Child teaching – Abilities Networks http://abilitiesnetworks.org/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 16:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-4.png Child teaching – Abilities Networks http://abilitiesnetworks.org/ 32 32 Dr. Andrew Smolar: Teaching kids to cope in the world of social media https://abilitiesnetworks.org/dr-andrew-smolar-teaching-kids-to-cope-in-the-world-of-social-media/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/dr-andrew-smolar-teaching-kids-to-cope-in-the-world-of-social-media/ I was a student for 32 years. This time was spent in silent classrooms, laboratories, hospitals and offices. Countless hours spent learning the language of medicine and the mysteries of the mind. Such was the journey of a psychiatrist who became a psychoanalyst. But I was not introduced to psychology until my second year of […]]]>

I was a student for 32 years. This time was spent in silent classrooms, laboratories, hospitals and offices. Countless hours spent learning the language of medicine and the mysteries of the mind. Such was the journey of a psychiatrist who became a psychoanalyst. But I was not introduced to psychology until my second year of medicine, 19 years after the start of my studies.

I had not been taught about child psychological development before. Not where feelings come from, and how they lead to thoughts. Or how difficulties in communicating feelings lead to relationship problems. I was not taught the commitment between baby and mother, and how this pattern affects later relationships. I have not been taught how a child feels in conflict between his desires and his fears. And I was not taught how a child’s development is derailed by trauma, ranging from severe punishment by parents to death or abandonment by one of them.

Amazingly, I was not taught the science of learning. Why some children struggle with the traditional approach. What variables make it easier or harder. How feelings of social acceptance affect the ability to learn. We were also not taught to question the sources we relied on for facts – mostly textbooks. It wasn’t until college that I was encouraged to think critically about the sometimes unconscious author’s point of view. How the narrator tells the story, what is omitted or emphasized, shapes the reader’s picture of the story. It turns out that the subject of bias is vital.

I also didn’t learn group behavior. Even though there were groups around me – cliques of kids taunting or bullying other kids – no one explained how a nice boy could turn mean when he was in a hostile crowd. The role of group membership in consolidating personal identity, group contagion, and causes of group regression have never been on the agenda.

Fast forward a generation. Our children graduated from public school in our hometown five years ago. The schools are considered excellent; they are equipped with state-of-the-art technology and led by average to excellent faculty. Unless a child is an unorthodox learner who has not been diagnosed, they can expect to receive a solid education at least, and a superb one if they harness the resources.

But our children haven’t learned healthy ways to communicate their feelings. Nor about child development, the science of learning, or group dynamics. A little about the power of bias. Only now, this little bit is clearly not enough. Because they walk around with computers in their hands, connected by social networks. They received no lesson on how Instagram can hurt self-esteemno lesson on how multitasking reduces efficiency in all tasks, little guidance on analyzing data sources to determine what is true, no warnings about anger and how it turns hateful when it escalates online, and no education on drivers research and their goal of creating dependency in the user.

I have dealt with many teenagers during this emergence of social media. I showed them how the buzzing of their cell phones during sessions interferes with their concentration and disrupts the continuity of our relationship. When they report slights suffered on Facebook, and I wonder why they stick around, their typical response is FOMO. After our conversation, they realize that what they will be spared from leaving Facebook is their unhealthy relationship pattern – usually tied to past patterns and almost never resolved virtually.

In a recent talk given in Philadelphia, 2021 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Maria Ressa explained that lying generates more activity on social media than telling the truth. And because there are no penalties for spreading lies – in fact, there is a profit motive in spreading them – they inundate us. The the role of social media has been central in facilitating election interference, fomenting hatred, obscuring real reality and encouraging violence. Ressa advises that for now, we organize opposition to this roadblock and enact laws to regulate the airways of the internet, and in the long term, educate our children so that they can protect themselves from this mode of transmission of feelings. and information.

We have not, in my lifetime, been so divided. There are several reasons for this crack, including the destructive influence of social media. We should not underestimate the impact of additional existential threats, such as mass immigration, climate change and the recent pandemic. Under such pressures, people seek out others who look like them – noticing shared ethnicity, skin color or religion. They tend to create hierarchies: my group is the best and we are entitled to more than yours. Sometimes they dehumanize members of the other group. The best way to immunize people against fragmentation is to teach them what leads to it and to help them deal with their mixed feelings.

The starting point is where 90% of children meet: public school. And they can’t afford to wait 19 years to learn these principles.

