Child mentoring – Abilities Networks http://abilitiesnetworks.org/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 00:34:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-4.png Child mentoring – Abilities Networks http://abilitiesnetworks.org/ 32 32 Grand Area Mentoring Awarded Seed Grant to Moonflower Seeds | Go out and go https://abilitiesnetworks.org/grand-area-mentoring-awarded-seed-grant-to-moonflower-seeds-go-out-and-go/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 00:34:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/grand-area-mentoring-awarded-seed-grant-to-moonflower-seeds-go-out-and-go/ Some of the most powerful bonding experiences that Daniel McNeil, Grand Area Mentoring Program Director, has had with his childhood mentors have been over meals. There is something about eating together that brings people together, he says. When McNeil applied for the Seeds to Start grant through the Moonflower Community Co-op, on behalf of Grand […]]]>

Some of the most powerful bonding experiences that Daniel McNeil, Grand Area Mentoring Program Director, has had with his childhood mentors have been over meals. There is something about eating together that brings people together, he says.

When McNeil applied for the Seeds to Start grant through the Moonflower Community Co-op, on behalf of Grand Area Mentoring, he had these moments in mind: His proposed use of the grant money would be to provide mentors and mentees. vouchers for Moonflower, so the pairs could learn, buy and enjoy snacks together.

Grand Area Mentoring received the grant in December. The mentoring program began in 2005, pairing adult volunteers with children seeking guidance. Mentors and mentees meet for one hour a week and form friendships. 22 currently paired mentors / mentees will benefit from the Moonflower grant, McNeil said.

“I think it will give [mentees] a new opportunity to shop in a place where they might never have been before, ”said McNeil. “They are going to experience something new, their horizons are going to broaden and they are going to have a bonding experience with their mentors.”

When the program started it was based in the Grand County School District – mentors met their mentees there. But a few years ago, McNeil developed a new program: Once mentees have formed a friendship with their mentor and reached middle school, they can meet their mentors outside of school.

The purpose of the Moonflower Seeds to Start grant is to provide financial assistance to any local nonprofit or individual who will “cultivate holistic community well-being,” which can be interpreted in a variety of ways, said Maggie Keating, coordinator of Marketing and Outreach at Moonflower. .

“The mentor and mentees can use the grant as an experience to learn about so many different things in the co-op,” she said. “From local food and local farms to the environmental impact of our globalized food system, and why we try to focus so much on sourcing our food locally and fairly and sustainably. “

She and three other co-op employees were part of the grants committee this year and ultimately chose Grand Area Mentoring because they were inspired by the idea that the grant could be used to directly educate community members who don’t. might not have this opportunity otherwise.

Grand Area Mentoring is always looking to increase its number of adult mentors, McNeil said. Currently, the program has over 20 children on the waiting list. In 2020, the program had to take a hiatus due to complications with the COVID-19 pandemic. But towards the end of last year, the program started to grow slowly again: a new cohort of mentors started in September, and another cohort will start at the end of January 2022.

Adult volunteers go through a major screening and training process before they are matched, and it works: The national average for the mentor-mentee program relationships is around six months, McNeil said, but the Grand Area mentors Mentoring typically work with their mentees for at least three months. year.

“Many mentors find this volunteer opportunity extremely rewarding,” said McNeil. “There is a real need for more mentors. We would like to match some of these kids eager to have a mentor and eager to be guided with the kind and responsible adults we know in Moab.

Mentees run from Grades 1 to 12, with most new matches being done at the elementary school level – the perfect time for a child to enter the program is between Grades 2 and 5, said McNeil.

Any adult interested in volunteering can upload an application on the Grand Area Mentoring website (www.grandmentoring.org). The next mentor orientation will take place on Thursday, January 27.


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How Police Lt. Ronrico Davis found a passion for serving Montgomery, mentoring kids in a music studio https://abilitiesnetworks.org/how-police-lt-ronrico-davis-found-a-passion-for-serving-montgomery-mentoring-kids-in-a-music-studio/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 04:04:19 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/how-police-lt-ronrico-davis-found-a-passion-for-serving-montgomery-mentoring-kids-in-a-music-studio/ Becoming a police officer was one of the last careers Ronrico Davis expected. Growing up on the West Side, he didn’t have the best opinion of the police. A few bad actors can make the experience worse, Davis explained, especially during the formative years. It is not a rare feeling among kids in Montgomery today, […]]]>

Becoming a police officer was one of the last careers Ronrico Davis expected.

Growing up on the West Side, he didn’t have the best opinion of the police. A few bad actors can make the experience worse, Davis explained, especially during the formative years.

It is not a rare feeling among kids in Montgomery today, said Davis.

Growing up, Davis loved music, especially hip hop and R&B. After graduating from high school, he interned at the SNA production studio with Michael London, where his passion for music blossomed.

“It put me in the atmosphere, the production work, the music. I just got a taste of it,” Davis said. “Music progressed slowly during this time, so I needed to find a job, but music has been and always will be my passion.”

With a son on the way, Davis applied for the police department, fire department and various other jobs.

“The police department was the first to call me back,” he said.

Ronrico Davis poses for a photo at his studio in Montgomery, Alabama on Tuesday, December 14, 2021.

