Child mentoring – Abilities Networks http://abilitiesnetworks.org/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 16:20:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-4.png Child mentoring – Abilities Networks http://abilitiesnetworks.org/ 32 32 AOE supports summer programs, mentoring for Afghan students https://abilitiesnetworks.org/aoe-supports-summer-programs-mentoring-for-afghan-students/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 16:20:16 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/aoe-supports-summer-programs-mentoring-for-afghan-students/ Vermont Business Magazine The Vermont Agency of Education has committed $200,000 to support two national refugee nonprofit organizations operating in Vermont to ensure refugee students and their families have access to summer programs and community mentoring. AOE will also leverage an existing partnership with the WIDA Consortium to provide targeted professional learning opportunities for teachers […]]]>

Vermont Business Magazine The Vermont Agency of Education has committed $200,000 to support two national refugee nonprofit organizations operating in Vermont to ensure refugee students and their families have access to summer programs and community mentoring. AOE will also leverage an existing partnership with the WIDA Consortium to provide targeted professional learning opportunities for teachers serving Afghan students and other multilingual newcomers.

“This grant and teacher training addresses the immediate need to welcome Afghan newcomers to Vermont with high-quality, culturally appropriate educational services,” said Secretary of Education Dan French. “We’re leveraging the warm welcome offered by local schools to engage these students and their families in the education system and demonstrate all that their new Vermont communities have to offer.

In late 2021, Vermont welcomed its first Afghan families as part of Operation Allies Welcome, the federal government’s effort to support vulnerable Afghans as they resettle safely in the United States. As of spring 2022, Vermont is now home to over 100 school-aged Afghan children with more families expected to arrive in summer 2022.

OCWA will use $200,000 in federal Elementary-Secondary School Emergency Relief (ESSER) funds to create the Afghan Refugee Partnership Grant, which aims to overcome the unique barriers faced by these students and their families and enable them to engage more effectively in their new schools. and communities. The Ethiopian Community Development Council and the US Committees for Refugees and Immigrants are the grant recipients, each receiving $100,000 (see: Afghan Refugee Partnership Grant Activities).

OCWA is also working closely with the Social Services Agency, State Office for Refugees to align efforts and target an additional $200,000 received through the federal initiative Afghan Refugee School Impact: Support to Schools to school districts and/or community partners.

In the summer of 2022, AOE will offer two training opportunities for Vermont teachers serving Afghan students and other newcomers through the WIDA Consortium. An online workshop on engaging multilingual newcomers will be offered to classroom teachers, with a more in-depth version to follow for language specialists.

23.06.2022. MONTPELIER, Vt. – Vermont Education Agency website

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Thieves Target Louisville Youth Mentorship Building, Steal Autographed Jerseys https://abilitiesnetworks.org/thieves-target-louisville-youth-mentorship-building-steal-autographed-jerseys/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 22:35:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/thieves-target-louisville-youth-mentorship-building-steal-autographed-jerseys/ The DELTA Foundation, a youth mentorship program, works tirelessly to spread positivity in the Louisville community. That’s why Deputy Director Jason Scrubb was disheartened when someone broke into their apartment building on Portland Avenue on Saturday as the center held an awareness event. Thieves ransacked the building and stole several items, including cash, clothing and […]]]>

The DELTA Foundation, a youth mentorship program, works tirelessly to spread positivity in the Louisville community. That’s why Deputy Director Jason Scrubb was disheartened when someone broke into their apartment building on Portland Avenue on Saturday as the center held an awareness event. Thieves ransacked the building and stole several items, including cash, clothing and shoes that the foundation donates to children in need, and sports memorabilia intended to inspire young people to pursue their athletic dreams. a jersey autographed by John Wall,” Scrubb said. Jay Scrubb, who plays for the Clippers, is the 21-year-old son of the youth leader. The suspected burglars left a mess for Scrubb and his team to clean up, including including the empty shadow boxes where the jerseys hung on the wall. But the crime itself is what Scrubb said stung the most. “I think it was more hurtful than anything else,” a- “We try to be a beacon here for positivity, so it hurts to see these things happen, but that won’t stop anything, we’ll keep doing what we’re doing.” is on social media and filed a police report to hopefully find out who is responsible.” We’ve had a lot of support on this with a lot of people we’ve helped in the past here in this community and outside the community who said we would spread the word, we’ll see what information we po let’s get it,” he said. But, just like in sports, with every defeat there is a lesson. “We’ve faced some things, and we’ve always overcome, so that’s another challenge we have,” Scrubb said. As for the burglar, Scrubb says their actions won’t dim the light. of the organization or its mission.” Nothing should ever be taken, stolen or vandalized here, we have a great group of people with big hearts. and if you need anything, just knock on the door and ask he said. The DELTA Foundation is offering a reward for information about the burglary. ry.

