Child training – Abilities Networks http://abilitiesnetworks.org/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 15:34:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-4.png Child training – Abilities Networks http://abilitiesnetworks.org/ 32 32 Video of Baltimore Cop Slapping Student Reignites Big Questions About Child Training for School Cops https://abilitiesnetworks.org/video-of-baltimore-cop-slapping-student-reignites-big-questions-about-child-training-for-school-cops/ https://abilitiesnetworks.org/video-of-baltimore-cop-slapping-student-reignites-big-questions-about-child-training-for-school-cops/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 15:34:17 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/?p=22 March 2016: A police officer slaps and kicks a young black man outside a Baltimore high school, sparking a criminal investigation and cries for federal authorities to intervene. October 2015: A high school girl who refuses to follow school rules is body-slammed to the ground, ripped from her chair, and thrown past rows of desks. […]]]>

March 2016: A police officer slaps and kicks a young black man outside a Baltimore high school, sparking a criminal investigation and cries for federal authorities to intervene.

October 2015: A high school girl who refuses to follow school rules is body-slammed to the ground, ripped from her chair, and thrown past rows of desks. The school resource officer’s use of force, caught on video, unleashes national outrage and costs him his job.

November 2014: An 8-year-old boy is cuffed above the elbows as a cell phone captures the scuffle. “You can do what we ask you to or you can suffer the consequences,” the school resource officer says to the boy in a video that prompted a lawsuit over his use of restraint.

September 2015: In Irving, Texas, a boy who shows a clock to his science teacher, proud of his ingenuity, finds himself in handcuffs — accused of building a “hoax bomb.”

October 2015: Some 180 miles south in Round Rock, an SRO called to stop a gym fight chokes a 14-year-old boy to the floor.  The police officer “should have been trained well enough to know that this is a 130-pound child,” the boy’s father tells a local TV station. “The action that was taken was totally unnecessary.”

There are about 19,000 sworn police officers stationed in schools nationwide, according to U.S. Department of Justice estimates, and stories about their school discipline disasters cross Mo Canady’s desk all the time.

“The first thing I do is search our database to see ‘Did this person come through our training?’” said Canady, executive director of the National Association of School Resource Officers, which offers specialized training to SROs — primarily on a voluntary basis. “And the answer is consistently ‘no.’”

These incidents, youth rights activists and federal officials argue, show that the school resource officers lack the proper training needed to interact effectively with children, especially when they are black, Hispanic, or disabled. The very students, advocates say, are being funneled from the classroom to the courtroom.

“In terms of dealing with students of color, one thing that is super important and one thing we asked (officials) to do is to have training that allows people to understand the unconscious biases for their behavior,” said Morgan Craven, director of the School-to-Prison Pipeline Project at Texas Appleseed. “It can be uncomfortable for people to say ‘I am biased against people with color,’ but a majority of people in this country, and a majority of teachers, have those biases.”

Attempts to crack down on school violence have come at the expense of students of color and those with disabilities, who are disproportionately punished — including through restraint and arrest, U.S. Department of Education data show.

The U.S. Department of Justice is already investigating the Baltimore Police Department after Freddie Gray died from a spinal injury while in police custody in April 2015.
Nationally, black students were 16 percent of the total student enrollment in the 2011-12 school year but 27 percent of students referred to law enforcement and 31 percent of students involved in a school-related arrest, according to U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights data.
Students with disabilities represented about 12 percent of the total student population but accounted for a quarter of those arrested and referred to law enforcement, 75 percent of those who were physically restrained at school and 58 percent of those placed in seclusion or involuntary confinement. (The 74: Mississippi’s Horrifying Trend of Punishing Students Through Restraint Could Be Coming to an End)
A range of factors may cause variations in student discipline rates, but research suggests racial disparities are not caused by more misbehavior, but because “racial discrimination in school discipline is a real problem.”

Assigned to schools, but not trained on students

Little data has been collected on the level of training officers receive. Only 12 states have laws that specify training requirements for officers deployed to classrooms, and those laws are inconsistent: Some states mandate training on how to respond to an active shooter. Fewer focus on dealing with children differently than adults.