Andrew Smolar, MD, is a clinical associate professor of psychiatry at Temple University School of Medicine.

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Wigan high school teacher features in new teaching careers campaign https://abilitiesnetworks.org/wigan-high-school-teacher-features-in-new-teaching-careers-campaign/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 03:45:33 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/wigan-high-school-teacher-features-in-new-teaching-careers-campaign/ A national survey, conducted by One Poll, of over 2,000 parents of working adults aged 18+ in England, was carried out for Get Into Teaching – the national campaign to encourage people to consider teaching like a career. It explores the sense of pride parents take in their children’s current jobs or careers, and how […]]]>

A national survey, conducted by One Poll, of over 2,000 parents of working adults aged 18+ in England, was carried out for Get Into Teaching – the national campaign to encourage people to consider teaching like a career. It explores the sense of pride parents take in their children’s current jobs or careers, and how they would feel if their child played a role with a greater sense of purpose.

Read more

Huge increase in Wigan children starting school needing speech and language…

The research also revealed that: 35% of parents enjoy telling their adult child how proud they are of them, 68% would be proud to tell others if their (now adult) child became a teacher, 67% believe that they would make a good one. When asked what makes them most proud, half of parents said “it’s the person they grew up to be.” When thinking about alternative career options, 48% of parents in Greater Manchester said they would feel even more proud if their child worked in a role seen as ‘giving something back to society’, such as in healthcare or education. Coinciding with the new findings, the Get Into Teaching campaign released a new online video featuring excerpts from interviews with members of the public.

Addison Brown, 30, science teacher and deputy head of science curriculum, at Atherton High School, Wigan.

Addison Brown, 30, a science teacher and deputy head of the science curriculum at Atherton High School, is already a familiar face on our screens.

He said: “I have a sports background and as I progressed I got involved in mentoring and teaching others which I really enjoyed. I have also always had a passion for science, and after graduating from university I realized that I could combine my two passions by training myself in teaching.

“I have never looked back. Teaching can be hard work, but it is extremely satisfying to know that you are helping to shape lives by enabling young people to reach their full potential. My parents have always been proud of my accomplishments and have given me a lot of encouragement and support in my teaching career.My mother is also a teacher, so I know she was especially proud when I decided to follow the same path.

Roger Pope, spokesperson for the Get Into Teaching campaign and national education leader, said: “Our research highlights how proud parents across the country are of their children’s achievements in the workplace, and they do not hesitate to do so. tell others about it! Yet it’s also interesting to hear how they would feel even more proud if their child worked in a role seen as giving something back – and how many think their child would make a good teacher.

“At a time when many final year university students and recent graduates are exploring their future career options, I encourage anyone interested in a career that allows you to make your mark on the world to consider teaching. The teaching is exciting and dynamic – and you’ll be proud of that too.

For anyone interested in teaching as a career, the Get Into Teaching service has experienced teacher training advisors available to provide free support and advice.

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Soil science: 20 activities for elementary school children https://abilitiesnetworks.org/soil-science-20-activities-for-elementary-school-children/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 00:21:37 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/soil-science-20-activities-for-elementary-school-children/ Earth science lessons are fun for kids! They can ask and answer questions about our beautiful planet through hands-on activities. But, these lessons aren’t complete without some earth-focused activities, to be exact. Elementary school kids apparently like to get dirty, so why not let them get down to business and discover one of Earth’s amazing […]]]>

Earth science lessons are fun for kids! They can ask and answer questions about our beautiful planet through hands-on activities. But, these lessons aren’t complete without some earth-focused activities, to be exact. Elementary school kids apparently like to get dirty, so why not let them get down to business and discover one of Earth’s amazing and underrated resources? Follow us for an amazing list of 20 interesting and practical floor activity ideas.

1. Plant growth activity

This favorite soil science project works for STEM fairs or can be used to form a long term survey! Students can test soil nutrients to see whether or not plants grow better in one type of soil than another. You can even test multiple soil types.

Learn more: Generation Genius

2. Analyze soil composition

Help kids become soil scientists by analyzing the quality and composition of organic matter, distinguishing various soil qualities as you go.

Learn more: Nature.org

3. Sid the Science Kid: Dirt on Dirt

Younger students will love this video series as a stand-alone lesson or as part of an on-floor unit. These videos save teachers time and are a great springboard for your on-the-floor STEM lessons.