The DELTA Foundation, a youth mentorship program, works tirelessly to spread positivity in the Louisville community.

That’s why Deputy Director Jason Scrubb was disheartened when someone broke into their apartment building on Portland Avenue on Saturday as the center held an awareness event.

Thieves ransacked the building and stole several items, including cash, clothes and shoes that the foundation donates to children in need, and sports memorabilia meant to inspire young people to pursue their sporting dreams.

“Among the things taken were autographed jerseys, one being a Jay Scrubb jersey and a John Wall autographed jersey,” Scrubb said.

Jay Scrubb, who plays for the Clippers, is the young leader’s 21-year-old son.

The suspected burglars left a mess for Scrubb and his team to clean up, including the empty shadow boxes where the jerseys hung on the wall.

But the crime itself is what Scrubb said stung the most.

“I think it was more hurtful than anything,” he said. “We’re trying to be a beacon here for positivity, so it hurts to see these things happen, but that won’t stop anything, we’ll keep doing what we’re doing.”

The foundation took to social media and filed a police report to hopefully find out who is responsible.

“We’ve had a lot of support on this with a lot of people we’ve helped in the past here in this community and outside of the community who have said we’re going to spread the word, we’ll see what information we can get” , he said.

But, just like in sports, with every defeat there is a lesson.

“We’ve faced some things, and we’ve always overcome, so that’s another challenge we have,” Scrubb said.

As for the burglar, Scrubb says their actions will not dim the organization’s light or its mission.

“Nothing should ever be taken, stolen or vandalized here, we have a great group of people with big hearts and if you need anything just knock on the door and ask,” he said.

The DELTA Foundation is offering a reward for information about the burglary.

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NFP President tasks Kaduna elders with mentoring youth https://abilitiesnetworks.org/nfp-president-tasks-kaduna-elders-with-mentoring-youth/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 15:56:32 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/nfp-president-tasks-kaduna-elders-with-mentoring-youth/ The President of the Pentecostal Fellowship of Nigeria, Kaduna State Chapter, Apostle Emmanuel Bako met over the weekend with Kafanchan elders to make proclamations that would change the tides in South Kaduna. The punch reports that the meeting, which was labeled “Just Before We Go”, was called to redefine the next generation so they could […]]]>

The President of the Pentecostal Fellowship of Nigeria, Kaduna State Chapter, Apostle Emmanuel Bako met over the weekend with Kafanchan elders to make proclamations that would change the tides in South Kaduna.

The punch reports that the meeting, which was labeled “Just Before We Go”, was called to redefine the next generation so they could create an impact that would outlive the older generation and reverse age-old curses in the land.

Addressing the meeting, Apostle Bako said the purpose of the meeting was to change the status quo where parents in the country, who might have survived their youth, did not see the need to leave a good basis on which their children could build.

He lamented why the elderly were reluctant to make statements and proclamations that would speak of the existence of a new society, children and grandchildren.

Bako, who is the founder of Power-Based Church in Kafanchan, encouraged them to ensure that they build and create a family, community and regional tree of existence so that the younger generations can connect to it and benefit from it. , even after they must have passed away from life.

The organizer also appealed to the older generation of the country to make sure to teach their children the history where they came from so that they also pass it on to future generations.

While emphasizing the need for parents to continue pronouncing and declaring blessings upon their children regardless of the circumstances, Apostle Bako explained that it will create a bright future for them.

The meeting, which was attended by a good number of elders from across the country, resolved to begin making positive statements as they renewed their commitment to guide their children in making decisions that would secure their future.