“All officers are getting a certain level of training that they’re required to get as police officers,” said Nina Salomon, a senior policy analyst at the Council of State Governments Justice Center. “The additional training that we’re talking about — on youth development, on working with youth, on prevention and de-escalation — hasn’t typically been received by the majority of law enforcement that work with youth inside a school building, or that are called to campus.”



Susan Mizner, disability counsel for the ACLU, said three levels of training could have helped prevent situations like the one in Kentucky where an 8-year-old boy ended up  crying and squirming in a chair as the school resource officer demands obedience — handcuffing him above the elbows because the cuffs were too large for his wrists.

“It’s your decision to behave this way,” the officer is heard saying on the video as the boy complains of pain. “If you want the handcuffs off, you’re going to have to behave and ask me nicely.”

First, Mizner said, school staff and officers should know the SRO’s job is to keep schools safe from a threat, not to engage in routine discipline.

“We can’t have that line blurred,” she said. “Just because they’re there doesn’t mean we use them. That’s the first level of training, and that’s probably the hardest piece of training for both school staff and school resource officers.”

But when an officer does become involved, Mizner said, training in de-escalation techniques is the second step. That includes diversion, not direct commands for compliance. And third: training to help recognize students with disabilities.  

“School resource officers should understand and expect that they will be called in, primarily, to interact with kids with disabilities because our school systems really haven’t learned how to accommodate those disabilities and to work productively with most of these kids,” she said, adding that in order to hold authorities accountable for this level of training, it should be required.

“There should be laws that they have, at a minimum, those three types of trainings and policies that go with them,” she said. “Many more kids are hurt and traumatized by this than caught in fires in schools each year, so I see it as essential.”

In October 2015, the U.S.  Justice Department issued a Statement of Interest in the Kentucky case, highlighting the need for SROs to be properly trained “to recognize and respond appropriately to youth behavior that may be a manifestation of disability.”

“Appropriate training can help law enforcement agencies avoid interactions that violate children’s rights under federal civil rights laws, including the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act),” according to the statement.

The adolescent brain

Andre Hill, a police lieutenant in Richmond, California, offers school-specific SRO training through Strategies for Youth, a national organization devoted to improving interactions between police and young people.

Officers are taught about the brain structure and capacity of youth during their adolescence and young adulthood — information that promotes positive interactions and lessens conflict.

“That cuffing technique alone, we would never teach that,”  Hill said, referring to the Kentucky incident.

Before he was asked to lead the department’s youth services division, Hill said he didn’t realize the effect officers can have on kids’ lives. He does now.

“Especially in urban schools, kids are hard to reach,” he said. “If they’re not getting structure at home, they are going to continue to act out, even when confronted by an authority figure.”

New policies in Colorado are often touted as a progressive approach. A 2012 revision in the state’s education statute set minimum requirements for SROs, so the Colorado Peace Officer Standards and Training Board developed an SRO curriculum. Before then, some departments offered extensive specialized training, others relied on a 90-minute video describing some of the problems they could encounter on the job. Some departments didn’t even do that.

Survey results from a 2012 study show most police academies do not teach recruits about research on adolescent psychology and behavior.

In 37 states, police academies spent 1 percent or less of total training hours on juvenile justice issues, according to the study by Strategies for Youth. And while most academies do not teach recruits how to respond to children with mental health, trauma-related and special education-related disorders, only one state — Tennessee — provides specific training for officers deployed to schools. In five states, police academies do not require any training focused specifically on juvenile justice issues.

Once on the job, about 80 percent of police officers said they receive department-level training in juvenile justice issues, according to an International Association of Chiefs of

Police survey, and almost 75 percent said they receive training through state-level agencies. However, most officers said they receive fewer than 10 hours of juvenile justice interview and interrogation training over their entire careers.

Hill is in the process of developing a training model to present to other officers in his  California department. For him, training is important, he said, because “we don’t want to find ourselves in front of a judge being asked what kind of training is necessary.”