Learn more: PBS learning material

4. Soil Composition Lesson

This is a great lesson starter for upper elementary students to teach learners how soil is made up of various things and is an important element in many aspects of daily life.

Learn more here: PBS learning material

5. Level Reading

Add these texts to your Earth and Soil Science lessons. Many people don’t realize that healthy soil is important for everyday life. These readings are a great way to start your soil exploration, as they outline the basis and importance of this often overlooked scientific subject.

Learn more: National geographic

6. Interactive map of soils by state

This soil digital resource describes the soil profile of each state. This online tool gives soil properties for all fifty states, including what is grown, proper names of soil samples, fun facts and more!

Learn more: Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History

7. Soil Vocabulary

Give kids the opportunity to learn about soil terms by learning root words with this easy-to-follow fact sheet for students. They must understand the vocabulary to understand the different layers of soil.

Learn more: Smithsonian Environmental Research Center

8. What is our soil worth?

Perfect for whole-class teaching, this lesson plan features a variety of soil-type slides, a form for students, and a list of accompanying resources to help get their soil activity started while keeping kids engaged!

Learn more: National agriculture in the classroom

9. Study of the exterior ground

Using innovative soil experiments and a field log, this study tracks real-time student data to investigate this overlooked organic matter. They’ll learn about soil quality, soil types and more using these simple fun and interactive soil science tests.

Learn more: Field Museum

10. Take a virtual field trip

The Underground Adventure exhibit is a great introduction to the ground. Use this link as an option for students to take a virtual field trip to discover why this organic material is so important. Add it to a floor choice board where students can choose the activities they want to do.

Learn more: Field Museum

11. Celebrate World Soil Day

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations has put together this short list of six sample soil activities to do with your students to celebrate World Soil Day. You can add these fun experiments to your science unit on the floor!

Learn more: Food and Agriculture Organization

12. Dirt Detectives

This simple and effective activity only requires a few tablespoons of soil from different locations and a lab worksheet for students to record their findings. You can even use it on a Soil Activity Choice Board where kids can become scientists studying the soil.

Learn more: PBS Kids

13. Soil bases

Have students use this website to do some preliminary soil research. From soil layers to quality and everything in between, this website offers a wide variety of background information to help students learn about this organic matter.

Learn more: Soil Science Society of America

14. Use Diagrams

This website shows a variety of useful diagrams for students to learn about and support all the layers of soil activity you might have to offer. Students can learn the components of soil simply by visiting this website before doing any soil experiment. To link content to memory, have them design their own diagrams in groups.

Learn more: Nature.com

15. Edible Soil Layers

This delicious and interactive lesson gives kids an “earth cup” that will really help them visualize (and taste) the layers of earth that make up the crust. Of all the dirt activities, this one will probably be the most memorable for students because, let’s face it, kids love to eat!

Learn more: Learning Resources

16. Soil sampling stations

Soil STEM activities work best when kids are able to move around to stay engaged, so why not get kids moving with in-room soil sampler stations? This soil lesson helps children understand the variety of soil types, and although it is labeled as middle school, it is suitable for upper primary just by changing the standards.

Learn more: GLAquarium.com

17. Ground Texture Shaker

As far as soil labs go, this one has to be on your list. Combine soil samples found around your area with the required liquids and watch the solution settle before analyzing the composition.

Learn more: Teagasc

18. Use soil test kits

Purchase soil test kits for another soil lab experiment and have students bring a soil sample from home. This will help them understand soil properties and tell them what types of soil are common in their area.

Learn more: AP Science Education

19. Soil Life Survey

Many soil lessons focus on the soil itself, but this one, in particular, focuses on the life (or lack of) that can be found in the soil. Introduce students to the vitality of the soil at school with an investigation into the life of the soil.

Learn more: ABC of Child’s Play

20. Create a dewormer

Whether you have 1st graders, 3rd graders, or anyone in between, engage ground-level learners by building a worm farm using a typical glass tank. Have your students observe the worms daily and record what they observe.

Learn more: ABC of Child’s Play

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Licensed employee, may lose teaching license https://abilitiesnetworks.org/licensed-employee-may-lose-teaching-license/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/licensed-employee-may-lose-teaching-license/ A Patrick County Public Schools employee was terminated with a recommendation to revoke his teaching license. No further information was released about the former employee referred to only as “Case Number 22-001” at Thursday’s meeting of the Patrick County School Board in Stuart. On Tuesday evening, the school board met for 6 hours behind closed […]]]>

A Patrick County Public Schools employee was terminated with a recommendation to revoke his teaching license.