During his nearly 20 years in the ministry, Davis rose to the rank of lieutenant and served as a downtown division commander. He dedicated himself to becoming the opposite of the police officers he remembered growing up, the ones who gave him that negative take on the police.

“I knew I didn’t want to be that,” he said. “I wanted to be closer to the community. “

The answer? Music.

“Some people ask me how I can be a police officer and work with rappers,” Davis explained. “It’s all about building relationships. “

His career and passion intersect frequently, and more recently at the crossroads of the two is the youth of Montgomery.

Charles Lee, creator of It’s My Child, met Davis while they were recording a podcast and, seizing an opportunity, asked to bring some of the kids he works with to the studio.

“It’s hard to say no to Charles,” Davis said with a laugh. “He brought them once, but several came back alone. They went from rap in their closet to a professional setting.

Coaching kids in music production might not have been something Davis expected, but it’s something he has grown to love, just like working as a police officer.

“It’s about building relationships, finding commonalities,” he explained. “When I’m on a stage, I ask them what their favorite music is. It is a universal language. You can connect with people through music.

In the studio, Davis lets it be known that he is an officer.

“It’s one of the first things I lead with,” he said. “Some kids have to be comfortable with that, and that’s okay. It’s about building that trust, letting them know that every officer isn’t trying to take them to jail. I come from where they are. I understand. But working in law enforcement also put me in that position, helped me build that and mentor these kids. “

Ever since these early teens were brought into the studio, he’s seen them make great music.

“It’s gratifying. You want to see them be big, ”he said. “I can watch them finish whatever project they want to finish. They teach me too. They are the future and I am the present, trying to get them there.

About the series

The Montgomery announcer to watch is a series of everyday Alabamian stories that we believe will do great things in our communities over the coming year. Our readers and journalists named this year’s list. The advertiser will publish the profiles of these winners from December 23 to early January.

Three questions with Ron Rico Davis

What is Montgomery’s greatest attribute?

“I think our biggest attribute is the kids. We have a great talent here. A great talent hidden in the town of Montgomery and with the support of the people who are there now we can push them to be seen more.”

What has the pandemic taught you about yourself?

“Never stop. You never know what situation you might find yourself in. Always stay one step ahead, so that you are ahead when something happens, you can prepare for it … Be able to take care of you.”

Name someone in the community who inspires you.

“The community inspires me. Period. You know, watching new kids, growing up, producing at such a young age, being able to understand work and make great music, and I love that. very energetic seeing the young children are not on the streets and are in the studio and creative. It inspires me every day. “

Contact Montgomery Advertiser reporter Kirsten Fiscus at 334-318-1798 or KFiscus@gannett.com. Follow her on Twitter @KDFiscus

This article originally appeared on Montgomery Advertiser: How police and music production intersect for a Montgomery officer


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A proclamation on National Mentoring Month, 2022 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/a-proclamation-on-national-mentoring-month-2022/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 20:32:34 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/a-proclamation-on-national-mentoring-month-2022/ I often say that America can be defined in one word: possibilities. No matter where we come from or what our circumstances, every child in America has a right to go as far as their dreams take. But these dreams are rarely achieved on their own. We all benefit from the support, wisdom and accompaniment […]]]>

I often say that America can be defined in one word: possibilities. No matter where we come from or what our circumstances, every child in America has a right to go as far as their dreams take. But these dreams are rarely achieved on their own. We all benefit from the support, wisdom and accompaniment of mentors who have walked the path that came before us.

Standing on the shoulders of mentors, young people have moved America forward at every turn in our history. I will never forget the many mentors who encouraged and empowered me as a student, as a local elected official in my twenties, and as a young US Senator who found my way. During National Mentoring Month, we honor all parents and family members, teachers and coaches, employers and colleagues, community and religious leaders, and many more who dedicate their time, care and energy to helping our young people. to flourish.

As we continue to rebuild after the pandemic, my administration is making unprecedented investments to prepare the next generation for success. Earlier this year, the Ministry of Labor awarded $ 89 million through its YouthBuild program and over $ 20 million through its Workforce Pathways for Youth programs to dedicated mentors who share their wisdom and experience. and provide employment and counseling services to young people. We also proudly support the initiatives of our departments and executive agencies that provide one-to-one tuition, community service opportunities, school and after-school programs, summer learning and enrichment, and workplace learning opportunities.

As lawyer and activist Marian Wright Edelman said, “It is the responsibility of every adult – especially parents, educators and religious leaders – to ensure that children hear what we have learned from lessons of life and hear again and again that we love them and that they are not alone. Mentorship is essential in taking on this responsibility, expanding opportunities, and helping our children realize their God-given potential.

THEREFORE, I, JOSEPH R. BIDEN JR., President of the United States of America, by authority conferred on me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, hereby proclaim January 2022 Month national mentoring. I call on Americans across the country to observe this month with appropriate mentorship, ceremonies, activities and programs.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF I have appended my signature this thirtieth day of December, in the year of grace two thousand and twenty-one and of the independence of the United States of America on the two hundred and forty-six.

JOSEPH R. BIDEN JR.