Finding the money

Last year, residents in Columbia, South Carolina approached Strategies for Youth’s founder and executive director, Lisa Thurau, with their concerns about the Richland County Sheriff’s Department — the same department whose deputy, Ben Fields, was caught on video violently handling the teenage girl who refused to leave her classroom or put away her cell phone.  

Community members had heard horror stories about officers’ use of force, arrests, and suspensions in their schools, Thurau said. They asked for her help.

Strategies for Youth gave the residents a set of training recommendations, which they delivered to the sheriff’s department. Recommendations included the nonprofit organization’s five-day train-the-trainer program, which uses a police training coach and a psychologist to teach officers how to train their co-workers. They also recommended a second, three-day session.

The training would have cost the department $75,000, according to the proposal. Thurau said she provided a list of organizations that could help pay for the program but communication between the community members and the sheriff’s department fell flat.

“We encounter this in a lot of places. There is no money,” she said. “We’re increasing the demands on police and doing nothing to support or equip them to be first responders to youth and families’ needs.”

The conduct of Fields, the Spring Valley High School SRO, horrified many and prompted a criminal civil rights probe by the Federal Bureau of Investigations and the Justice Department.

Fields “did not follow proper training, did not follow proper procedure when he threw the student across the room,” Richland County Sheriff Leon Lott said at a news conference announcing Fields had been fired.

In this case, school officials made the first mistake when they called on a police officer to address a school discipline incident, said Dennis Parker, director of the ACLU Racial Justice Program. But once the officer was there, he should have known how to de-escalate the situation without the use of force.

“It would be good to have clear training requirements for all schools and a clear understanding of what the role of school resource officers in schools should be,” Parker said. “I think that should be part of an agreement that is entered into between the school resource officers and the school district.”

Under South Carolina law, police officers must complete basic training as provided or recognized by the National Association of School Resource Officers or the South Carolina Criminal Justice Academy before they’re placed in schools.

But Canady, the NASRO executive director, said SROs in South Carolina, including Fields, don’t take his training because his program wasn’t approved by a state regulatory commission that certifies SRO training programs in the state.

According to the Strategies for Youth survey, state police academy recruits receive 3.5 hours of training on juvenile justice issues. This does not include training on youth development and psychology, demographic issues, or cultural influences.

Training a matter of ‘common sense’

The Justice Center doesn’t see police stepping away from schools any time soon, Salomon, the senior policy analyst, said. So in 2014, the center released more than 60 policy recommendations to help ensure students are in productive classrooms, not courtrooms.

Several training requirements were recommended, starting with knowledge of the school’s code of conduct so school officials and police are on the same page. The Justice Center administered the report in coordination with the Supportive School Discipline Initiative launched in 2011 by the U.S. Attorney General and the U.S. Secretary of Education. More than 100 advisers including policymakers, school administrators, teachers, behavioral health experts, and police collaborated on the recommendations.

“We don’t take a position on whether law enforcement should be in school or not,” Salomon said. “But if they are going to be in school, as is the case in a lot of jurisdictions around the country, then they need to have the right training, resources and support to be able to do their job well.”

Most members of the National Association of School Resource Officers, which does not cover every cop who works in a school, receive at least some training beyond what is required by police academies or school orientation, according to a Justice Center survey.

Training covers a variety of scenarios, including investigation protocols, active shooters, conflict resolution, addressing trauma, and working with school administrators. Some said they were trained on bullying and suicide prevention.

Canady, the NASRO executive director, gets frustrated when people say there isn’t any training available for school-based police officers. His organization has trained school resource officers for more than two decades — but “we only train the ones that come to us.”

NASRO, the largest provider of school-based training, instructs about 1,500 officers each year, Canady said. His program teaches officers concepts in law enforcement, and in teaching and informal counseling.

“The SROs should become as if they’re a member of the school team, and certainly another trusted adult in the building that certainly is there to protect students, but certainly also to be aware of any criminal issues going on in the schools,” Canady said. “They serve a lot of different roles, especially if they’re doing the job the proper way.”