No further information was released about the former employee referred to only as “Case Number 22-001” at Thursday’s meeting of the Patrick County School Board in Stuart.

On Tuesday evening, the school board met for 6 hours behind closed doors, joined by what appeared to be lawyers. Four people who were waiting outside in the lobby entered the board and visitors, one at a time, for about 30-40 minutes each.

On Thursday, the board voted to dismiss employee file number 22-001 and also decided to recommend revoking the employee’s teaching license and to send that recommendation to the Virginia Department of Education. . The only board member, Walter Scott, voted against it, but it was voted down.

No other information has been communicated on this subject.

People also read…

Child care proposal

The school board has approved a revised list of projects to spend the 1% sales tax increase. This will include a technology room in the new school board building at the corner of North Main and Rye Cove streets, among other projects such as paving the grassy lot behind this building to create a parking lot.

However, this would dash hopes of a proposed child care center that would accommodate 80 children just across Rye Cove Street from this building.

At last month’s meeting, Patrick County Economic Development Executive Director Sean Adkins proposed that the board begin a discussion to share the land behind their new building with a proposed daycare center.

The proposed daycare, which would be on the lower level of the Development Center at 132 and 136 Slusher St., is in the grant application phase, Adkins reported to the school board in October.

During the application process, Adkins said, it was discovered that 75 square feet of outdoor space is required for each child a center aims to serve. Properties on Slusher Street do not have enough space to meet this minimum, but there is plenty of space in the grassy area behind the new administration building.

He was not present at the November board meeting.

In other subjects:

The board approved the staff report unanimously, hiring Katie Lawson as assistant principal of Patrick County High School (PCHS), Sandra Stowe as bus helper, Reva Pierce as bus helper, and Samuel Dawson as technology technician.

The following have resigned: Elizabeth Martin as Special Education Teacher at PCHS and Terrance Draper as Student Success Counselor at Patrick Springs Elementary School (PSPS) and Hardin Reynolds Memorial School (HRMS) .

The following people transferred: Madison Stone from grant-funded teaching assistant to full-time teaching assistant at PCHS, Michael Schultz from substitute to part-time cafeteria worker at PCHS, and Karen Walton from substitute to teaching assistant at Stuart Elementary School (SES).

The following people have retired: Roger Shelton as a bus driver and Sherry Hartman as a teaching assistant at HRMS and PSPS.

The board approved an amended bid for a construction proposal from Clark Brothers Company Inc. without discussion.

Superintendent Jason Wood delivered his report, congratulating the school group for not being defeated this season, noting improved writing scores in the fall, and announcing that the public is invited to come to the December meeting to “provide us with information” on the expenditure of ESSER funds.

The board approved the consent agenda which contained the minutes of the October 13 meeting, regular invoices, monthly financial report and maintenance improvement report.

Scott suggested the board put money into a higher-risk savings account that would be reviewed quarterly to try to achieve some fund growth for the school system.

The PCPS board of directors meets for 6 hours behind closed doors, without any announced measures being taken

Stuart daycare for 80 in the works

Monique Holland is a reporter for the Martinsville Bulletin. She can be reached at monique.holland@martinsvillebulletin.com or at 276-734-9603.

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This Mom Wants Parents To Stop Teaching ‘Stranger Danger’ And Do It Instead https://abilitiesnetworks.org/this-mom-wants-parents-to-stop-teaching-stranger-danger-and-do-it-instead/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 11:03:43 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/this-mom-wants-parents-to-stop-teaching-stranger-danger-and-do-it-instead/ A mom asked others Parents to stop teaching their children about “stranger danger” and instead try to talk about strange behavior. Mom and blogger Marcie Whelan says she doesn’t teach her daughters about ‘stranger danger’ because she wants them to ‘be outgoing, have conversations with people and be… hospitable to those who touch them. surround”. […]]]>

A mom asked others Parents to stop teaching their children about “stranger danger” and instead try to talk about strange behavior.

Mom and blogger Marcie Whelan says she doesn’t teach her daughters about ‘stranger danger’ because she wants them to ‘be outgoing, have conversations with people and be… hospitable to those who touch them. surround”.

In a Tiktok video titled “Why not teach a stranger about danger”Whelan says she understands where it’s coming from – “parents try to protect their children [and] keep them safe” – but, she adds, “most people are good people”.