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Florida to launch mentorship programs to boost parenting skills for dads https://abilitiesnetworks.org/florida-to-launch-mentorship-programs-to-boost-parenting-skills-for-dads/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/florida-to-launch-mentorship-programs-to-boost-parenting-skills-for-dads/ Florida is preparing to launch mentoring and outreach programs aimed at boosting parenting skills for fathers and, in turn, helping at-risk youth as part of a $70 million initiative. The initiative was included in a new law (HB 7065) unanimously approved this year by the Legislative Assembly and signed by Governor Ron DeSantis in April. […]]]>

Florida is preparing to launch mentoring and outreach programs aimed at boosting parenting skills for fathers and, in turn, helping at-risk youth as part of a $70 million initiative.

The initiative was included in a new law (HB 7065) unanimously approved this year by the Legislative Assembly and signed by Governor Ron DeSantis in April. Some state agency heads appeared at a press conference on Tuesday, June 14 to tout the efforts, which DeSantis said comes as the country faces a “fatherhood crisis.”

A significant portion of the money will go towards expanding mentorship programs for young people and funding grants designed to help fathers.

Juvenile Justice Department Secretary Eric Hall said providing fathers with resources and improving youth outcomes go hand-in-hand, in part because about half of the children who interact with Hall’s department come from of single-parent households.

“Unfortunately, at the Department of Juvenile Justice, we see too many of our young people coming from single-parent homes,” Hall told reporters. “What we’re looking at is how do you engage fathers who have the ability to be more engaged than they are, or in some cases, how do you get male role models in the absence of a father?”

Hall said increasing education opportunities is also a big part of the measure, which provides the Department of Juvenile Justice with $3.7 million to help support access to post-secondary education.

“The one thing we know is that if we can bridge the academic gaps and put them on the path to post-secondary education and training and get a degree that helps them achieve their goals and dreams, it’s This is how we change their life trajectory and their families,” Hall said.

Some of the grants funded by the act will be aimed at helping fathers find jobs and pay child support, in what Hall described as a “holistic” approach to addressing bigger issues.

Department of Economic Opportunity Secretary Dane Eagle said his agency would help implement parts of the measure, including working with CareerSource Florida and local programs to help non-custodial parents.

“Let’s help non-custodial parents become better fathers and be present. Help them find gainful employment, help them with child support so they can be better fathers and be there,” Eagle said.

Officials described the initiative as requiring extensive collaboration among state agencies. But local organizations will largely determine whether the initiative has an impact.

Florida Department of Corrections Secretary Ricky Dixon stressed the importance of working with local groups to help the thousands of fathers returning home after being incarcerated.

“We release about 8,000 people a year who are fathers,” he said. “So it’s us working to provide the resources and partnering with local communities and faith-based and civic organizations to provide the support structures we need.”

The state Department of Health, meanwhile, is tasked by law with facilitating “engagement activities” for fathers, “such as providing one-on-one support to fathers to increase participation in services that enhance the well-being of the family and the child”.

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The Nehemiah Project Opens Growing Minds Mentoring Center to Help Improve Lives of At-Risk Children https://abilitiesnetworks.org/the-nehemiah-project-opens-growing-minds-mentoring-center-to-help-improve-lives-of-at-risk-children/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 14:12:38 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/the-nehemiah-project-opens-growing-minds-mentoring-center-to-help-improve-lives-of-at-risk-children/ In an effort to positively impact more young people in the area, the non-profit organization Nehemiah Project will launch a new mentorship program in downtown Albemarle this month. Growing Minds Mentoring will target at-risk students ages 8 to 12 primarily from Central Elementary before expanding to include students from other parts of the county. Contacts […]]]>

In an effort to positively impact more young people in the area, the non-profit organization Nehemiah Project will launch a new mentorship program in downtown Albemarle this month.

Growing Minds Mentoring will target at-risk students ages 8 to 12 primarily from Central Elementary before expanding to include students from other parts of the county. Contacts have been made with principals, school counselors and Albemarle’s director of public housing, Dr. Kim Scott, to ensure that Nehemiah will target students who will benefit most from the program.

“The goal of Growing Minds is that if we pour into these children, much like a plant, and they get the right nutrients, the right nutrition, the love and care, they will become what they were born to be. created,” said Paul. Peters, executive director and founder of Nehemiah Project.