In the 1990s, Kristen Amundson served as chairwoman of the Fairfax County, Va., school board, where she supported the growth of resource officers in her schools. Now as executive director of the National Association of State Boards of Education, she still does.

If school police are properly trained and employ community-based policing techniques, Amundson said their presence can be a “gamechanger” in maintaining a positive school culture. The officers’ presence helped steer her schools away from criminal activity.

“We never had metal detectors at the doors, we never had to move football games from night to afternoon because it was just a culture of safety, and the SRO was there to be part of it,” she said.

However, since school-based police are usually recruited from law enforcement, according to a Justice Policy Institute report, even officers trained by NASRO typically have years of law enforcement training and only three days of training in counseling and education.

Los Angeles Police Department Detective Richard Askew said his time as an educator and as an SRO influenced his understanding of the way children behave and interact with authority.

Before joining the LAPD, Askew worked for two years at a charter school serving at-risk students aged 16-24 who were unable to stay engaged with traditional or alternative methods. Joining LAPD’s juvenile narcotics division, Askew was planted in L.A. schools as an undercover investigator.

In 2009, he joined LAPD’s mental evaluation unit, a partnership with the department of mental health to interact with people who struggle from mental health issues. He also became a Strategies for Youth trainer.

“SROs generally have a pretty big impact on campuses for students because of their authority positions and how they’re perceived,” Askew said.

Once an officer is selected as an SRO, they receive in-house training on school district policies and procedures and 40 hours of SRO training from the state police academy, he said. Just a few months ago, all of the department’s officers were taught how to avoid implicit bias.

California does have a law setting training requirements for SROs. But until standardized training is required, most of the officers who do seek additional coursework are acting out of common sense, Canady said. Police departments would ensure officers in investigations units are properly trained.

So why not those who work in schools?

“Officers working in schools, just out of the nature of the assignment, are going to become the most well-known police officers or sheriff’s deputies in your community, and you’d better have some additional training for them, and you’d better make sure it’s the right person,” Canady said, “or you’re going to wind up potentially giving your department a black eye.”


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Inside Tyson Fury’s chaotic training camp for the Deontay Wilder trilogy, from battle of newborn intensive care to Covid cases https://abilitiesnetworks.org/inside-tyson-furys-chaotic-training-camp-for-the-deontay-wilder-trilogy-from-battle-of-newborn-intensive-care-to-covid-cases/ https://abilitiesnetworks.org/inside-tyson-furys-chaotic-training-camp-for-the-deontay-wilder-trilogy-from-battle-of-newborn-intensive-care-to-covid-cases/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 10:40:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/inside-tyson-furys-chaotic-training-camp-for-the-deontay-wilder-trilogy-from-battle-of-newborn-intensive-care-to-covid-cases/ TYSON FURY is just hours away from fighting Deontay Wilder for the third time. And the Gypsy King’s journey to the blockbuster trilogy has been far from straightforward. 9 Tyson Fury is hours away from his trilogy fight against Deontay Wilder – but the build-up hasn’t been easyCredit: Rex Fury is the bookmaker’s favorite to […]]]>

TYSON FURY is just hours away from fighting Deontay Wilder for the third time.

And the Gypsy King’s journey to the blockbuster trilogy has been far from straightforward.

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Tyson Fury is hours away from his trilogy fight against Deontay Wilder – but the build-up hasn’t been easyCredit: Rex

Fury is the bookmaker’s favorite to successfully defend his WBC heavyweight title against the man he sensationally snatched the belt from.

In February 2020, Morecambe’s mauler beat Wilder in a seventh round stoppage – a demanding revenge for the first fight draw that many believed Fury should have won.

And so the two will be doing it for the third time in Las Vegas.

Rival promoter Eddie Hearn, still angry after his man Anthony Joshua lost all his belts to Oleksandr Usyk, believes Fury is “not ready” for the fight.