So instead of talking about stranger danger, she suggests instead talking to children about strange behavior “because children are most often abused or hurt by people they know, whether it’s a close family member or an acquaintance is very rarely a stranger”.

She’s right, like up to 93% of child victims of sexual abuse know the abuser, according to the Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN).

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Former Decatur teaching assistant and coach pleads obscenity https://abilitiesnetworks.org/former-decatur-teaching-assistant-and-coach-pleads-obscenity/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 19:30:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/former-decatur-teaching-assistant-and-coach-pleads-obscenity/ DECATURE — Matthew E. Krausethe former Decatur Public Schools teaching assistant and high school softball coach who sent a 14-year-old student a photo of his penis, pleaded guilty Thursday to an obscenity charge. The plea was part of a deal that included two more serious charges – sexual exploitation of a child and using electronic […]]]>

DECATURE — Matthew E. Krausethe former Decatur Public Schools teaching assistant and high school softball coach who sent a 14-year-old student a photo of his penis, pleaded guilty Thursday to an obscenity charge.

The plea was part of a deal that included two more serious charges – sexual exploitation of a child and using electronic means to groom a child for sex – both licensed in Macon County Circuit Court.

People also read…

Krause, who had been a teaching assistant at the French Academy elementary school and a coach at Eisenhower High School, was punished for the obscenity conviction with 24 months probation and a $500 fine. .

Obscenity is a Class A misdemeanor and Krause’s conviction does not subject the 30-year-old defendant to the reporting requirements under the Sex Offender Registration Act.

How to use our electronic publishing feature on the Herald & Review website.



The plea deal for Krause followed a previous court case involving Dylan W. Nunn, 30, a former first-year women’s basketball coach at Eisenhower, and the same student.

Following the death of his attorney, Nunn defended himself against two charges of indecent solicitation/aggravated criminal sexual abuse and two counts of grooming. A judge, in a bench trial in September, acquitted Nunn after ruling that the prosecution had failed to meet the burden of proof.

Special Prosecutor Kate Kurtz prosecuted this case and was also the prosecutor for Krause, who was defended by attorney Hugh Rowden. Defense counsel in a previous motion argued unsuccessfully that a pornographic image sent to a single person did not meet the legal standard of a sexual offence.

Accepting the plea deal, Presiding Judge Thomas Griffith addressed the prosecution and defense lawyers: “This agreement represents a compromise between the two of you based on the outcome of the other case and based on many negotiations between you two. Is that a fair statement, Counsel?

“Yes, sir,” Kurtz replied. “Okay, your honor,” Rowden replied.

The plea deal also spared the victim from having to testify and be cross-examined again, which she had endured in the Nunn trial. Kurtz told the court that Krause’s plea deal had the consent of the girl victim and her mother.

And in a victim impact statement read in court, the mother said her daughter had suffered enough already. In remarks to Krause, the mother said: “You have no idea how embarrassing it was for her to talk about what happened and see all these social media posts slandering my daughter. .

“None of this was his fault; you’re an adult and she was just a child…”

The offense dates back to a period between September 2016 and June 2017, when the mother said her daughter was “going through a difficult time without her father” and she accused Krause of taking advantage of the victim for his own sexual gratification.

She added: “I will never understand why someone like you, who is supposed to be a role model for children, would do something like this…I hope you get the help you need to not put another child in the same situation or even something worse.

Part of Krause’s sentencing was to order him to undergo any recommended mental health treatment while on probation.

Contact Tony Reid at (217) 421-7977. Follow him on Twitter: @TonyJReid

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Tips for Teaching Online – The Tech Edvocate https://abilitiesnetworks.org/tips-for-teaching-online-the-tech-edvocate/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 09:02:29 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/tips-for-teaching-online-the-tech-edvocate/ The first and most essential thing to do is choose and implement a learning management system (LMS) allowing learners and parents to provide home schooling. This could be a district-provided LMS such as Canvas, Google Classrooms, Blackboard, Moodle, or a classroom website created by yourself. You must maintain a single digital platform where you can […]]]>

The first and most essential thing to do is choose and implement a learning management system (LMS) allowing learners and parents to provide home schooling. This could be a district-provided LMS such as Canvas, Google Classrooms, Blackboard, Moodle, or a classroom website created by yourself.

You must maintain a single digital platform where you can update all information for your learners and parents. Updates may include critical information such as the week’s homework schedule, instructions for completing and submitting assignments, reminders, educator contact and availability, and more.