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Brookings register | Larson Manufacturing Donates $ 8,000 to Youth Mentorship Program https://abilitiesnetworks.org/brookings-register-larson-manufacturing-donates-8000-to-youth-mentorship-program/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 16:38:46 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/brookings-register-larson-manufacturing-donates-8000-to-youth-mentorship-program/ BROOKINGS – The Brookings County Youth Mentorship Program recently received a donation from Larson Manufacturing Company. The financial contribution of $ 8,000 was made by Larson employees. “BCYMP is grateful for the generosity of Larson Manufacturing Company. Our mentors help mentees discover who they are and encourage the young person to engage and contribute to […]]]>

BROOKINGS – The Brookings County Youth Mentorship Program recently received a donation from Larson Manufacturing Company. The financial contribution of $ 8,000 was made by Larson employees.

“BCYMP is grateful for the generosity of Larson Manufacturing Company. Our mentors help mentees discover who they are and encourage the young person to engage and contribute to the world around them. Our mentors are volunteers, and we don’t expect them to make any financial commitments to be a mentor. We are happy to be able to support our mentors so that they can focus on the development relationship with their mentee, ”said Ali Teesdale, CEO of BCYMP.

The national average cost for programs like BCYMP is $ 1,695 per year / per child; yet, BCYMP does this job effectively each year for less than $ 1,000 per pair of BCYMP mentors. Therefore, this donation will fully support eight pairs of mentors throughout the year. BCYMP currently serves approximately 115 pairs of 1: 1 mentors, supports youth breakout opportunities and has a waiting list of over 30 mentees to participate in the program.

Larson Manufacturing Company employees are used to supporting BCYMP. Besides financial contributions, they have also created tie covers in the past, encouraged employees to be a mentor, and also have families with students in the program.

Research shows that mentors play an important role in providing young people with the tools to make responsible choices, attend and engage in school, and reduce or avoid risky behavior. In turn, these young people are 55% more likely to be enrolled in college, 81% more likely to report regularly participating in sports or extracurricular activities, 78% more likely to volunteer regularly in their community and more than twice. more likely to say they held a leadership position at a club or sports team. Yet the same research shows that one in three young people in our country will grow up without a mentor.

BCYMP values ​​companies like Larson Manufacturing Company who believe in the power of mentoring and support the BCYMP mission to increase the resilience of youth in our community and add protective factors by building and sustaining cohesive and nurturing relationships with adults. trained and caring.

BCYMP will be celebrating National Mentoring Month in January. To learn more about this and BCYMP, visit bcymentoring.org. You can also contact Teesdale directly at [email protected] or by calling 605-697-0444.


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Supervision of disabled students | Cashmere amount https://abilitiesnetworks.org/supervision-of-disabled-students-cashmere-amount/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 15:56:23 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/supervision-of-disabled-students-cashmere-amount/ Teaching specially disabled students is no ordinary job, but requires immense “courage, patience and dedication” to help them grow, according to Kashmir-based Inclusive Educators (IEs). There is, however, a dearth of such teachers in Kashmir, but many of them still mark the lives of hundreds of these children. Cashmere amount main correspondent Riyaz Bhat spoke […]]]>

Teaching specially disabled students is no ordinary job, but requires immense “courage, patience and dedication” to help them grow, according to Kashmir-based Inclusive Educators (IEs). There is, however, a dearth of such teachers in Kashmir, but many of them still mark the lives of hundreds of these children.

Cashmere amount main correspondent Riyaz Bhat spoke to some of the special tutors who shared their experience as a guide and mentor for students with disabilities.

Assiya Kousar

Inclusive education tutor Samagra Shiksha

Kousar says that on average, special needs educators visit homes of at least 2-3 specially disabled students that they have identified for inclusive education (EI).

“Among these, there are students who cannot be educated and therefore we do the ‘follow-ups’. We explain to their parents how they can try to get their pupils to understand some of the basic things like daily activities, life and ideals. Kousar said

Kousar, 29, says that in the Budgam area, the government has set up a resource room in Ompora in which at least six students with disabilities are enrolled.

“Although IE students have different levels of disability, we need to teach each student individually,” she said.

Kousar also says that the way of teaching specially able students is entirely different and requires a lot of patience and love for them to understand everything being taught to them.

“We usually show pictures or models to silent students. They have to do picture reading. However, for visually impaired students we use braille script, ”she said.

Braille is a tactile writing system used by visually impaired people, including people who are blind, deafblind or visually impaired. It can be read either on embossed paper or using updatable braille displays that connect to computers and smartphones.

Kousar has been teaching students with disabilities since 2017. “So far, I have taught at least 20 students with different types of disabilities.”

She said, “In Budgam district, at least 137 of these students are enrolled, among whom more than 80 students can train through IE, but the staff is very weak.

Kousar also says that at least three different students have left private schools and enrolled in our EI resource room.

Sabreen zahra

Inclusive education tutor Samagra Shiksha

For Sabreen Zahra, 30, teaching students with disabilities takes a lot of courage and hard work, along with an Honors Bachelor of Education degree.

“We can’t do that with a normal B.Ed or Post Graduation (PG),” she said.

Originally from the Hawal district of Srinagar city, Zahra says that Samagra Shiksha has dedicated a special resource room for this purpose in each area of ​​the district.