And the 33-year-old’s preparation has indeed not been as smooth as it could have been.

Here, SunSport goes over some of the issues that played a role in Fury’s fight camp.

CLICK HERE FOR LIVE UPDATES FROM FURY VS WILDER 3

SPECIAL BET: GET 30/1 ON FURY OR 50/1 ON WILDER FOR HEAVY BOXING Clash

Contracting the coronavirus

Fury tested positive for the coronavirus in July, which ended the trilogy taking place this month.

A new October 9 date has been agreed – but Wilder seems to think Team Fury ‘lied’ that Gypsy King contracted the virus.

He told the PBC podcast: “They’re trying to run away from him, I’m rushing. I don’t believe he had Covid.”

Fury's workout routine was severely disrupted after catching coronavirus

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Fury’s workout routine was severely disrupted after catching coronavirusCredit: Instagram / @ gypsyking101
Several members of Team Fury, including the man himself, have contracted coronavirus

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Several members of Team Fury, including the man himself, have contracted coronavirusCredit: Instagram / @joeboxerparker

But Fury lambasted the American and said he contracted Covid-19 TWICE and felt “weak” and “terrible”.

He said: “I have had Covid twice. I’ve had it once in 2020 and once a few months ago.

“The first time was a lot harder because I lost my sense of smell and my taste, and I felt weak and I felt terrible. The second time around, I didn’t feel so bad. “

Bedside vigil for newborns

Tyson and Paris’s sixth child, Athena, was rushed straight to intensive care after being born on August 8.

Concerned parents were with their daughter around the clock as she was treated in intensive care.

And much to the Gypsy King’s delight, Athena was freed and was finally able to go home.

The champion boxer shared updates on how her new baby Athena was doing as she was taken to intensive care shortly after birth

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The champion boxer shared updates on how her new baby Athena was doing as she was taken to intensive care shortly after birthCredit: Instagram @ gypsyking101

The boxing champion has kept his fans updated on Athena’s progress throughout the worrying period on social media.

But the ordeal has taken its toll on the WBC heavyweight champion, who will return to the ring for the first time in 20 months on October 9.

Speaking to ITV, he said: “[It] probably took a few years out of my life, the amount of stress I was under. “

Fury asked fans to donate to help the children's hospital caring for his baby girl

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Fury asked fans to donate to help the children’s hospital caring for his baby girlCredit: Instagram / @ gypsyking101

Separate from the steward

Fury teamed up with the legendary SugarHill Steward before defeating Wilder in 2020.

But his training with the American did not go as well as he might have hoped.

Fury credits SugarHill Steward for returning to the top of the sport

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Fury credits SugarHill Steward for returning to the top of the sportCredit: Instagram
Fury has been with SugarHill Steward - but may not have done the amount of boxing training he hoped for

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Fury has been with SugarHill Steward – but may not have done the amount of boxing training he hoped for

The BBC reports that Steward was only able to join him two weeks before he returned to the United States.

And he adds that “Fury’s camp was severely disrupted during construction.

Chaotic press conference

The pair’s first press conference in June was odd – Fury did his best to provoke Wilder but the American had the perfect way to avoid the noise.

The fallen champion sat there for the entire duration with his headphones on – even keeping them glued to his ears when the two came face to face.

But the last presser before the scrap was very different. Fury circled the stage with the microphone, while Wilder sat down and returned it.

Fury was the center of attention during the final press conference - but his promoter nearly stole the show

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Fury was the center of attention during the final press conference – but his promoter nearly stole the showCredit: La Méga Agence

Chaos ensued when presenter Kate Abdo appeared to signal the traditional “tête-à-tête” – but Fury promoter Bob Arum went ballistic and canceled it.

He says that by doing this he “saved the fight” – then he launched a crass tirade against the 40-year-old British TV presenter.

ESPN’s Mike Coppinger also received the two barrels of Arum, with the 89-year-old telling him to “shut the fuck up, fuck”.

