnetworks.org/dvids-news-a-visionary-leader-a-learning-management-guru/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 16:41:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/dvids-news-a-visionary-leader-a-learning-management-guru/ FORT LEONARD WOOD, MO–An experienced warlord and tireless pioneer, Maj. Gen. (Retired) Marion Garcia has been inducted into the Military Police Regimental Association Hall of Fame. A child of hard work and ambition, Major General Garcia is the daughter of a Navy officer and an au pair-turned-travel agent, Lt. Col. (US Marine Corps, retired) Lou […]]]>

FORT LEONARD WOOD, MO–An experienced warlord and tireless pioneer, Maj. Gen. (Retired) Marion Garcia has been inducted into the Military Police Regimental Association Hall of Fame.

A child of hard work and ambition, Major General Garcia is the daughter of a Navy officer and an au pair-turned-travel agent, Lt. Col. (US Marine Corps, retired) Lou Garcia and Ms. Vivian Piaget, respectively. Lou Garcia entered the Marine Corps as a private, received his commission in Vietnam, and retired as a lieutenant colonel after 33 years of service. Vivian Piaget speaks three languages ​​fluently. While working as an au pair for an embassy family in Poland, she met Lou Garcia when he was a young Marine, stationed in Poland on embassy duty. Seeing the example of her parents as carriers of high standards, Marion Garcia knew that her calling was military service.

Young Marion Garcia entered the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1983, a school that first graduated women in 1980. When Garcia graduated from West Point in 1987, women weren’t were not allowed to engage in combat arms.

“As a female commissioned in 1987, the military police corps, which at the time was focused on combat support, was the closest thing to combat arms I could get,” Garcia said. “I wanted to be where the action was, so I asked for the military police and was lucky to get it.”

As a second lieutenant in Korea, Garcia was recognized as the best platoon leader within her battalion. She admitted “there was a shock” when her battalion commander selected her, a woman, as the best platoon leader to represent the military police in the Second Infantry Division’s Team Spirit exercise, an annual exercise combining the efforts of the Republic of Korea and the United States. State soldiers.

“I was part of a command structure that valued me as an individual and didn’t prejudge me based on superficial circumstances,” Garcia said. “The MP Corps was ahead of its time, and I always knew I was part of a team of professionals.”

Major General Garcia has seen the full spectrum of the MP world. She served as a platoon leader in Germany and Korea; commanded the Fort Hood-based headquarters and headquarters detachment of the 720th Military Police Battalion that deployed for Operation Provide Comfort in Somalia; commanded the Pennsylvania-based 324th Military Police Battalion which deployed to Baghdad, Iraq; commanded 3rd Brigade/3rd Division/75th Training Command based in Illinois; served as deputy commander of Joint Task Force Guantanamo in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba; and commanded the 200th Military Police Command, headquartered at Fort Meade, Maryland.

Garcia considers active listening to be one of his leadership tools.

“The best ideas came from the soldiers,” Garcia said, recalling his days as a battalion commander running a detention center in Iraq. “All I had to do was listen, challenge staff to fill in the details and find resources for their ideas. Working with motivated and creative young people is a blessing.

Deployment after deployment, Major General Garcia has seen the military police branch accomplish its set of multi-focal missions.

“We are unique in our support role. In peacetime, the role of law enforcement is critical to good order and discipline across the force,” Garcia said, through a lens influenced by multinational, multi-deployment experience. “During the transition to hostilities, we ensure orderly movements. In times of war, we support the flow of logistics and manage enemy prisoners as well as civilian population flows, allowing combatants to move forward. Then we come back in phases.

Proud of her pro-MP bias, Garcia said, “We don’t need to be the main effort. We are the best effort.

Maj. Gen. John F. Hussey succeeded Maj. Gen. (Retired) Garcia as commander of the 200th Military Police Command, a 14,000-man unit based at Fort Meade, Md., with brigades and battalions across the United States.

“Shift. General Garcia is one of the most doctrinally competent military police officers the regiment has ever produced,” Hussey said. “She was a training management guru who was second to none in demanding training excellence from herself and her troops.”

Lt. Col. John Mullaney served as Deputy Operations Officer (G-3) in the 200th Military Police Command for three years and then, reporting directly to Maj. Gen. Garcia from 2015 to 2017, as Commander of the headquarters and headquarters company for another three years.