Growing Minds, which will be free to the public, is in a facility owned by Central United Methodist Church at 108 E. North St., Albemarle, and will be led by Mentor Director Chase Jordan and Nehemiah Director Tony Peek . community initiatives, in addition to Peters. It will be open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday to Thursday starting this summer and will continue until the next school year. He estimates that around 20 to 30 children will be part of the first phase of the program.

“I think this is a great opportunity for our kids,” Superintendent Jarrod Dennis said, noting it will help with learning loss issues, especially during the summer.

The grand opening of the new Growing Minds Mentoring Center in downtown Albemarle took place in late May. Photo courtesy of Christopher Keith.

Nehemiah is trying to raise $50,000 for the mentorship program. If people want to help, he said they can sponsor a child for $100 a week or $700 for the entire summer program.

Growing Minds will incorporate elements of the STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math) curriculum as well as enrichment activities, guest speakers, and field trips. There will also be volunteer opportunities for students to go out into the community and help make a difference.

“We’re trying to teach these kids that it’s important to give back and that it’s important to volunteer,” said Brandi Jordan, board member of the Nehemiah Project, who worked with Peters to launch the program. “In turn, you will raise a new generation that will understand what it means to volunteer and why we should volunteer.

Peters hopes to partner with local high schools to inspire older students to want to serve as mentors for the program.

Growing Minds wants to connect with children from an early age and then continue to mentor them through their careers from K-12, even helping them get into college or find a job once graduates.

“We want to start now with these kids, give them a vision of what their future will look like, and then connect them with the right people to help them get there,” Peters said.

The Nehemiah Project, founded by Peters in 2019, seeks to serve people in six categories: the homeless, those with addictions, veterans, at-risk teens and survivors of domestic violence, the elderly and people with mental health problems.

The new program is an extension of Nehemiah’s ongoing Lunch Buddy program that began before the COVID-19 pandemic and involves a group of volunteers having weekly lunches with more than 20 students each at Central and East Elementary Schools. East.

“I feel like there is a huge need in our community for mentors and strong personalities to support our school children,” said school board member Carla Poplin, who also sits on the Nehemiah board and is volunteered as a lunch buddy. “So when Paul pitched the idea to us, I was obviously excited about my position on the school board and knowing the great post-Covid need due to learning loss that we’re trying to make up for.”

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This mentorship startup is helping students across India achieve their Ivy League dreams https://abilitiesnetworks.org/this-mentorship-startup-is-helping-students-across-india-achieve-their-ivy-league-dreams/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 04:13:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/this-mentorship-startup-is-helping-students-across-india-achieve-their-ivy-league-dreams/ After traveling the world, Princeton graduates and friends Poshak Agarwal and Rahul Subramaniam arrived in India in 2013 and found themselves dragging the children of friends and acquaintances to pay their rent and bills. “One of our mentors sat us down and said, ‘What are you doing? You are sitting on a huge opportunity because […]]]>

After traveling the world, Princeton graduates and friends Poshak Agarwal and Rahul Subramaniam arrived in India in 2013 and found themselves dragging the children of friends and acquaintances to pay their rent and bills.

“One of our mentors sat us down and said, ‘What are you doing? You are sitting on a huge opportunity because no one is exploring mentorship in a professional, process-oriented and personalized way,” Rahul recalls.

In 2013, Poshak and Rahul started Athena Education to help students apply to overseas colleges with a particular focus on Ivy League colleges. They started with their “meager savings” of a bedroom in their Delhi apartment.

“When we counseled these children of friends, we found that they already had counselors, but they still needed help. We realized that there were so many students in India who needed professional help to achieve their Ivy League dreams. But unfortunately that didn’t exist,” Poshak says.

The duo had previously worked with students. In college, they served on the interview committee for admissions. Rahul also served briefly as the director of a college consulting and test prep company in California.

“We started helping them…more students started coming in and slowly the organization grew,” says Poshak.

Today, the startup provides high school students with comprehensive admissions advice to leading US and UK universities from a team of Ivy League graduates. It worked with more 500 students so far.

The startup operates online and offline, depending on the students’ schedule. It currently runs centers in Delhi, Gurugram, Mumbai and Bengaluru.