How Tyson Fury and Deontay Wilder rank ahead of the trilogy fight

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How Tyson Fury and Deontay Wilder rank ahead of the trilogy fight
Tyson Fury says he would have fucked up the ass if the face-to-face with Deontay Wilder had happened at the last press conference


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The Confused and Confused Messages of Quiverfull Childhood Education https://abilitiesnetworks.org/the-confused-and-confused-messages-of-quiverfull-childhood-education/ https://abilitiesnetworks.org/the-confused-and-confused-messages-of-quiverfull-childhood-education/#respond Thu, 10 Sep 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/the-confused-and-confused-messages-of-quiverfull-childhood-education/ Michael and Debi Pearl’s No Greater Joy magazine has another new writer, one who seems inclined to use hyperbole and lots of words with all caps to make a POINT! Her name is Sharee Moore, and her one post is all about encouraging the boys in your life to be adventurers. I always LISTEN when […]]]>

Michael and Debi Pearl’s No Greater Joy magazine has another new writer, one who seems inclined to use hyperbole and lots of words with all caps to make a POINT! Her name is Sharee Moore, and her one post is all about encouraging the boys in your life to be adventurers.

I always LISTEN when my boys are playing together, but I don’t always watch. This mom gene can come into play and I’ll find myself correcting or interrupting their play because it doesn’t seem ‘safe’. My heart loves to run, jostle in my chest and jump off the ledge every time they do! Despite this, I know that boys need the freedom to do “dangerous” and daring things! God put something in a man that makes him want to do things that I will later call BRAVE. I’m sure that getting high, nagging, and pampering are three of the worst things I can do for a male child. Their future wives will NOT thank me for raising adult boys. I teach them to be confident by encouraging the adventurer in them. Boys learn by DOING. I teach them responsibility and accountability by GIVING them responsibility, and I TRY not to tolerate weak excuses. True speech: in their eternal desire to “be right”, men learn to speak in circles from childhood. MDR! Don’t have ANYTHING, sister! I do my best to encourage honesty and open communication.

Translation: She lets them do things that would horrify most people outside of her little cult circle, playing with knives or dangerous equipment they’re far too young for! It’s just easier than trying to uplift them and keep tabs on their activities, I guess.

I teach them respect and gallantry by reminding them to practice being men with me and their sister. I try SO MUCH to let their father influence the boys without me inserting myself because I know that children need their father to grow up. I fail A LOT. There are still areas where I have more to learn on how to LISTEN but not watch.

She doesn’t seem to realize as a mother that it’s her job to protect them, even from themselves. Children left alone, even girls, can stray into rather dangerous situations and places that they don’t have to be.

Next, we zoom into an ongoing conversation in the chat room of the one we’re trying not to name because of her narcissistic tendencies. It’s heartbreaking advice for beating kids because they’re uncomfortable around new people.

Jesus cried! A world where juggling knives and playing with power tools will only be boys will be boys, but being a toddler who feels insecure, unsafe, and uncomfortable with others is a beatable offense? The sad thing is that if you take away the advice to use personal physical violence against a small child, a child with imperfect control, for whom the world seems to be a very scary place, the advice is not bad. .

Find out why the child views the other person so negatively. Is there a real reason, like with Grandpa making weird faces, seeming too foreign or strange? Maybe the kid is having a bad day, needs a nap, a snack, or a few things. You can insist that the child be polite to others, but you cannot force him to like certain people. That just doesn’t have to be the original poster’s big deal.

But what do we expect from a place run by a woman who thinks enough hitting will keep people from becoming Black Lives Matter protesters as adults?