“Shift. General Garcia is a visionary leader who understood the need for military police to be prepared to conduct operations in austere conditions and with imperfect or non-functional technology,” Mullaney said. “She challenged subordinate leaders to live up to their full potential and be worthy to lead America’s sons and daughters into battle”

The way Major General (Retired) Garcia was able to serve as a leader of the military police soldiers and as a leader in the field of veterinary science is, at least in part, due to his passion for education. Education is a major foundation for his progression in his military and civilian career. Major General (Retired) Garcia received his Bachelor of Science in Engineering from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1987; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from Colorado State University in 1998; a master’s degree in military strategic studies from the Army War College in 2010; and an MSc in Preventive Veterinary Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health from the Royal Veterinary College, University of London in 2015. Today, she is Director of Veterinary Services at Hybrid Turkeys.

“’Troops! For the troops! These two statements guide us daily,” Garcia said, explaining his inspiration for leadership. “They remind us of where we come from and why we exist.”

“‘Help! Protect! Defend!’ Three action verbs, all three selfless,” said Garcia, explaining his passion for service. “All three are focused on helping others. All three remind us of our duty to our fellow soldiers.









Date taken: 24.06.2022
Date posted: 24.06.2022 12:41
Story ID: 423714
Location: FORT LEONARD WOOD, MO, USA
Hometown: FORT LEONARD WOOD, MO, USA
Hometown: FORT MEADE, MD, USA





Web views: 21
Downloads: 0

PUBLIC DOMAIN

]]>
New law enforcement training focused on intellectual or developmental disabilities | Journal-news https://abilitiesnetworks.org/new-law-enforcement-training-focused-on-intellectual-or-developmental-disabilities-journal-news/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 03:00:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/new-law-enforcement-training-focused-on-intellectual-or-developmental-disabilities-journal-news/ MARTINSBURG — Beginning June 13, safe interaction training for law enforcement and people with intellectual or developmental disabilities began statewide, as officers took the lead in s arm yourself with better training for the interactions that are becoming more and more commonplace. The statewide training initiative is designed to provide comprehensive training for law enforcement […]]]>

MARTINSBURG — Beginning June 13, safe interaction training for law enforcement and people with intellectual or developmental disabilities began statewide, as officers took the lead in s arm yourself with better training for the interactions that are becoming more and more commonplace.

The statewide training initiative is designed to provide comprehensive training for law enforcement officers on safe interactions with people with intellectual or developmental disabilities, including autism spectrum disorders.

“The need for training for law enforcement officers dealing with autism spectrum disorders is critical for 21st century policing,” said First Sgt. KG Murray of the West Virginia State Police said in a statement from West Virginia University Health Services. “As parents of a young adult and a teenager with ASD, my wife and I hope that the ASD awareness training will be a very effective educational tool for all law enforcement in West Virginia, where most of our encounters with people with ASD are positive. With this training, West Virginia can be the beacon for the rest of the nation in ASD training and education for the forces. law enforcement and all first responders.

This safe interaction training for law enforcement and people with intellectual or developmental disabilities is offered in partnership with West Virginia University, the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources, and the West Virginia State Police.

Berkeley County Sheriff Nathan Harmon agreed that the training needs to be taught and better understood by all officers.

“We are seeing this more and more. I don’t need our officers to misinterpret this and identify him,” Harmon said. “I saw the need a long time ago and was surprised to find that they had never had autism awareness training.”

He added that it makes him proud to take the necessary steps to understand better.

“Having a child with a disability myself, I really respect any training that encompasses the ability to identify people with disabilities,” Harmon said. “I pray to God she’s never in a situation where things get worse just because they didn’t get it.”

He added: “Being able to not rush into a situation and identify red flags and indicators and pick them up – you have to look for them.”

To view the full version, visit https://www.hsc.wvu.edu.

]]>
More details emerge on the ADF training center https://abilitiesnetworks.org/more-details-emerge-on-the-adf-training-center/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 03:04:27 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/more-details-emerge-on-the-adf-training-center/ For a time, locals were suspicious. Strangers would visit the place, but they wouldn’t be seen leaving. Later, it was discovered that some of the people living in the house were school-aged children, but never enrolled in a nearby school. One of the leaders who had turned up for prayers at the nearby mosque found […]]]>

For a time, locals were suspicious. Strangers would visit the place, but they wouldn’t be seen leaving.

Later, it was discovered that some of the people living in the house were school-aged children, but never enrolled in a nearby school.

One of the leaders who had turned up for prayers at the nearby mosque found one of the miners who had been sent to buy items from a store.

When he asked the child why he was not studying, she reportedly said she was learning the Islamic faith at home. This triggered the information security leader.

“Residents have complained to me that some children are living inside Umar Kabonge’s house, but we are not going to school to study,” he said.

Following concerns from the zone chief, security cordoned off Kabonge’s house on February 19. The house is located in Kikubajinja Village, Piida Parish, Luwero City Council and Luwero District.