“When our fellows have more time on their hands, they love being in our office and working with advisors and other specialists. During summer holidays, at least 50-60% of our NCR scholars prefer to be physically present in our learning space at least once a week,” says Poshak.

How it works

The startup offers a personal mentorship program that costs around Rs 4-5 lakh per yearwith students enrolling as early as class 9. In fact, in 2022, they even enrolled 10 students from class 7.

At the beginning of the course, Athena analyzes the student’s interests, passions and abilities, or as the founders like to call it “the student’s ikigai”.

After that, the program pushes students to explore different fields through capstone projects, writing research papers, and AI/ML projects, among others.

Athena then helps students prepare for the SAT, revise and rewrite college applications, and mock interviews.

“We are a one-stop-shop for all student needs. We see it in three parts: strategy, execution and application,” says Poshak.

“There are people who do the applications, or just the strategy, but we do all three. If a student wants to write a research paper, create an application, get an internship or do a robotics project, we will develop a strategy for the student based on our years of experience, with the people who work with us like a former – Admissions officer at Harvard.

“Once the strategy is in place, we work with the student for years to help execute it. Once this is done, we help the student communicate this through a comprehensive application. This execution is what sets us apart.

Each of these activities is managed by different teams. Advisors, students and parents can access a global progress report on the Athena platform. The startup also helps students get internships.

“Over the years, our business model has evolved to become more than academic counseling,” says Rahul.

“It’s like a big buffet. There is strategic advice, tactical advice, emotional advice. We use child psychology experts, admissions officers, our entire in-house research team, a technical team, and art consultants. We have a network of internships and summer schools, and now our research team is also developing relationships with labs so that science-loving students can do hands-on work,” he explains.

The startup connects with students two to three times a week and spends four to five hours a week with them on average.

Shoo-in for the Ivy League?

Three years after its creation, in 2016, Athena made its first breakthrough: seven Indian students entered Harvard. Three of these students were from Athena.

Cut to 2021.

Fifty-six students applied to overseas universities through Athena and all received acceptance letters from prestigious institutes like Columbia, Yale, Stanford, Caltech, Oxford, Cambridge, Dartmouth, Brown, University of California—Los Angeles, University of California—Berkeley, University of Toronto, Imperial, LSE, among others. Among these, 53 students have entered the university of their choice, the startup said.

In 2022, the number of students applying abroad through the startup has increased to 68. The startup has seen 100% of students receive acceptance letters from the Ivy League and other top colleges. In 2022, as much as 97% of students entered the university of their choice.

On average, each student was admitted to five colleges.

Other startups facilitating overseas education for Indian students include Azent Overseas Education, ApplyBoard, EduFund, Leap Scholar, Yocket, Leverage Edu, iSchoolConnect Technologies, and Edumpus.

The startup plans to continue to expand and open more centers in other cities.

“Our goal is clear: to aim for excellent results for our students, to focus on quality of services, to provide our families with access to specialists in all fields and to help scholars become the best versions of themselves- Through a convergence of technology, world-class analytics and a team of specialists, we want to enable many more students to receive a world-class education and become the leaders of tomorrow,” says Rahul .

Edited by Teja Lele Desai
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Steve Young mentoring Trey Lance, who welcomes advice “with open arms” https://abilitiesnetworks.org/steve-young-mentoring-trey-lance-who-welcomes-advice-with-open-arms/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 01:51:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/steve-young-mentoring-trey-lance-who-welcomes-advice-with-open-arms/ Getty Images The 49ers had Hall of Fame quarterbacks Joe Montana and Steve Young winning the Super Bowl for them. Colin Kaepernick and Jimmy Garoppolo led them to the Super Bowl. That became Trey Lance’s charge after the 49ers traded in the 2021 draft to take him No. 3 overall and set […]]]>


Getty Images

The 49ers had Hall of Fame quarterbacks Joe Montana and Steve Young winning the Super Bowl for them. Colin Kaepernick and Jimmy Garoppolo led them to the Super Bowl.

That became Trey Lance’s charge after the 49ers traded in the 2021 draft to take him No. 3 overall and set him up to return to work in 2022.

So Lance seeks all the advice he can get, including from Young. Lance and Young have spoken several times this offseason.