Looking for a way to make your e-learning course easier? Consider using Pedagogue. Pedagogue also empowers educators to create, share, and reuse interactive learning experiences and assessments while leveraging over 30 learning content templates.

Create a Routine

The distance learning system is different from an actual school system. Educators should set up an appropriate daily schedule/routine and keep learners informed about it to avoid confusion among learners. Whether the schedule is entirely academic or just an interaction, it should be clear when teacher and learners should be connected. Having an appropriate daily schedule is necessary, especially for families who have more than one child and share a device. Most schools select two check-in times, a morning meeting and an afternoon check-in, allowing families to organize the home school schedule.

Prepare your lessons

Since learners are at home, maintaining discipline is a big challenge for them. Many will struggle to cope with routine; some will be late; others will miss class check-in time all together. Therefore, it is essential to have a good lesson plan prepared well in advance. Educators should ensure that the curriculum or study material is clearly up to date before the course begins. This will help learners understand what they are going to learn, keep them informed of all the necessary material and help them take a more serious interest in their learning.

Record your lessons

Recording lessons and sharing them with learners is one of the easiest ways for any educator to teach learners from home. Educators can record a video of themselves giving a lesson and then share it with learners via URL or email attachment. A recorded lesson creates the opportunity to maintain the “presence” of the educator and engage learners as if they were in the classroom. Additionally, learners can play the video repeatedly to understand the concept or review the lessons taught.

Some options and tools for recording lesson plans include voice-over and recording functions in multimedia presentation software, screens and video recording tools such as Loom, Screencast-o-Matic, recording in web conferencing applications such as Adobe Connect or Zoom, smartphone video, or recording from a computer webcam.

Create lively discussions

Of course, an online classroom is different from a conventional classroom. Unlike conventional classrooms, the online classroom lacks physical interaction and direct communication between educator and learners. Thus, educators must initiate discussions so that learners participate in the teaching and learning process. This can greatly affect how learners feel in the classroom. Educators should encourage participation, as they would in a conventional classroom. This promotes learner involvement and makes learning more interesting.

Give students personalized feedback

Most learners need extra support or help from educators, either because they are slow learners or because they have certain learning problems. In conventional classrooms, learners can directly ask questions of educators to clear up confusion or to help them understand the concept. However, learners may find it impossible or complicated to ask questions in a distance learning system. In such cases, educators can call learners who need additional support and provide personalized and targeted instruction over the phone or via web conferencing. They can ask learners to provide information such as which method they find easy to learn, which activities help them understand better, their learning interests and preferences, and which topic they find most difficult.

Educators can also ask learners content-based questions to assess their understanding of lessons, solve problems, or reason with the learner to understand their issues and plan the next lesson more effectively.

Provide students with enrichment opportunities

Intense learning for long hours causes learners to lose interest or enthusiasm for learning. To keep them engaged, educators can provide some enriching virtual opportunities or activities like puzzles, games, STEM experiences, etc. They can also encourage learners to move around and be active. To provide such opportunities, educators can refer to platforms such as Enchanted Learning, World Book for Children, Brainpop, Everyday Mysteries, GoNoodle, and STEM Bob.

Evaluate your performance and that of your students

Educators can send assessments to learners via an email attachment for them to be completed and emailed back. To collect feedback, they can use online assessment tools such as Google Forms, Kahoot and Quizlet. Educators can also provide self-assessment opportunities for learners by asking them to reflect on their learning and academic performance, set goals, and create action plans.

Final Thoughts

The sudden transition from conventional education to online education is difficult, especially for conventional educators. I hope the tips above will help most educators master this new normal.

]]> Teaching, not a last resort: Sayed-Khaiyum – FBC News https://abilitiesnetworks.org/teaching-not-a-last-resort-sayed-khaiyum-fbc-news/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 05:17:37 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/teaching-not-a-last-resort-sayed-khaiyum-fbc-news/ AG at the inauguration of the new FNU building. [Photo Credit: Fijian Government] Attorney General Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum said taking education courses should not be the last resort for any student. Addressing students and staff at Fiji National University, the Attorney General said FNU should look into this issue as it is the main training provider […]]]>

AG at the inauguration of the new FNU building. [Photo Credit: Fijian Government]

Attorney General Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum said taking education courses should not be the last resort for any student.

Addressing students and staff at Fiji National University, the Attorney General said FNU should look into this issue as it is the main training provider for those choosing education as career path.

Sayed-Khaiyum says it’s important to have the right people in education.