“I also have a resource room at the Nawakadal Boys Upper Secondary School. We don’t have exact data on students with disabilities because every now and then a new special child is enrolled, ”she said.

Zahra said: “For special lessons and to fill the gap, students usually come for special lessons, special lessons and sometimes, whenever they have problems on a particular topic or need help. special attention, assistance or advice, they visit us two or three times a year in my resource room.

The inclusive special tutor Zahra says that Samagra Shiksha has many special teachers working in Srinagar.

Students with special abilities receive lessons from different teachers specializing in different fields.

Zahra is specialized in B.Ed Specialized Education Intellectual Handicap. “In addition, inclusive teachers should undergo special training provided by Samagra Shiksha where they learn sign language for deaf and dumb students, braille training for blind students and other classes for students with hearing disabilities. delay in speaking. “

“Physically handicapped students with motor disabilities receive special help in special education in resource rooms and for special physiotherapy, they are referred to the Composite Research Center (CRC) Bemina to fill these types of gaps”, he said. she declared.

She also says, “Currently, I teach six to eight special students who regularly attend special classes in my resource room. “

Sharing the successes of her students, Zahra said, “One of the deaf and dumb students recently passed her 10th grade and another upper secondary student from Soura also got decent marks on her 12th jury exams. “

She says being a special teacher is totally different and difficult from a normal teacher. “In addition to special training, we need to have a caliber, a potential and, most importantly, this mindset to teach such students. “

Zahra also says it takes a lot of determination to teach special students.

“To make them understand a single alphabet, it sometimes takes days together. Whereas for students with poor comprehension skills it can take weeks or even months, and only then is an assessment or reassessment possible, ”she said.

Zahra said, “We create Individualized Educational Programs (IEPs) for a special duration and this requires different tools and techniques based on the potential of the child. “

In Srinagar, nine teachers work for inclusive education, five of whom are special education teachers and four are resource persons.

The resource persons work for the elementary level up to the 8th standard and the teachers in special education work for the secondary level of 9 to 12 classes.

Nazia hurra

Volunteer tutor for CWSN

In an effort to help disabled children, Nazia Hurra did not accept the same fate of being illiterate as her three siblings and became the first in her family to pursue an education.

Hurra, 30, says she wants to help students who need inclusive education to compete with normal students.

Currently, Hurra is a special tutor and teaches at least 20 disabled students in the Bandipora district of northern Kashmir.

“We are three sisters and one brother, and in my family poverty has forced my siblings out of school. However, for me there was no way to step back and accept the same fate as theirs, ”said Hurra.

Originally from Naidkhai Village in Hajin Block of Bandipora District, Hurra said she started doing social work at home helping her specially disabled nephew who was born blind and mentally disabled.

“My journey of helping students with disabilities started at home where I have a blind and mentally disabled nephew. He always wanted to study like normal students and that’s where I started my new journey of helping children with special needs (CWSN), ”she said.

Hurra says her family were worried about her nephew’s education because they had no idea how to write braille for the blind.

“I started working with an NGO, the National Association of the Blind, in which I worked as a volunteer. Later I learned the Braille script on my own. I started working with this NGO as a specialist teacher in the field, ”she said.

Hurra says that initially she identified students who needed inclusive education. “In Bandipora district, I had identified around 20 children who needed inclusive education. I taught them and two of them were selected at Aligarh Special School, ”she said.

“In addition to two other specially disabled students I taught qualified the 10th standard,” she said.

Hurra says that in Jammu and Kashmir, the government as well as private educational institutions lack basic infrastructure.

“There is a need for more special tutors here and more importantly, the infrastructure should be built for the CWSN,” she said.

Javaid ahmed tak

Laureate Padma Shri, godmother of the JK disabled association and special tutor

Almost every two years, a survey is conducted to find out how many Children with Special Needs (CwSN) are enrolled.

“In most districts of Jammu and Kashmir, more than 4000 CWSNs are enrolled in inclusive education,” explains Javaid Ahmad Tak.

He said: “In Jammu and Kashmir, only 58 special education teachers were recruited in 2012. Currently, only around 80 special education teachers are working to teach students with different disabilities.

In a wheelchair, Tak says he’s been associated with the Zeba-Apa Institute for Children with Disabilities since 2006.

“At this institute, over 100 students with disabilities are enrolled and are taught by the special tutors we have hired at Composite Research Center (CRC) Bemina,” Tak said.

Tak has been working as a special tutor since 2006 and has taught over 100 students with different abilities.

Earlier this year, in Nov-08, Tak received the Padma Shri Award from President Ram Nath Kovind in New Delhi.

Tak said the secret behind receiving the Padma Shri Award was the struggle of people with disabilities which inspired him to work for the social good of all those people who sail the same boat.

Recalling the ordeal of two decades ago, Tak said: “On the night of March 21-22, 1997, I was at my uncle’s house and an unknown gunman burst in and shot me in the back in which one of my kidneys, part of the liver, and a spleen were damaged.

Tak received a postgraduate degree in social work from the University of Kashmir.

He said that since then he has been serving people with disabilities and after three years in 2000 he founded an NGO Humanity Welfare Organization Helpline for the welfare of the poor and the disabled.