“We have to talk about a decent amount,” Lance said Tuesday, via NBCSportsBayArea.com’s Matt Maiocco. “Obviously a guy like that means the world every time he says anything about me. I have nothing but respect for a guy like that, everything he’s done and have been in this building and playing for this organization.

“For me, I’m going to take everything I can from a guy like that. Everything he has to say, everything he has to offer me, I welcome with open arms.

Young said last week that he had “100% confidence” in Lance’s abilities. Lance is confident in his abilities, and so are the 49ers.

The 49ers are now his team, which gives Lance a lot.



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Mentorship Program Matches “Big” with “Little” https://abilitiesnetworks.org/mentorship-program-matches-big-with-little/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 17:57:13 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/mentorship-program-matches-big-with-little/ Mark B. is a lawyer in New Rochelle, a northern suburb of New York. Tysaun is a 14-year-old from nearby Mount Vernon and is what some would call an ‘at risk’ kid. In September 2021, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Westchester County paired them up, making Mark a “Big” and Tysaun a “Little.” The charity […]]]>

Mark B. is a lawyer in New Rochelle, a northern suburb of New York. Tysaun is a 14-year-old from nearby Mount Vernon and is what some would call an ‘at risk’ kid. In September 2021, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Westchester County paired them up, making Mark a “Big” and Tysaun a “Little.”

The charity is a youth mentoring organization that serves children facing adversity to help them stay in school and away from violence and drugs while helping them to achieve their full potential in life. This mission is accomplished through one-on-one mentoring relationships in a “Big-Little” model that pairs adult volunteers with children ages 7-17.

The majority of these children come from single-parent families and many are in foster care.

“What they really lack is a positive role model,” Rikki Childs, assistant director of the Westchester chapter, told The Epoch Times.

“Some of our little ones, some of our children, come from difficult households, difficult homes. There may be gang violence in their neighborhood; there may be gang violence in their home,” she said, noting that this is why parents seek out the program. “They are looking for someone to get them out of this kind of situation.”

Big Brothers Big Sisters is nothing new; it has existed nationally since 1904 and the Westchester chapter has existed since 1958. What is new is the recent COVID-19 pandemic which shut down the country for months. But that didn’t stop the Westchester chapter from continuing, making 118 new games during that time.

The staff know that playing the best game is what leads to success. If a Big just likes art museums and a Little just likes pro wrestling, they’re not going to be a good match, so the staff does their best to make sure the two have similar interests. However, part of what they do is introduce themselves to topics they may not have considered before.

“Sometimes it doesn’t happen,” said Childs, who has worked for the organization for 17 years. “Sometimes we have three Small and three Big, and they’re not compatible.”

That’s when the staff reaches out to find matches for the unmatched.

“The program requires a meeting commitment of four to six hours a month — or what we like to say is two outings a month — for a commitment of at least a year,” Childs said.

At this point, the couple is asked if they wish to continue.

“The majority of games do. Sometimes we don’t even have to ask,” she said, “because it’s just a natural yes.”

However, on occasion a Big or a Little will be disallowed before a match is even attempted.

In the Mark-Tysaun situation, Mark was looking for ways to support his black community, and Tysaun urgently needed a positive role model. His mother saw his grades decline as he became involved with negative influences in the neighborhood. The match was exactly what they both needed.

Mark knew it would take time to establish a trust-based relationship with Tysaun and didn’t want to come across as a nag when it came to schoolwork, so their first bi-weekly escapades often went out to eat at restaurants, so they could talk.

Tysaun’s mother told the program manager that Mark was exactly the person her son needed in his life and that she really appreciated what he had done so far.

Currently, Westchester has a backlog of female Bigs, waiting to be matched with female Littles. There are about 60 Littles on the waiting list, mostly boys.

Sometimes parents contact Big Brothers Big Sisters themselves; other times they may be referred to the charity by a social worker, doctor or judge. In the event of a shortage of Littles, the organization will carry out its own awareness campaign.

The cost of all activities a pair engages in is borne by the Big. However, the organization emphasizes low-cost or free activities, such as picnics, homework, and arts and crafts.

Right off the bat, games are needed to establish three goals. Program managers follow up to see how far they have come in achieving them.