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“We don’t want a situation where a lot of people, for example, want to take a different course but because they haven’t taken that course they end up teaching because it’s their last resort.”

Sayed-Khaiyum adds that for far too long, primary education has not received the attention it deserves, and this is an area the Ministry of Education is trying to tackle.

“Secondary teachers have been given more prominence than primary teachers as primary education comes through primary teachers so we need to raise the status a bit more and that is what we intend to TO DO.”

The Attorney General says the foundation of education is critically important and that includes how a child learns to read and write in the early years, hence why only those who committed to developing education should attend educational courses.

He says this area has been neglected for many years now and the government is committed to making the appropriate changes.

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‘I was born to do this’: Local woman thrives on teaching, plans to open enrichment center https://abilitiesnetworks.org/i-was-born-to-do-this-local-woman-thrives-on-teaching-plans-to-open-enrichment-center/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 22:16:03 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/i-was-born-to-do-this-local-woman-thrives-on-teaching-plans-to-open-enrichment-center/ GUILFORD COUNTY, NC (WGHP) — Tammy Gilchrist has an infectious love for children. “I really enjoy working with these little children. I do, and I feel like I was born to do this,” she said. Former Winston-Salem councilman receives special proclamation on his 105th birthday As natural as Gilchrist works with children, she didn’t start […]]]>

GUILFORD COUNTY, NC (WGHP) — Tammy Gilchrist has an infectious love for children.

“I really enjoy working with these little children. I do, and I feel like I was born to do this,” she said.

As natural as Gilchrist works with children, she didn’t start her career in the classroom.

“Throughout this journey, I was a telephone operator. I worked in grocery stores but ended up in teaching because I got laid off,” Gilchrist said.

Being fired as a telephone operator was a minor setback that prepared her to pursue her dream career – being a teacher.

She got her foot in the door as a substitute teacher with Children and families first at one of its High Point locations.

Gilchrist heard about the agency’s Child Development Associate apprenticeship program.

The program gave her the free credentials she needed to become a primary teacher working with infants and toddlers.

She completed the program in six months.

Gilchrist is happy in her new role and feels a great sense of accomplishment as she prioritizes her career goals.

“What is gratifying for me overall is to see that I have this certificate here. I achieved something for myself,” she said. “To hold this certificate, and it says my name and not someone else’s name, [it’s] so rewarding because I know it’s a step towards what I want to do.

Gilchrist is moving forward with plans to earn his associate’s degree.

She was accepted into the TEACH program and plans to enroll at Guilford Technical Community College in the spring.

Gilchrist hopes to one day operate his own enrichment center.

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Schools struggle to hire teaching assistants, helpers https://abilitiesnetworks.org/schools-struggle-to-hire-teaching-assistants-helpers/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 23:00:52 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/schools-struggle-to-hire-teaching-assistants-helpers/ Janice Carter and Maira Carmona are longtime teaching assistants in the Hempstead School District, having spent decades in the classroom helping students at Jackson Main School focus and stay on track with the rest of the class. Educators said the two teaching assistants are a crucial part of the elementary school learning experience. They provide […]]]>

Janice Carter and Maira Carmona are longtime teaching assistants in the Hempstead School District, having spent decades in the classroom helping students at Jackson Main School focus and stay on track with the rest of the class.

Educators said the two teaching assistants are a crucial part of the elementary school learning experience. They provide small group or individual instruction that allows the teacher to lead and guide the entire class. But staffers such as Carter and Carmona are becoming increasingly difficult for school systems to hire.

“It’s like finding a needle in a haystack – it’s very difficult,” Jackson senior manager Richard Brown said.

As local districts grapple with recent bus driver shortages and high demand for substitute teachers, they also face shortages of teaching assistants and aides. These roles are essential in the classroom, educators said, whether it’s being part of an educational plan for special education students or helping children who have fallen behind — especially those who are struggling with learning loss due to the disruption of the COVID-19 pandemic.

WHAT THERE IS TO KNOW

  • As local districts grapple with recent bus driver shortages and high demand for substitute teachers, they are also facing a shortage of teaching assistants and aides.
  • Several agencies are mobilized to help with staffing. Teacher assistants perform instructional services under the direction of the teacher, while teacher assistants typically perform non-teaching services. Many teacher assistants work specifically with special education students.
  • The National Bureau of Labor Statistics said there were 131,100 teaching assistants employed in New York in 2019 and 108,780 in May 2021, a drop of more than 17%.