Umza Majid

Special educator at the Baramula School for the Blind

Uzma Majid was only 21 years old when she decided to devote her services to serving children with disabilities.

Posted at a school for the blind in Baramulla district, north Kashmir, Uzma says she has been working for inclusive education since 2016.

The 27-year-old special tutor, Uzma, said: “I have been working on inclusive education and now I am working in a school for the blind in Baramulla where different types of pupils are enrolled such as the mentally retarded pupils (MR), deaf and dumb pupils and blind pupils respectively. . “

“In the school at least 83 students are enrolled and I teach 8th grade students,” she said.

Originally from the Delina region of Baramulla, Uzma said: “I mainly teach partially blind students using braille writing and in my classroom at least eight of these students are enrolled.


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Judges Napa, Sonoma and Marin from among those selected for the mentorship panel https://abilitiesnetworks.org/judges-napa-sonoma-and-marin-from-among-those-selected-for-the-mentorship-panel/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 19:37:36 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/judges-napa-sonoma-and-marin-from-among-those-selected-for-the-mentorship-panel/ A California judicial mentoring program currently consists of judges from three North Bay counties as well as a judge from Solano County. Napa County Superior Court Judge Monique Langhorne, Sonoma County Judge Chris Honigsberg and Marin County Judge Andrew Sweet will be part of a North Bay task force for the Justice Mentorship Program. State. […]]]>

A California judicial mentoring program currently consists of judges from three North Bay counties as well as a judge from Solano County.

Napa County Superior Court Judge Monique Langhorne, Sonoma County Judge Chris Honigsberg and Marin County Judge Andrew Sweet will be part of a North Bay task force for the Justice Mentorship Program. State. Solano County Judge Christine Carringe will also be in the group, the group said Thursday.

The North Bay Project is a partnership with Gov. Gavin Newsom’s office, which in July launched the Judicial Mentorship Program – which includes sections for appellate and trial courts – to help create a more inclusive justice system.

“The remarkable diversity of our state is a point of pride and strength that I am committed to advancing at all levels of state government,” Newsom said in the statement. “This mentorship program supports our efforts to identify the best and brightest judicial candidates from across the state, contributing to a stronger, more inclusive bench to better serve all Californians.”

Judges serving in the North Bay Regional Collaboration will communicate with all sectors of the legal community, including bar associations, nonprofit legal organizations, local firms and independent practitioners, to support lawyers considering legal action. sit in local courts of first instance. The program will strive to identify and provide forensic mentors to these attorneys, and provide information on the judicial appointment process, answer questions about the nomination and verification, and make recommendations to improve suitability for the legal profession. nomination.

“The process of applying, reviewing and ultimately selecting a judge can be cumbersome and intimidating,” Langhorne said in the statement. “Our goal is to help qualified individuals interested in assuming the seat of the Headquarters Officer, both as a support resource and as a mentor, as they navigate the judicial nomination process. In doing so, we will work collaboratively to encourage a diverse group of applicants to pursue public service through the state justice system. “

A native of Vallejo, Langhorne served Napa County in Child Support Services and the District Attorney’s Office before becoming County Court Commissioner in 2006, overseeing matters such as restraining orders, custody of children, misdemeanor indictments, drug court and traffic violations. She was appointed to the Napa County bench in 2018 by the government of the day. Jerry Brown and was elected to a full four-year term as a judge in March 2020.

Honigsberg was appointed in February 2018, filling a vacancy created by the retirement of Judge Elliot Daum. He previously served as the Assistant District Attorney in Sonoma County.

The 38-year-old when he was selected for the bench, Petaluma’s Honigsberg was the youngest person in recent history to join the 20-member bench.

Sweet was appointed a judge in 2009. He received his bachelor’s degree from the University of California, Berkeley and his law degree from the University of San Francisco School of Law.

The Democratic Press contributed to this report.


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Mentoring memories: Spokane woman believes time spent with girls is a gift https://abilitiesnetworks.org/mentoring-memories-spokane-woman-believes-time-spent-with-girls-is-a-gift/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 08:09:08 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/mentoring-memories-spokane-woman-believes-time-spent-with-girls-is-a-gift/ Gifts of childhood time touched the life of Mary Carpenter, Spokane Clinic Supervisor, author and single mother. Carpenter, 45, has sought to advance these gifts over the past nine years by mentoring girls she met through her daughter’s school, counselors and church. Some children have moved, but today she mentors seven girls between the ages […]]]>

Gifts of childhood time touched the life of Mary Carpenter, Spokane Clinic Supervisor, author and single mother.

Carpenter, 45, has sought to advance these gifts over the past nine years by mentoring girls she met through her daughter’s school, counselors and church. Some children have moved, but today she mentors seven girls between the ages of 13 and 17, many of whom live in low-income households or with foster families.

She seeks to provide them with community experiences, including opportunities to meet in the park, write letters to residents of an assisted living facility and see the Christmas lights. She asked them for tickets to the theater and ballets and to Green Bluff. During her childhood years in Michigan, a Christian author did the same for her and a few other girls in a ministry where her father worked.

“Nancy DeMoss (Wolgemuth), writer and radio host, actually used to take the girls out of the ministry once a year and take us to a play and dinner, and then she would make us sit down and think about it. : ‘What are our goals for the future?’ Carpenter said.