Kabonge was arrested along with Akbar Kabanda and an unidentified man. Several objects used in the manufacture of dangerous weapons have been recovered.

Items on display by security included electrical wires used to operate the mortars, boxes of welding machines, small bent mortars, keys and a silenced rifle with bullets.

Others were gunpowder, gun cleaning oil, a motorcycle, and Islamic learning materials, among others. Kabonge’s place of origin, according to security sources, remains a mystery.

His wife, Huthman Mariam, claims his family home is in nearby Nakaseke district, while other sources show he is from the West Nile sub-region and has relatives in Yumbe and Arua districts. , respectively.

“His second wife, Hadijjah Chandiru, resides in West Nile and he is visiting her,” a security source said.

“A few years ago, he lost one of his children, but he was taken to Tabliq sect limbo located in Nakkazi, Luwero district to be buried there, which means his home area is not in or near Luwero,” a security source added.

Kabonge’s official wife (Huthman Mariam) is from Ttikkalu-Kitanda and is the daughter of the late Gitta.

Inside the ADF installation

The house is near the main road. It is a humble house. But the bizarre thing that shocked the journalists during our visit was a tunnel dug in one of the rooms of Kabonge’s house.

The tunnel has a small entrance in the corner on the right side, accessible only by rope.

Even though the rooms in the house were not cemented, the inner part of the tunnel was cemented and frequently cleaned whenever training was conducted.

During the operation, security recovered a rifle that was used to train the miners. He had bullets.

Because it was a silenced gun, it was very difficult for anyone inside the house to know what was going on under the cave.

Inside the cave, the walls had bullet rooms indicating that during training trainees were allowed to shoot.

Meanwhile, one of the leaders who preferred anonymity said that although Kabonge’s house was close to a mosque, he could not allow his family members or neighbors to strike up a conversation. with them.

Defense spokesman Brig. General Felix Kulayigye said the facility was used by Allied Democratic Forces (ADF) operatives who were behind the two Kampala bombings last year at the central police station and on Parliamentary Avenue.

Arrest controversies

The region’s president said that when security arrested theirs (Umar Kakonge, alias Ajobe), on February 19, none of them were consulted.

“When the security agents chose him, they consulted one of the committee leaders from the nearby village of Mabanda, identified only as Nkalubo,” he noted.

He did, however, admit that during the second raid on Wednesday and Thursday, security agents hired four of their committee members, including Faith Kafunembi, Badru Kivumbi and Grace Lwanga, during the operation.

Luwero ADF installation linked to Katooke

Investigations further revealed that the ADF terrorist installation based in Luwero is linked to the Katooke terrorist group, led by Akbar Kabanda.

Piida parish councilor Lawrence Mwesige blamed security for quickly granting amnesty to Kabanda, but they knew he posed a great threat to the country.

“Imagine a person who was arrested last year in November, to benefit from an amnesty, knowing full well that he recruited and facilitated terrorist activities,” Mwesige said.

Kabanda’s story remains the most shocking with details revealing that he attended a prestigious university and was a successful businessman.

Those who saw his photo were shocked and wondered why a young man who was brilliant in school and had a bright future ended up in terrorism.

Although he uses Akbar Kabanda, his real name is Abdallah Moses, according to those who shared a class with him at Busoga College Mwiri. Abdallah alias Kabanda attended Mwiri for O’level and little is known about his education after Mwiri.

“When I joined Makerere University in 2004 he had a restaurant right next to Baskon Hostel and when I found out it was his I even convinced my classmates that we all took our meals at his restaurant.”So for a guy who was fine, I’m shocked by that,” noted another former school friend of Kabanda.

Some old boys don’t believe Kabanda is a terrorist. “How did the bright, soft-spoken, well-dressed and high-potential Abdallah Moses end up in this deep mess?” asked another person he knew.

What the leaders say

Kikubajinja local council chairman Fred Liggwa told New Vision that as leaders they know the suspect as Ajobe and not Kabonge.

Liggwa added that Kabonge had no criminal record in years that he had been in the area. One of Kabonge’s neighbors said he was shocked by the development because he knew Kabonge as a humble and hardworking man.

“I never noticed anything unusual about him. Maybe he’s good at hiding his stuff,” the neighbor said.

]]>
West Virginia Law Enforcement Receive Autism Training :: WRAL.com https://abilitiesnetworks.org/west-virginia-law-enforcement-receive-autism-training-wral-com/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 15:50:29 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/west-virginia-law-enforcement-receive-autism-training-wral-com/ By COURTNEY HESSLER, The Herald-Dispatch HUNTINGTON, W.Va. – A statewide program designed to teach law enforcement officers how to interact safely with people with autism spectrum disorder is being launched. Safe Interactions for Law Enforcement and Persons with Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities training was offered this month in Berkeley and Marion counties, through a partnership […]]]>

– A statewide program designed to teach law enforcement officers how to interact safely with people with autism spectrum disorder is being launched.