Several agencies have stepped up to help with staffing. Eastern Suffolk BOCES, which employs around 300 assistants and 500 assistants, has increased the number of job fairs in the community. Suffolk County Community College is working with local schools to help make up the shortfall. Molloy University of Rockville Center has launched free workshops to help prospective employees pass a test requirement. The Sachem School District provided a recruitment tool this fall to 12,000 families in the community to let them know they are hiring.

“We often say that we are able to run the classes we do and support the students we have through the work of our aides and assistants,” said Ryan Ruf, chief operating officer at Eastern Suffolk BOCES.

Less “interested” in education

While teacher shortages have been reported nationwide, that’s not the case on Long Island, said Dominick Palma, chairman of the Nassau County Board of School Superintendents. He said he mostly hears from school officials about the lack of assistants and helpers.

Palma counted available positions nearly two months into the school year on an online hiring database for educators and found 85 job offers for aides on Long Island and 17 for teaching assistants. . The National Bureau of Labor Statistics showed 131,100 teaching assistants employed in New York in 2019 and 108,780 in May 2021, a drop of more than 17%.

“Part of it has to do with a reduction in the number of people interested in education,” said Palma, the superintendent of Merrick. “Previously, teaching assistants and assistants often came out of the community – they were mostly women leaving the workforce and their kids were older and now back… I see that a lot less.”

The state Department of Labor reported a median annual salary of $34,740 for teaching assistants on Long Island, with more than 19,000 employees.

“What I don’t think people realize is that with a teaching assistant job they can make $28,000 to $38,000 a year and that often comes with a union benefit,” said said Donna Ciampa, acting executive dean of the Michael J. Grant Campus at Suffolk County Community College.

“When they’re union members, they get the medical benefits and the retirement benefits, and I’m not sure they factor that into their actual work,” said Ciampa, who teaches education classes. .

The college works with local school systems, including Brentwood, to encourage community college students to consider working as assistants or aides.

Teacher assistants perform instructional services under the direction of the teacher, while aides often perform non-teaching services. Many teacher assistants work specifically with special education students. They do not need to be certified.

There are four levels of certification to become an assistant in the state – all of which require passing a test called the New York State Assessment of Teaching Assistant Skills. They must also pass workshops on child abuse, school violence, bullying prevention, and the Dignity for All Students Act. Going beyond the first level as an assistant requires some college and classroom experience.

This summer, for the first time, Molloy University offered a free online test prep workshop. Another workshop was held on October 19 in preparation for the state certification exam. They don’t have to be a Molloy student, said Louis Cino, dean of continuing education and professional studies.

It was launched “last year based on feedback we received from districts saying they had a very difficult time finding applicants,” he said. “It’s getting harder and harder for companies these days to find people who are willing to work in person…I think those jobs are becoming less and less favorable.”

Increased awareness efforts

East Suffolk BOCES have stepped up their outreach efforts. The organization, which serves students in 51 districts, held three job fairs in the county last year and one earlier this month — and had success in hiring from home, Ruf said. Last year, the organization adjusted salaries for aides to be more competitive.

Larry Street, 68, of Riverhead, filled out an application at the BOCES job fair in Holtsville. He is a semi-retired educator and is looking to return to the classroom.

“I’ve been on the pitch for a very long time and…I feel like I have a lot to offer,” he said.

In the Sachem district, Theresa Arne has worked as a caregiver for 17 years. She is assigned as a “one-to-one” aide to first-grade students with special needs at Hiawatha Elementary School in Lake Ronkonkoma.

“It’s so rewarding for me. I get to see the student every day and see their progress throughout the year academically and socially,” she said.

To find staff members like Arne, the district sent out a Google form to about 12,000 families in the district notifying them of vacancies. They received about 200 responses, Superintendent Christopher J. Pellettieri said.

“It’s been very difficult this year, more than the others,” he said. Despite the shortage, Pellettieri said classes were covered, even if the district had to use a substitute. “It’s been tough, but we’re making it work,” he said.

At Hempstead, Carmona and Carter worked together as teaching assistants for more than two decades each, and both said they weren’t ready to retire just yet. They often meet former students who are doctors, lawyers or even teachers in their own district.

“One thing I really love about being a teaching assistant is that I love helping kids learn, especially newcomers to our country,” said Carmona, who is a teaching assistant. bilingual education.

Carter added, “This work is very important and very rewarding. There are children who are behind…and now after the pandemic even more so. These are children who really need our support.”

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