“She would really spend time talking and investing in our lives. It had such an impact on me, and I thought, someday, I want to do it. She was a great role model. “

At the same time, her parents, Kenneth and Rachel Carpenter, have long served as role models of service, sacrifice and giving, she said. They have volunteered as Union Gospel Mission chaplains, served with Hospice, and helped neighbors and others through the church. Carpenter credits the domino effect for giving rather than everything she’s done.

“I think every one of us in life has had someone who spoke kind words to encourage us at a crucial time,” she said.

Carpenter moved to Spokane from South Carolina nine years ago to be close to his family. Her daughter started school at South Pines Elementary, where Carpenter volunteered and began asking questions about families or children in difficulty. Today, she says that such needs often find her and that she is now able to give more.

Her daily job is as a supervisor at the Spokane Educational Health Clinic, helping to supervise staff and provide training. With a background in psychology and management, she previously worked for Hospice as a coordinator and manager of volunteers. At the clinic, she is part of a management team for the facility that includes family medicine, internal medicine, a psychiatric residency, infectious disease physicians and an obstetrics clinic.

As an author, she is also one of the artists selected for the 2021 Spokane Arts Grant Awards, specifically a $ 10,000 grant for a book and teaching project. Carpenter helps create “Ponies in the Park,” a picture book with a story written by her and illustrated by artist, author and former educator Mary Pat Kanaley. The book, which teaches children about the sculptures and history of Riverfront Park, is due out April 1 with preorders on poneysinthepark.com.

“It’s a sweet little story about how moonlight mixed with magical dust brings the Carousel and all the art of the park to life,” Carpenter said. “It’s a magical story that teaches.”

She said part of the grant money will go to donate a book to every second-grade teacher in the area, and then a book will also go to every elementary school library to help teach children and children. interested in art and history in Spokane. .

On numerous trips to Riverfront Park over the years with her daughter, and also bringing many girls she mentored, Carpenter loved to make up stories with them based on these visits. It helped inspire the book, she said, but Carpenter also winks at her father.

“It was the many hours he spent making up stories with me that developed my interest and my ability to create stories,” she said. “He used to start a story and leave it in a certain place, then keep me going. We would trade intermittently in this process. It was a tradition that I also carried on with my daughter and sometimes the girls that I mentored, when they were young, of course.

“My daughter and I, along with my lovely daughters, have spent many hours venturing into Riverfront Park over the years. We have many fond memories of ice skating, riding the merry-go-round, picnicking and exploring this beautiful park. Riverfront has fond memories of me.

She also has a story about the importance of giving Christmas as a child. In that first nonprofit, Life Action Ministries, where her father and Wolgemuth held roles, Carpenter’s family lived off the support given to her by giving to people, she said. One Christmas when she was around 7, the family was on a tight budget for gifts.

“My parents knew a family that had urgent needs and they were struggling to meet basic needs,” Carpenter said. “We got together as a family and my parents shared the needs of the other family. “

Her parents wanted each family member to think about whether to spend their own budget on gifts or use that money for the other family for Christmas. Each member of the family was allowed to weigh because if he decided to help, all of the Carpenter family would sacrifice themselves.

“The decision was unanimous. We would do without Christmas to support the other family. Well, it is only by giving that you can receive more than you already have.

“We have given anonymously to this family to meet their needs, but in an incredible turn of events, God has given us Christmas as well. Much to our amazement, we were blessed with a surprise bag of gifts left at our doorstep. Someone had bought gifts for each of us children. We will never know who this gentle and generous person was who blessed us in this way.

Carpenter said she would never forget the doll named Mandy with brown hair and a little yellow gingham dress in this Christmas sack, nor her enthusiasm for God’s provision. It grew her faith and strengthened her desire to invest in the lives of others, she added.

Watching the unexpected power of this over the years, Carpenter said she believes there is no greater joy in life than giving. “I think Winston Churchill said it best.” We make a living by what we get. We make a living by what we give. “


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Five years of mentoring support https://abilitiesnetworks.org/five-years-of-mentoring-support/ Thu, 16 Dec 2021 05:40:54 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/five-years-of-mentoring-support/ Intandem supports young people on probation We all need consistent relationships and trust. For young people who have caregiving experience, these relationships can sometimes be lacking. The long-term presence of a trusted and supportive adult can make all the difference in the trajectory of their life. We are celebrating five years of Intandem, Scotland’s national […]]]>

Intandem supports young people on probation

We all need consistent relationships and trust. For young people who have caregiving experience, these relationships can sometimes be lacking. The long-term presence of a trusted and supportive adult can make all the difference in the trajectory of their life.

We are celebrating five years of Intandem, Scotland’s national mentoring program. Funded by the Scottish Government and implemented by Inspiring Scotland, the program connects young people and volunteer mentors to build meaningful, supportive and lasting relationships.

Since 2016, Intandem has been supporting young people kept at home on probation (CSO). While being in care is often linked to social disadvantage, children and young people in home care have the lowest scores of all young people in Scotland, through no fault of their own. intandem helps these young people develop positive relationships with a trusted adult role model. Weekly mentoring provides a space for these relationships to flourish.