There have been matches that lasted 10 years. The chapter’s retention rate is currently at 84%, which means pairs continue beyond the one-year commitment 84% of the time.

Nationally, about 98% of Littles do not engage in substance abuse, while 2% do.

“We do a lot of research [with the Littles]”, Childs said, noting that they find “good things and sometimes not so good things,” like experimenting with drugs.

While Big Brothers Big Sisters of Westchester reports to Big Brothers Big Sisters of America, the national office does not fund affiliates. Westchester raises its own funds to operate through grants and donations and actually pays fees to the national office for the use of its databases.

The question every mother asks when enrolling her child is, “When will I have a Big?” Childs finds it difficult to answer this question because there are so many factors in producing a match.

“It’s kind of hard for us to say because we don’t know when this perfect Big is going to come through the door,” she said. “We kind of say, ‘It might take two days, it might take two months, sometimes it might take two years; we just don’t know.

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Dave Paone covers New York.

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Monday Profile: Columbus teacher retires after 25 years of mentoring students and colleagues https://abilitiesnetworks.org/monday-profile-columbus-teacher-retires-after-25-years-of-mentoring-students-and-colleagues/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 15:00:36 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/monday-profile-columbus-teacher-retires-after-25-years-of-mentoring-students-and-colleagues/ At-risk students generally gravitate towards Deborah Pounders. The recently retired Columbus Municipal School District science teacher isn’t sure why. “I’ve never really identified what I have to offer, but they tend to be very comfortable with me,” Pounders said. “I have informally mentored at-risk students throughout my career.” In the 2019-20 school year, “unofficially” became […]]]>

At-risk students generally gravitate towards Deborah Pounders.

The recently retired Columbus Municipal School District science teacher isn’t sure why.

“I’ve never really identified what I have to offer, but they tend to be very comfortable with me,” Pounders said. “I have informally mentored at-risk students throughout my career.”

In the 2019-20 school year, “unofficially” became “officially” for Pounders. She created the “Check and Connect” program at Columbus High School, pairing at-risk students with mentor teachers. Pounders was one of the mentors, participating in a program she designed to not only keep students on track, but also to take pride in their accomplishments.

“We always had a chance to brag about them, and the students didn’t feel like we were just telling them everything they needed to fix,” Pounders said.

The program was one of many Pounders accomplishments in a 25-year career with plenty of mentorship — and not just for students.

With a master’s degree in teacher leadership from Mississippi State, which she earned in 2020, Pounders has made it her mission to help early-career teachers navigate a challenging field. She calls it a “win-win” situation, saying she can benefit from their energy and knowledge of new technologies while helping them avoid burnout, a persistent problem among those in their first five years of teaching.

“I love to see that there are people who are still passionate about getting into the education field because we desperately need it right now,” Pounders said.

His retirement became official at the end of the 2021-22 school year, but Pounders wasn’t done helping. She will transition to part-time consulting for teachers in need of support as well as tutoring students preparing for state biology tests.

“I don’t completely want to be away from the students because that’s what I love most about teaching: my kids,” Pounders said.

Travel the world
Pounders showed this while working in various roles within CMSD. She began her career as a long-term supply teacher before taking up a full-time college teaching position.

From there, she worked eight years at the CMSD Alternative School. Pounders taught science in grades seven and eight, a mixed science-biological science class; physics; human anatomy; and physiology – and even a course in world history.

She said she learned quickly that it was important to be thorough and flexible, but caring about the students was paramount.

Deborah Pounders poses with a sign indicating an equal distance to the equator and the North Pole at Yellowstone National Park in Montana. Pounders took students to Montana to attend the annual HATCH Summit and learn how to test water quality. Photo courtesy of Deborah Pounders

“That was the No. 1 thing: student relations,” Pounders said. “What is personally important to them? What are their goals ? What do they want to do? You can take students anywhere once you know what they’re working on and they know you really care and support them.

In a few cases, “taking students anywhere” took on a literal meaning. In a partnership with the National Science Foundation, Pounders sent students to the University of Maine to train them in water quality assessment. Back in Columbus, they tested the water quality of Magby and Luxapalila creeks.