Safe Interactions for Law Enforcement and Persons with Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities training was offered this month in Berkeley and Marion counties, through a partnership with the Department of Health and Human Resources, University of Virginia -West and West Virginia State Police.

State Police Captain RA Maddy said the goal of the training was to reduce negative interactions and adverse outcomes by increasing awareness of intellectual or developmental disabilities, with an emphasis on autism spectrum disorders. Autism spectrum disorder is a developmental disorder with varying degrees of impairment creating atypical behaviors, patterns of interest, social interactions, and communications.

First Sergeant. State Police’s KG Murray said the training was essential for policing in the 21st century.

“As parents of a young adult and a teenager with ASD, my wife and I hope that the ASD awareness training will be a very effective educational tool for all law enforcement in West Virginia, where most of our encounters with people with ASD are positive,” he said. “With this training, West Virginia can be the light for the rest of the nation in ASD training and education for law enforcement and all first responders.”

In April 2021, the West Virginia Legislature passed a law that requires state law enforcement and corrections officers to undergo training to handle cases involving a person with autism spectrum disorder in which these people are victims or witnesses of a crime, or suspected or convicted. a crime. Autism awareness training within law enforcement began last year.

Julie O’Malley, community and educational training coordinator for Marshall University’s West Virginia Autism Training Center, said the first training under the law took place on June 28, 2021. O’Malley said that training for the academy was based on the academy script. autism-based training to show how the scenario might be different if someone with autism spectrum disorder was involved.

She said the training emphasizes the importance of being able to tell if someone is overwhelmed, on a sensory level, and understanding how officers can reduce this, such as through noise canceling headphones or fidgety toys. O’Malley said the first officers trained on the subject received a sensory bag containing some of these helpful items, but the grant funding it ran out.

She also said the training also stresses the importance of telling the person what the officer wants them to do, not what they shouldn’t do.

She said she started the practice with a video of a call in which a police officer approached an autistic person.

“It goes from nine seconds from the moment the police see it until they intervene,” she said. “If they can step back, really analyze the situation a little better, it’s a lot safer for everyone involved.”

Training is really about safety for everyone, including the community. That’s why community involvement and education are just as important, O’Malley said.

“If the person who called (the police) had just a little knowledge of autism,” she said, “through his key social cue, through his speech, the intonation of his speech, they really could have say and they wouldn’t even have had to call to put the police in this situation.

O’Malley said she’s encouraged to see communities like Hurricane host events where people with autism spectrum disorders can get to know first responders in a low-stimulation environment.

“Now is the time to do it, not when a 911 call has been made. This is not a teaching moment. I mean, everyone is in crisis,” she said. “You need to get those teachable moments before the crisis hits.”

O’Malley said he heard positive feedback about the formation of the academy. A mother of a child with autism spectrum disorder said one of the former cadets who completed the training later went to a similar community event.

“They get to know the families in their communities,” she says. “So, you know, they build relationships, so if they get a call and go to a house, the child or the adult will already be on their radar.”

The Safe Interactions training will last four hours and will be free for all active duty officers. Participants can receive four continuing education credits.

]]>
Non-profit foster home to host trauma care training https://abilitiesnetworks.org/non-profit-foster-home-to-host-trauma-care-training/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 03:18:32 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/non-profit-foster-home-to-host-trauma-care-training/ TEXARKANA — Local nonprofit foster care support organization For the Sake of One will host its second annual Trust-Based Relationship Intervention training camp next week. CRTI is an attachment-based, trauma-informed intervention designed to meet the complex needs of vulnerable children. TBRI uses empowerment principles to address physical needs, connection principles to attachment needs, and correction […]]]>

TEXARKANA — Local nonprofit foster care support organization For the Sake of One will host its second annual Trust-Based Relationship Intervention training camp next week.

CRTI is an attachment-based, trauma-informed intervention designed to meet the complex needs of vulnerable children. TBRI uses empowerment principles to address physical needs, connection principles to attachment needs, and correction principles to disarm fear-based behaviors.

This training is useful for anyone who works with children and especially for educators and parents, as trauma has affected every child through COVID-19, according to a press release. The training will give participants an overview of the principles of TBRI and provide information on the effects of trauma on the brain and how to help children recover from it.

For the Sake of One’s vision is a community where every child has a stable home and every family has the tools to thrive. Its mission is to “share God’s love with local children and families by providing emotional, physical and spiritual support while serving as a hub to connect, equip and empower all community stakeholders in the child protection”.