Intandem is a community mentoring program, with meetings taking place outside of the school environment. Over the past five years, Intandem has trained 733 volunteers and coordinated 450 games. With over 3,500 children and young people in Scotland currently living at home as part of a CSO, it is essential that we continue to invest in them with mentoring support, so that these children do not fall through the cracks. net.

We know that work in tandem. The average match lasts 17 months, providing the youngsters with long-term stability and support. Youth mentees consistently report a range of positive results, including improved self-esteem (62%), increased community engagement (64%), and better friendships (64%). With Covid-19 causing increased feelings of anxiety and isolation, it’s more crucial than ever that all young people have the opportunity to form meaningful relationships.

With Intandem, Inspiring Scotland is committed to helping Scotland #Keep the promise, a commitment to incorporating the voices of young people with experience in care when making decisions about the Scottish care system. As part of this commitment, intandem is organizing a Youth Forum, where young people with experience in care can express themselves on the problems closest to them. The intandem staff are also currently working with an experienced caregiver, to help shape the intandem work as we look to the future.

intandem is made possible by the commitment of its funder, the Scottish Government. It also depends on the dedication of volunteers and the commitment of the program’s 12 charitable partners, who work tirelessly to coordinate matches across Scotland. These charities are committed to matching more young people with mentors, to ensure that every young person has the opportunity to thrive.

Intandem has a bold and ambitious vision – that the children, youth and families of Scotland can stay together to build and maintain positive and loving relationships. intandem is currently established in 19 local communities and aims to develop even further.

As we continue to grow, Intandem can help Scotland #KeepThePromise to all experienced infants, children, adolescents, adults and their families – may every child grow up loved, safe and respected, able to reach their full potential.

Julia Abel is Head of Development and Partnerships at Inspiring Scotland



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PRH Selects Eight New Writers For WriteNow Mentorship Program https://abilitiesnetworks.org/prh-selects-eight-new-writers-for-writenow-mentorship-program/ Wed, 15 Dec 2021 08:48:45 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/prh-selects-eight-new-writers-for-writenow-mentorship-program/ Posted on December 15, 2021 by Sian bayley Eight new writers have been chosen to join this year’s Penguin Random House UK WriteNow mentorship program, with a focus on writers for children. … Eight new writers have been chosen to join this year’s Penguin Random House UK WriteNow mentorship program, with a focus on writers […]]]>

Eight new writers have been chosen to join this year’s Penguin Random House UK WriteNow mentorship program, with a focus on writers for children.

Work in progress ranges from a powerful and uplifting picture book about a non-binary child entering a new school, to a dark and magical Victorian adventure and fun storytelling for middle school students.

Over the next 12 months, the authors will work closely with an expert editor in their genre to develop their manuscript and prepare it for publication.

Since WriteNow launched in 2016, 800 writers across the UK and Ireland have been part of the program and around 50 writers have joined the editorial program, of which 15 have already been published or acquired by Penguin Random House printers, including a number published by Penguin Random House Kids. These include Burhana Islam, author of Amazing Muslims Who Changed the World (Puffin) Gareth Peter, author of my dads (Puffin) and Eternal star (Puffin) and Manjeet Mann, author of The passage (Penguin) and Run, rebel (Penguin).

Francesca Dow, Executive Director of Penguin Random House Children’s, said, “Each of these eight new writers shares our mission to spark the imaginations of all readers, and I am delighted to welcome them to the WriteNow editorial program. WriteNow is all about giving writers the tools and information they need to take the next step in their authoring journey, and it’s one of the ways we’re working to open up our publishing and industry. at large with under-represented voices, as well as initiatives such as the first Jericho Prize, and others.

Louisa Burden-Garabedian, Creative Responsibility Manager at Penguin Random House UK, added: “It has been a pleasure working on WriteNow this year, and we are delighted to welcome eight amazing new writers to the editorial program this year. We’ve learned a lot by reducing our focus to make sure we reach as many children’s writers as possible, so we’ll be looking to build on that for next year as WriteNow continues to evolve.

This year’s writers include Ben Williams (photo, top) a queer and mixed race writer of Afro-Caribbean descent, currently working on Grace Weaver and the Other Kingdom, a mid-level fantasy about a black girl from east London fighting a police state wielding magic, and Chloe Lewis, who is working on her book The Dragon, the Princess and the Prince, a mid-level adventure about a girl with dragon scales, an autistic animal-loving princess and a prince with a terrible secret.

Lewis is an autistic writer with a passion for seeing more disabled characters in all kinds of fiction. “I think the publishing world can seem very intimidating and mechanical at times. Programs like WriteNow show under-represented voices that our stories matter and help them be heard, ”she said.

Truly Johnston (to the right) currently works in the public sector supporting volunteerism and civil society organizations. His book, Corrine and the Democonch, is an intermediate-level magical realism novel intended for ages 9 and up. “It’s wonderful to have had someone read my work and see the potential in it. It gave me a much needed boost of confidence! ” she said.