It’s not cool to call a child a ‘kid’

~~~~~~~~~

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How to improve children’s working memory: train children’s brains https://abilitiesnetworks.org/how-to-improve-childrens-working-memory-train-childrens-brains/ https://abilitiesnetworks.org/how-to-improve-childrens-working-memory-train-childrens-brains/#respond Thu, 13 Apr 2017 09:10:54 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/how-to-improve-childrens-working-memory-train-childrens-brains/ Working memory is the ability to keep information in mind while performing complex tasks. A young child is able to perform simple tasks – sharpen a pencil when asked – while a middle school student can remember the expectations of many teachers. Since students with attention deficit disorder (ADD or ADD) and learning disabilities often […]]]>

Working memory is the ability to keep information in mind while performing complex tasks. A young child is able to perform simple tasks – sharpen a pencil when asked – while a middle school student can remember the expectations of many teachers.

Since students with attention deficit disorder (ADD or ADD) and learning disabilities often have short-term memory problems, it is important to reduce the amount of routine information they need to learn. memory. Keeping their memory free for the key part of the task ahead is essential.

Parents and teachers can help students with ADHD develop strategies to remember more and, more importantly, to regularly use the strategies they have developed.

How to improve working memory in children at school

Write homework. Write each assignment on the board in the same place each day, so students know where to find it. Children with ADHD may not listen or pay attention when you give them oral instructions – and you can’t rely on them to always remember the instructions.

Make checklists. One way to reduce thesis demands is to provide your class with a list of the steps required to complete an assignment. Instructions should be brief.

[Take This Test: Does Your Child Have a Working Memory Deficit?]

Find out what they heard. Have students with poor working memory repeat the homework instructions and clarify any parts they may have forgotten.

Allow time at the end of class for students to write homework in their assignment books. Make sure children with ADHD do what you tell them to. Fun visual reminders can also help. For an essay, for example, have each student trace their hand on a piece of paper, then write the name of part of the essay on each finger: thesis statement, topic sentences for the first one, the second and third paragraph, and conclusion.

Make eye contact with a child before giving him an assignment in class.

Maintain homework on the school website. Parents of children with ADHD depend on this information to make sure their children know what to do.

Speak slowly and provide information in small units. With too much information at once, a child with poor working memory quickly loses track. She may still work for the first few minutes of the lesson after you move on.

[Click to Download: 11 Tips for Redirecting Focus]

Make the lectures interactive. To help children with low working memory remember something important, structure the lesson to include their answers. For example, when you are teaching a math lesson, you can encourage students to volunteer to share what they have learned about fractions, division, or any other topic that day. Repeating a key point will help anchor it in their memories.

Use wild and wacky strategies. Presenting information in a typical way may not grab a student’s attention, but a curved ball can help grab it for better remembering later.

Use brain breaks or movements and get some exercise. Exercise increases blood flow to the brain and helps students think more clearly. So, rather than asking students to raise their hands to respond, you can ask them to do show jumps near their chairs. You can also encourage movement by letting the children walk to the water cooler for a break.

Have a routine for handing in homework. Some teachers ask students to place their completed work on their desks as soon as they sit down for class, then check off in their notebooks that homework has been done. Another idea: to make the homework presentation the “class exit ticket” at the end of the day. Stand by the door and pick it up as the students leave. As you can imagine, children will comply when the alternative is to stay in school one more minute.

Discuss with the students what to do if they forget something. Assign – or ask students to choose – a study buddy they can talk to if they have forgotten what they are supposed to do for their homework or if they cannot remember what they are supposed to do for their homework. class.

Use an analog clock during lessons to help your students manage their time. They will be able to keep track of how much time has passed and what is left.

Draw attention to due dates and key concepts. Post them, check them frequently, and remind parents and students of them in home notes, newsletters, or school voicemail. For essential themes provided during teaching, use clues such as “This is important! It also helps to frame important information with numbers, for example “Remember 5 things”.

Have students design their own “tickler systems” – ways to remember things to remember (license, money for lunch, sports clothes). This could lead to a class discussion, to give students the opportunity to share the strategies that work for them.

How to improve working memory at home