The group supports social workers, foster, adoptive and biological families and provides training at IRTC.

The training will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 20-23 at Heritage Church, 5801 N. Kings Highway on the Texas side. The cost is $20 for each day or $70 for all four days. Participants will receive six hours of training and lunch is included.

To register, go to eventbrite.com/e/tbri-summer-training-camp-tickets-347984078747 or visit forthesakeofone.com and click on the Events link.

All foster parents, adoptive parents and DHS caseworkers can attend the training for free and should email For the Sake of One for more information.

For the Sake of One encourages anyone interested in making a difference in the foster family community to contact them at 903-329-0566 or [email protected]

]]>
Training session for AR Nat. Guard youth program volunteers set for June 28 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/training-session-for-ar-nat-guard-youth-program-volunteers-set-for-june-28/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 05:02:52 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/training-session-for-ar-nat-guard-youth-program-volunteers-set-for-june-28/ A volunteer training for the Arkansas National Guard Child and Youth Program is scheduled for this month to add to the program’s bank of qualified volunteers in southern Arkansas. The Arkansas National Guard, made up of approximately 8,600 soldiers and airmen, is part of the United States military that answers to both the governor and […]]]>

A volunteer training for the Arkansas National Guard Child and Youth Program is scheduled for this month to add to the program’s bank of qualified volunteers in southern Arkansas.

The Arkansas National Guard, made up of approximately 8,600 soldiers and airmen, is part of the United States military that answers to both the governor and the president. The Children and Youth Program is one of the Branch’s many outreach efforts.

“Our program offers programs for military children, for school-aged youth from kindergarten through 12th grade,” explained James Garrett, coordinator of the children’s and teens’ program.

To volunteer with the program, one must attend a four-hour training session, and two are offered on June 28 for residents of southern Arkansas.

“We run day camps, retreats — a variety of educational programs for military kids,” Garrett said. “We go to different sites and recruit volunteers in different fields, so I can contact the volunteers we have trained.”

This month’s training sessions are open to everyone, including those who have not served in the US armed forces, Garrett said.

“A lot of our events (youth programs) are on exercise weekends when we’re doing military training, so we often need volunteers who are non-military civilians,” he said. .

Volunteers are encouraged to attend youth program events to facilitate educational and recreational activities for the children who attend. Garrett said kids whose parents are in the military often have had a different experience growing up than those whose parents aren’t, which training helps volunteers learn.

“One of the biggest differences I notice about military kids – sometimes they have to travel, or their parents are away for long periods of time, whether it’s in the state, helping out with a hurricane, or deploying to overseas, or, a lot of them have a long annual training,” Garrett said. “Having the parents away during this time is stressful, so the kids have to do things they’re not used to doing. They can grow a little faster, become a little more mature.”

Garrett said this month’s volunteer training sessions will require at least five people to sign up or they will be rescheduled. He said he hoped weekend or day camps could be planned in the area during the later part of this year once more volunteers were trained in the area.

“We want to have a STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, Math) day camp and do resilience training – a variety of educational activities,” he said.

Nine people at El Dorado have been trained to volunteer through the youth program, and Garrett said the Arkansas National Guard hopes to recruit more. There is no limit to the number of people who can attend training sessions this month.

Volunteers can also work with children outside of the region in which they live, Garrett said. Youth program coordinators will send information about upcoming youth program events to volunteers, who can sign up to help at camps and retreats statewide.

“They are more than welcome,” he said.

Two training sessions are scheduled for June 28 at the armory at 418 N. Calion Rd., one from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. and a second from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. To register, visit arngcyp_eldoradovtjun2022.eventbrite.com.

]]>
DVIDS – News – Virginia Soldier Offers Free Aviation Training to Deployed Military https://abilitiesnetworks.org/dvids-news-virginia-soldier-offers-free-aviation-training-to-deployed-military/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 06:39:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/dvids-news-virginia-soldier-offers-free-aviation-training-to-deployed-military/ CAMP BONDSTEEL, Kosovo — The cost of obtaining a pilot’s license can range between $4,000 and $15,000, depending on location, type of aircraft used, instructor experience and pace of flight. student learning. U.S. Army Sgt. Courtney Yerger knows all too well the financial difficulties that come with becoming a civilian aviator. A Virginia National Guard […]]]>

CAMP BONDSTEEL, Kosovo — The cost of obtaining a pilot’s license can range between $4,000 and $15,000, depending on location, type of aircraft used, instructor experience and pace of flight. student learning. U.S. Army Sgt. Courtney Yerger knows all too well the financial difficulties that come with becoming a civilian aviator.