Emma Hewitt is an actress and playwright whose stories often focus on gender, power and personal relationships; sometimes with a dystopian or fantastic touch. His dark and magical Victorian adventure, titled Drury Lane Theater, tells the story of an orphan raised in a theater who discovers that she has the power to enter the world of plays by performing. Hannah Stephenson is a North West-based writer who conducts creative writing and poetry workshops for children in elementary schools and arts communities. She was shortlisted for the Writing review Picture Book Prize in 2020 and won the Southport Writers’ Circle International Poetry Competition in 2019. His book Laziness sleeps is a loud, rhyming picture book about teamwork and not giving up.

Lucy Tandon Copp has spent the past 10 years writing for newspapers, magazines and newspapers. Her picture book is set in the Malaysian jungle and follows a talking orangutan and a very smelly durian in a fun story of cunning and self-preservation. She said, “I applied to WriteNow to shine a light on the amazing culture, people, animals and environment of Southeast Asia. Growing up there were few stories in my childhood library that thoughtfully resonated with my own heritage and mixed experiences or celebrated the absolute treasure trove of natural beauty and wonder that Southeast Asia has to. to offer. If I could bring stories like these to life for kids today, it would be a dream come true. “

Matthew Peter-Carter is a writer, actor-musician, and children’s educator. He is the Creative Director of Book Club Bunch, actor-run book clubs for children in schools or after-school clubs with the goal of educating, entertaining and inspiring the love of independent reading. His book Arthur saves Christmas is a fun seasonal adventure for intermediate level fans The Noëlaurus and Matt Haig.

The latest writer is Tuks, a non-binary Italian-British parent of one. They have a passion for copying and editing, freelance and article writing. Their picture book Them focuses on the first day of non-binary child Arlo at a new school. It is a story “about the alliance and how we can do more to intervene and defend others”.


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Valley News – Claremont man known for supervising children accused of child pornography https://abilitiesnetworks.org/valley-news-claremont-man-known-for-supervising-children-accused-of-child-pornography/ Mon, 13 Dec 2021 02:18:07 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/valley-news-claremont-man-known-for-supervising-children-accused-of-child-pornography/ Valley Correspondent Posted: 12/12/2021 21:16:10 PM Modified: 12/12/2021 21:15:34 PM BURLINGTON – A 34-year-old man from Claremont known for his efforts to mentor children in the Twin States has been arrested for a felony of producing child pornography, aka child pornography, in Windsor County, Vermont federal officials say . Wayne Miller, formerly of Hartland, appeared […]]]>

Valley Correspondent

Posted: 12/12/2021 21:16:10 PM

Modified: 12/12/2021 21:15:34 PM

BURLINGTON – A 34-year-old man from Claremont known for his efforts to mentor children in the Twin States has been arrested for a felony of producing child pornography, aka child pornography, in Windsor County, Vermont federal officials say .

Wayne Miller, formerly of Hartland, appeared briefly in Burlington U.S. District Court via video from the Southern State Correctional Facility in Springfield, Vermont on Friday afternoon. He was taken into custody without bail.

A prosecutor wrote in court documents that “the criminal complaint establishes instances where Miller sexually assaulted a toddler he knew, and he videotaped the abuse.”

If convicted of the charge, Miller faces a mandatory minimum of 15 years in prison.

Miller “is the founder and director of Living Proof Mentoring, a program that connects black mentors for black youth in Vermont,” according to a 2020 post on Mentor Vermont social media.

The Vermont Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force found at least three photographs in an email account on Miller’s cell phone, depicting sexual abuse involving a young child and a man’s lower body, according to a court affidavit .

Miller told investigators he was the man in the photographs, wrote Special Agent Scott Labor of Homeland Security Investigations.

The charges date back to June 2020, when Miller lived at 87 Depot Road in Hartland; He moved from Windsor County ahead of a planned raid on his home this month, records show.

Law enforcement finally raided his apartment at 132 Chestnut St. in Claremont on Wednesday.

During the raid, Miller told investigators they would find child sexual abuse material in his email account on his cell phone, court records show.

Vermont law enforcement is renaming child pornography as “child sexual abuse material” and referring to it by the initials – CSAM.

During the hearing, Assistant U.S. Attorney Barbara Masterson requested that Miller be detained on the grounds that he posed both a significant danger to the community and a serious risk of absconding.

“He has an obvious sexual interest in children, and he acted accordingly,” Masterson wrote in his request for detention.

She said there were also concerns for Miller’s “precarious mental health.” Miller “recently checked in to the hospital due to his depression and suicidal thoughts.” He was released from the hospital on Wednesday and was housed that evening at Springfield Jail.

His initial court appearance “had to be delayed because he was under suicide watch at the facility. The government is gravely concerned that Miller will self-harm if he is released, ”Masterson wrote.

Trial judge Kevin Doyle approved the detention, also citing the weight of evidence and Miller’s criminal history, the records show. Doyle has set a probable cause hearing for December 22.

The investigation began when Google sent a cyber tip to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in November 2020 after discovering that a user had attempted to email the material to another account. NCMEC forwarded the e-advice to Vermont Internet Task Force Commander Matt Raymond.

The Vermont task force has obtained search warrants for the two Google accounts involved in the transfer attempt. Through this work, investigators uncovered additional footage, some of which appeared to have been produced by Miller, and learned that the accused likely controlled both accounts, court records show.

Mike Donoghue can be contacted at vermontnewsfirst@gmail.com.


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