Pounders has also taken students to Montana, and she was once able to travel to the Australian island state of Tasmania for field research in environmental science as part of Mississippi State’s MSU GK12 INSPIRE program. University.

She said Australia had been “on her bucket list” to visit, but it would have cost a teacher’s salary had the NSF not covered the cost.

“It was an amazing opportunity,” Pounders said. “I always tell students, ‘Education can take you places you didn’t think you could go.'”

come out strong
After more than two decades with CMSD, the 2020-21 school year has taken Pounders to another unfamiliar place: Starkville.

Fresh out of her master’s degree, she left the district for a position at Partnership Middle School, hoping to work with Mississippi State’s new teachers and trainee teachers sent to the school.

But Pounders’ best-laid plans went awry. The COVID-19 pandemic limited in-person instruction, and student teachers at MSU were not even allowed into classrooms.

Pounders said leaving for Starkville made him realize it was time to return to Columbus. CMSD “luckily” had a position in biology open, and she jumped at the chance.

A lifelong Columbus resident who attended Caldwell High School and earned her bachelor’s degree from the Women’s University of Mississippi, Pounders said she’s ready to come home.

“It’s the place that built me, and I feel like I want to continue to help build the community,” she said. “I think the best way to do that is to have a strong education system. If students can get an education, they can do whatever they want.

A strengthening education system — the Mississippi legislature passed a teacher pay raise in March — is part of the reason Pounders chose to retire after the last school year. Her husband Harold is also retiring this year and she wanted to spend time with her mother, four children and three grandchildren.

“I wanted to retire on a good season where I was positive about education and felt like I was leaving the students in a good, positive place,” Pounders said. “I never wanted to be one of those teachers who hang around for too long and everyone’s like, ‘Why hasn’t she retired yet?’

“I wanted to leave on a high note,” she added.

Theo DeRosa reports on Mississippi State sports for The Dispatch. Follow him on Twitter at @Theo_DeRosa.

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Rafa Nadal Academy: How Rafael mentored Casper Ruud and others https://abilitiesnetworks.org/rafa-nadal-academy-how-rafael-mentored-casper-ruud-and-others/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 07:36:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/rafa-nadal-academy-how-rafael-mentored-casper-ruud-and-others/ On Sunday, Rafael Nadal kissed his 14th Roland-Garros trophy after beating a trainee from his own Academy, Casper Ruud. Casper Ruud, the Norwegian player, has played regularly at Roland-Garros and has won eight titles since 2020 on clay. Ruud was previously a trainee at the Rafa Nadal Academy in Manacor, Spain and was also mentored […]]]>

On Sunday, Rafael Nadal kissed his 14th Roland-Garros trophy after beating a trainee from his own Academy, Casper Ruud.

Casper Ruud, the Norwegian player, has played regularly at Roland-Garros and has won eight titles since 2020 on clay. Ruud was previously a trainee at the Rafa Nadal Academy in Manacor, Spain and was also mentored by Rafael Nadal himself.

Giving back to the game, Rafael Nadal founded the Rafa Nadal Academy in Manacor converting his training base into a state-of-the-art facility in 2016. Coach and Rafael’s uncle, Toni Nadal, heads the academy while the Former World No. 1 Carlos Moya is the technical director.

The Rafa Nadal Academy has separate programs for adult and junior players. The academy is home to around 34 tennis courts, including 19 hard courts and seven clay courts and a football pitch in addition to squash courts. The institution also hosts an international school and other facilities to continue the training of trainees during their program at the academy. The academy is also home to the Rafa Nadal Museum where tennis fans can get a glimpse of the tennis icon’s titles.

In 2017, Reuters reported that the average annual fee for “tennis lessons and school” for children was $62,000. The academy opened in 2016.

Like Casper Ruud, the academy has been a finishing center for several rising tennis stars. Casper joined the academy in 2018 when he was ranked over 100 and is now ranked sixth, according to the Association of Tennis Professionals. Iga Świątek, the female world No. 1, also trained at the academy. Jordanian player Abedallah Shelbayh and Hong Kong player Coleman Wong Chak-lam also trained at the academy.

Amazon Prime Video hosted a four-part documentary series about the academy. The academy has training centers in Mexico and Kuwait and will soon inaugurate its third such center in Hong Kong.

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