A Virginia National Guard soldier, Yerger uses his civilian expertise to save soldiers hundreds of dollars by offering them a free aviation program during his downtime while deployed to Kosovo.

Currently based at Camp Bondsteel, Kosovo as a Geospatial Intelligence Imagery Analyst with the VaANG 116th Infantry Brigade Combat Team for NATO Kosovo Force, Yerger spends his Tuesdays evenings to help soldiers pursue their interests in the air force by offering a free program.

Concurrently, she is also applying to become an Army Warrant Officer, with aspirations of one day becoming the Virginia National Guard’s first female UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter flight instructor.

As a child, Yerger was always fascinated by the idea of ​​space. She was determined to get as close to space as possible by exploring the sky. To achieve his goal, his initial aspirations were to attend the United States Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado. But due to the demanding entry requirements, she was not accepted.

However, this did not cause Yerger to lose faith in her aviation dreams, as she was later accepted to Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia, where she attended aeronautical school.

“Having not studied aeronautics before, with no aviation background or training, I showed up and had no idea what was going on,” Yerger said. “But once I started doing it, I really enjoyed it and now I can’t see myself doing anything else.”

But her journey to becoming an aviator was not smooth and came with many challenges.

“In my second year, I had to drop out of college for financial reasons,” she said. “I left Liberty, came home, and ended up enlisting in the National Guard.”

After completing basic combat training, Yerger returned to Liberty University for her junior year. After graduating, she received a commercial pilot certificate and two flight instructor certificates.

However, Yerger then faced another familiar struggle – COVID-19, which left the aviation industry in dismay.

“I ended up graduating in 2020, the year of COVID, and I needed to find a job and accommodation quickly,” she said.

It was then that because of her qualifications, Liberty University offered Yerger a job as a flight instructor.

“The funny thing is growing up when people were like ‘what would you never want to do?’ I would say ‘be a teacher,’” she said with a laugh. “Because when I thought of being a teacher, I thought of being in front of a classroom and bringing homework to class.”

She accepted the job anyway and started teaching. To his surprise, the job was anything but traditional.

“I was like, ‘Oh! That’s a lot more fun than I thought,'” she said. I explained to them.”

Yerger said she likes to tailor her teaching method to the needs of each student.

“I love finding out how each student learns differently and adapting my teaching style to that,” she said. “It’s really rewarding.”

She explained that since deploying to Kosovo earlier this year, dozens of soldiers have asked her to host a class on an aviation ground course.

“When I had the meeting of interest to determine if this was actually something the soldiers would be interested in doing, about forty-three people showed up,” she said. “So I was like ‘Okay, there’s definitely an interest here. “”

Many Yerger students travel about an hour from other camps in Kosovo every Tuesday after the service day at Camp Bondsteel in order to attend his class.

U.S. Army 1st Lt. Benjamin Askins, a medical assistant assigned to Kentucky National Guard Headquarters and Central Company, 1st Battalion, 149th Infantry Regiment, travels from Camp Novo Selo, Kosovo, to attend each week.

“It was something on my bucket list for a while, but I never had the opportunity or the money to pursue it before,” Askins said. “When I found out there was an option to attend the course, combined with the free price, it was just perfect.”

One of the first requirements for obtaining a private pilot certificate is to be approved by a flight instructor and pass a knowledge test, which can cost up to $400 in the civilian sector, which Yerger offers free to her students, she said.

Soldiers who complete Yerger’s class in its entirety will receive his endorsement and will then be eligible to take the knowledge test.

“The goal of the class is that if they show up, do the work, and show me they’ve put in the effort, then I can endorse them,” she said. “Then they can take the test and go through those steps before they go to a flight school and start learning the flying part.”

Yerger’s class benefits not only the soldiers she teaches, but also her by keeping her up to date with her knowledge and preparing lessons.

“The students here keep me up to date with knowledge by asking questions and engaging,” she explained. “In many ways they teach me with their perspectives, their understandings and with what they bring to the table as well.”

Yerger said being an aviator means you never stop learning.

“There’s never a point of complacency,” she said. “Aviation is a profession where you continue to hone your skills.”

She hopes her knowledge and understanding of aviation regulations and standard operating procedures will give her an advantage when applying to become a warrant officer.

“If you’re in a fixed wing versus a helicopter, the aerodynamic principles don’t change,” Yerger said. “If my warrant officer file is accepted, I will go to flight school for Black Hawks.”

His goal is to follow the path of instructor pilot warrant officer, which could take up to two years if accepted.

“I know Virginia hasn’t had any female instructor pilots in the Guard yet, so that’s something I’d like to address,” she said. “But until then, I plan to return to training at Liberty after deployment.”