Assign a designated place for your child to put important things – house keys, wallet, sports equipment. As soon as he comes home from school, make sure he puts these things in their place. A reward for following – or a penalty for not – will strengthen the habit of staying organized.

Create a reminder checklist to make sure your child has everything they need to bring to school. At first, watch her go through the checklist to make sure she puts each item in her backpack. Don’t repeat what’s on the list, but ask him to tell you (this helps transfer information from your working memory to his). Have your child use the checklist when he finished his homework the night before, to avoid rushing in the morning.

Create and use task lists yourself, so your child understands that this is a lifelong coping strategy. Life is too complicated to expect children to memorize everything!

Brainstorm with your child how they can remember important things. Can he write it on the back of his hand, program his smartphone to remind him of it, ask friends with better memories to invite him?

Homework routines to improve working memory

Get permission from teachers for your child to email homework. It’s easy for kids doing homework on the computer. Some families scan homework on a scanner and email it to the teacher. This tip will not strengthen working memory, but it is a good coping strategy for students with weak executive functions.

Reward your child for remembering this. Email teachers once a week to make sure all homework has been handed in. Give your child five points for all completed homework, four points for a single missed assignment, and zero points for more than one missing. Create a menu of rewards that the child can earn. Award more points for more complex missions.

Give your child a homework routine to follow. Homework is a complex series of sub-tasks that must be completed in sequential order. It requires a lot of working memory. Teach your child that to complete an assignment he must:

  • Know what the mission is
  • Bring the necessary equipment home
  • Put homework back in your binder or backpack
  • Bring completed homework to school.

Morning routines to improve working memory

Have your child record the steps in their morning routine. Listening to his own voice while reading creates less tension than nagging him about what to do. If he forgets a step, he can just rewind the tape to figure out what he missed.

Rehearse with your child what you expect them to remember just before the situation. For example, if he needs to ask the teacher for a study guide or individual help, prepare him by asking, “So what do you need to say to your teacher when you go upstairs? desk ? “

Use digital reminders. With kids in middle school, use cell phones, text messages, or instant messages to remind them of things to do.

Minimize external distractions – turn off the television or turn down the volume if you want your child to pay full attention when you say something important.

Follow through. Kids with poor working memory will say they’ve done something – put homework in their backpack, say – when you ask, but they’ll forget. Until the child gets used to taking action when prompted, check them to make sure they’ve done what they told you.

[Get This Free Download: 10 Solutions for Disorganization at School]

Updated July 26, 2021

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ISIL children’s training camp discovered in Istanbul: report https://abilitiesnetworks.org/isil-childrens-training-camp-discovered-in-istanbul-report/ https://abilitiesnetworks.org/isil-childrens-training-camp-discovered-in-istanbul-report/#respond Mon, 19 Oct 2015 07:00:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/isil-childrens-training-camp-discovered-in-istanbul-report/ ISTANBUL A total of 24 of the 50 suspects of Tajik and Uzbek origin, who were arrested for having links with the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIS) in Istanbul on October 18, were found to be children trained in apartments in the basement. in the Pendik and Başakşehir districts of Istanbul, the […]]]>
ISTANBUL

A total of 24 of the 50 suspects of Tajik and Uzbek origin, who were arrested for having links with the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIS) in Istanbul on October 18, were found to be children trained in apartments in the basement. in the Pendik and Başakşehir districts of Istanbul, the Vatan daily reported.

The suspects allegedly trained children in basement apartments in Pendik and Başakşehir, using the apartments as militant training camps, according to physical and technical surveillance gathered by agents of the Counterterrorism Unit of the Istanbul Police Department before raiding 18 separate houses in Pendik and Başakşehir in the Kayaşehir district of Başakşehir.

The suspects, mostly Uzbeks, who were arrested in the October 18 raids reportedly taught children the basics of ISIS as well as how to live in an Islamic state.

In August, the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan, an offshoot of Al Qaeda based near the Afghan border, announced its allegiance to ISIS.

Uzbek intelligence sources reported that more than 5,000 paid Uzbek militants were fighting in Syria alongside ISIS.

Turkey has stepped up counterterrorism police operations against ISIL militants in the country, as the October 10 double explosions in the Turkish capital sent shockwaves across the country, leaving at least 102 civilians dead and hundreds more injured.

Thirteen ISIS-linked suspects have reportedly been detained so far as part of the investigation into the Ankara bombing.


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