Her favorite part of being an aviator is no longer the amazing aerial views or controlling an airplane; it’s being a flight instructor and spending time with your students, whether in the air or on the ground, while helping them achieve their goals.







Date taken: 13.06.2022
Date posted: 13.06.2022 02:39
Story ID: 422763
Location: CAMP BONDSTEEL, ZZ





Web views: seven
Downloads: 0

PUBLIC DOMAIN

]]>
Free school meals: families “train” to eat so that their children do not go hungry https://abilitiesnetworks.org/free-school-meals-families-train-to-eat-so-that-their-children-do-not-go-hungry/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 11:46:25 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/free-school-meals-families-train-to-eat-so-that-their-children-do-not-go-hungry/ FAith Agnwet says she learned to “train her own way” of eating during the school holidays. By managing to eat less, she wants to ensure that her children – aged five and two – do not go hungry. And with summer vacation fast approaching, she worries. Her five-year-old son is entitled to free school meals […]]]>

FAith Agnwet says she learned to “train her own way” of eating during the school holidays. By managing to eat less, she wants to ensure that her children – aged five and two – do not go hungry.

And with summer vacation fast approaching, she worries.

Her five-year-old son is entitled to free school meals during school terms, like nearly 2 million other children in England.

Despite the cost of living crisis, the government has so far resisted calls to extend the scheme over the summer as it did in the first year of the Covid pandemic.

But for Agnwet, times are tough – and only getting worse. The single mother says she will “struggle” without any extra help to ensure her children are fed during the six-week holiday.

“It’s definitely something I’m thinking about: how am I going to keep them going?” she says.

Faith Agnwet says she’ll ‘struggle’ without extra help through the summer

(Provided)

While she would typically buy in bulk to cut costs during school holidays, she couldn’t afford to do so this year as supermarket prices soared.

“It’s gotten to the point where sometimes when I’m emptying the closet, I find things that I bought in bulk, and that’s what keeps me going,” the single parent from Southwark said. The Independent.

In west London, Aurora* are also worried about what this summer will bring.

The widowed parent says his children – aged seven and 13 – have been receiving free school meals for “as long as I can remember”.

And she says it would help if this support continued through the summer, given that the cost of living has risen so much.

“I calculated everything. I wouldn’t have the means to pay for school meals, ”says the forty-year-old who has just started a new job as a caregiver on a zero-hour contract. The Independent.

“Universal Credit is simply not good enough as is. My rent is really high. Because I live in London, we would really struggle.

Currently, children can access free food during school holidays through government-funded activity clubs, which typically operate for four weeks during the summer.

But Aurora says that’s not a viable option for her children, because of the cost of travel.

Around 495,000 children – less than a third of those who receive free school meals during school terms and are therefore eligible to attend – used these clubs during the summer holidays last year, official statistics show. .

“I was offered a summer club last year. But the fact is I would have had to pay £20 a week to go,” says Aurora, who lives in Ealing.

“Even though it was in my borough, it wasn’t within walking distance. My youngest’s school is already nearly two miles away.

In the first year of the Covid pandemic, vouchers were given out to families for free school meals over the summer, following a high-profile campaign led by footballer Marcus Rashford.

Tayyaba Siddiqui, whose primary school-aged son is receiving free school meals, says the same level of support is “absolutely needed” this year too. She now does without the £20-a-week Universal Credit boost, which was scrapped last autumn.

“Vouchers are useful. Because then you can choose what you want to buy,” says the NHS worker, who lives in north London.

“My son and I eat so many halal things,” she says, adding that it’s hard to find a food bank in her area that offers things they can eat; she does not want to have to throw away the given food.

The 46-year-old single parent says times are certainly tough right now.

Tayyaba Siddiqui, a 46-year-old NHS worker, says free school meal vouchers are ‘definitely’ needed this summer

(Provided)

“I count money,” she says. “As an adult, you can survive on less food. Although it will affect your work if you are tired, do not eat enough.

“But what about a child? It’s not his fault. I don’t want my child to know that we are going towards poverty.

Official government figures released this week show the number of children eligible for free school meals has now risen to 1.9million. This equates to 23% of the student population, up from 20.8% last year.

Former education secretaries and unions have called for the eligibility criteria for free school meals to be extended this year during the cost of living crisis, to all children whose families are on Universal Credit. Those who receive the allowance but earn more than £7,400 a year are currently not eligible to claim free school meals.

A government spokesman said it understood millions of people are struggling during the cost of living crisis and was providing an extra £15billion in recognition of this.

“We have also expanded access to free school meals more than any other government in decades, currently reaching more than 1.9 million eligible children,” they said.

“The holiday activity and food program runs during the major school holidays, and wider social support is available through the Household Support Fund, which helps vulnerable families in need with essentials, such as food and utility bills.”

*Aurora didn’t want to use her real name

]]>
Wisconsin DOJ Threat Assessment Training for School Personnel https://abilitiesnetworks.org/wisconsin-doj-threat-assessment-training-for-school-personnel/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 21:48:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/wisconsin-doj-threat-assessment-training-for-school-personnel/ WAUSAU, Wis. – Emily Perry was among the educators taking threat assessment training at Wausau West High School on Thursday. She is the Mental Health Coordinator for the Onalaska School District. Perry said the intent of the training was to prevent school violence before it happens. What do you want to know Educators from Wausau […]]]>

WAUSAU, Wis. – Emily Perry was among the educators taking threat assessment training at Wausau West High School on Thursday.

She is the Mental Health Coordinator for the Onalaska School District. Perry said the intent of the training was to prevent school violence before it happens.


What do you want to know

  • Educators from Wausau and other districts participated in threat identification training on Thursday
  • It is designed to help staff prevent violence before it happens to help students in need
  • The training is offered by the Office of School Safety of the Wisconsin Department of Justice

“Most of the time there are warning signs, things to look for,” she said. “Just being more aware, more present and more aware is going to help us be more preventative than reactive to situations.”

The training is provided by the Office of School Safety of the Wisconsin Department of Justice at the request of school districts in the state.

(Spectrum News 1/Nathan Phelps)

Perry said it was about getting help for students in need.

“It’s not just about identifying the threat, but also about escalating it to provide support to the child and the family,” she said.

Trish Kilpin, who heads the department’s Office of School Safety, said part of the training gives staff and others the confidence to get involved if anything goes out of the ordinary.

“One of the ways we know it’s effective in preventing violence is to have a community-based approach,” she said. “If parents, students and bystanders, or people who become aware that a child may behave in a way that suggests they might engage in violence, we need to know about it and they need to trust us. so that we can assess the information and develop an appropriate plan.”

(Spectrum News 1/Nathan Phelps)

School safety goes beyond things like locked doors and emergency plans; it also includes communication and outreach, said Caleb Bushman, director of student services for the Wausau School District.

“Our support staff, our teachers, the other students, they are on the front line. They see things day to day,” he said. “Do they trust? Do they have the knowledge to connect with someone who can help and support them? Take them to a school counselor, take them to a social worker, take them to someone who can investigate further to make sure we intervene before there is a disaster.

Perry said it ultimately comes down to providing student aid.

“We don’t want to look back and say, ‘We’re too late,” she said. “It’s always about being preventative and building their community.”

]]>
Two injured in residential fire in Suffolk (VA) https://abilitiesnetworks.org/two-injured-in-residential-fire-in-suffolk-va/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 21:41:35 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/two-injured-in-residential-fire-in-suffolk-va/ City of Suffolk (VA) Fire & Rescue responded to a blaze on Monday that left two injured and six displaced. The businesses responded to the 100 Block of Tournament Court for a reported residential structure on fire. Emergency communications sent the incident at 4:48 p.m. Engine 6, Ladder 6, Medic 6 and Safety 1 arrived […]]]>

City of Suffolk (VA) Fire & Rescue responded to a blaze on Monday that left two injured and six displaced.

The businesses responded to the 100 Block of Tournament Court for a reported residential structure on fire. Emergency communications sent the incident at 4:48 p.m.

Engine 6, Ladder 6, Medic 6 and Safety 1 arrived at 4:52 p.m. to find smoke coming from the front door of a single family residence. Two adult residents were outside when firefighters arrived. Both residents reported smoke inhalation and were treated by paramedics.

Crews launched an interior attack and search of the residence. The main fire potion was contained in the kitchen of the house, but there is smoke damage on the first floor of the house. The two adults were treated at the scene but refused to be transported to a local hospital. No injuries were reported by firefighters.

The fire is being investigated by the Office of the Fire Marshal, but the fire appears to be accidental. The American Red Cross has been contacted to assist the four displaced adults and one child.

The fire was brought under control by 5.06pm. Suffolk Police provided traffic control.

Responding units included Car1, Battalion 1, Battalion 5, Engine 6, Engine 4, Engine 1, Ladder 6, Rescue 1, Medic 6, Medic 1, EMS1, Safety 1, Fire Marshal 1, 3,7.

TOO

Suffolk (VA) firefighters respond to a two-alarm commercial fire

Suffolk (VA) firefighters control a smoky fire at an apartment complex

Suffolk (VA) firefighters respond to a commercial fire

Suffolk (VA) firefighters battle three-alarm fire; Two children rescued

]]>