child coaching – Abilities Networks http://abilitiesnetworks.org/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 21:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-4.png child coaching – Abilities Networks http://abilitiesnetworks.org/ 32 32 Training advice from a pro sends Ely to the final https://abilitiesnetworks.org/training-advice-from-a-pro-sends-ely-to-the-final/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/training-advice-from-a-pro-sends-ely-to-the-final/ Jodi Summit SUDAN — A World Series ring was a nice capstone to a long baseball career for Jack Roddy, and it offered some inspiration last week for local little leaguers.Roddy, a longtime talent scout for the Atlanta Braves, brought his ring and his thoughts on the game to a recent youth baseball practice in […]]]>

Jodi Summit

SUDAN — A World Series ring was a nice capstone to a long baseball career for Jack Roddy, and it offered some inspiration last week for local little leaguers.
Roddy, a longtime talent scout for the Atlanta Braves, brought his ring and his thoughts on the game to a recent youth baseball practice in Sudan. While Roddy’s advice was welcome, it’s the bling that will likely be the most memorable part of the day for young baseball players.
The large diamond ring, encrusted with diamonds, rubies and pearls, engraved in large letters with his last name, is a precious and precious reminder of the Braves’ victory in the 2021 World Series. over $25,000, it’s a keepsake that spends most of its time in a safe, Roddy said. Which made Roddy’s recent appearance all the more special.
As each of the players got a chance to try out the ring, there were big smiles as they struck the classic World Series pose. Roddy also showed players the smallest united gold band in the World Series, designed for regular use.
Roddy retired at the end of the 2021 league season and now lives in Sudan. He grew up in California, but his parents were from the Twin Cities, and they honeymooned on Lake Vermilion in 1948. When he was little, his family bought their own cabin on the lake, and it’s quickly became his “favorite place”. in the world.” He now calls Sudan his home.
“Baseball,” he told the kids, “is all about having fun.”
And when scouting for college and pro teams, figuring out if a player was having fun was an important part of the process.
“They play better if they’re having fun,” he said. “You also want to see a player who hustles 100% of the time, before and during the game.” Other important factors are players who show a positive attitude towards their coaches, in addition to hitting hard and throwing the ball quickly.
Roddy shared this advice with young players, some who will continue playing in high school, but others who will likely end their baseball careers after Little League.
“Play every game like someone is watching you,” he said.
Working with players of that age is what he likes best, he said.
“It’s so much fun,” he said. “The little ones are open to suggestions.”
Roddy worked on throwing form, fielding techniques and other skills during the morning practice session. The kids listened and pitched in and hopefully will show results for the rest of their summer season.
“It’s so much fun helping kids take it to the next level,” he said.
He said he was impressed with Little League coach Nate Dostert.
“He really understands,” he said. “He knows how to coach.”
Dostert’s 11-year-old twin sons were in training and were two of the most attentive during the training session. Dostert learned his coaching skills from his father Greg, a longtime Little League coach in Tower-Sudan who started when his boys were old enough for t-ball and went on to coach Little League a once they have grown up. While Nate has taken over some of the Little League coaching duties, Greg is still in action, running the youth leagues for older players.
“Parents should be involved with their children,” Roddy said. “They should show up to their games and be enthusiastic. Having a parent around is a great advantage. It doesn’t have to be for baseball. Just for whatever interests their child.
Roddy himself has no children.
“My family is the children I helped,” he said. “There are 4,000 children who know me by my first name.” He stays in touch with many of them and has seen them grow both in baseball and in life, going on to successful careers after they are done playing ball.
major league scout
As a scout, Roddy said his career was really about helping children. And sometimes he could see players grow for four years in high school and then four years in college. He mostly scouted players in Southern California.
He graduated from the University of Iowa, then earned a Bachelor of Science degree at Texas A&M. His first job was as a head coach at a high school in Texas, then he coached and played in the Baseball League independent in Kansas City. .
His first scouting job was for the Los Angeles Angels. But then his boss, Dan Cox, was offered a job with the Braves, and Roddy followed him there and spent the rest of his career with that team.
“Scouts don’t want to stand out in a game,” he said, adding that he would never show up to a game wearing a Braves cap.
“In my career, I’ve scouted over 500 kids who have been drafted by a major league team, and many of them have gone on to great careers.”
But Roddy is also proud of the fact that he’s helped many more players who weren’t major league prospects get college scholarships to play ball, as well as signing players to independent league teams.
“There’s a place in college ball for most players,” he said, “but maybe not on very competitive teams.”
Sometimes players who are selected by a major league do not end up with major league careers, but there are other options for those who want to continue playing ball.
“I got a phone call two weeks ago from a player I had scouted who had been scouted by the Red Sox,” he said. “He had just been kicked off the team during spring training. He was 23 and wanted to know what he could do. I got him a spot on an independent league team in Montana.
While retired from his job with the Braves, he continued to scout for select college teams, shadowing players from Minnesota and Wisconsin.
Roddy knows there’s more to life than baseball. There is fishing, of course.
“All I catch is my favorite,” he said. He fishes Vermilion Lake year-round, and now that he’s retired he has more time for this second favorite hobby.
Roddy said he’s willing to give private lessons to any aspiring baseball player in the area. Please contact the Timberjay if you would like to get in touch with him. Roddy said that while he charged for these classes in the past, he now does them on a voluntary basis.

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Brothers share highs and lows of basketball coaching staff – Arkansas Catholic https://abilitiesnetworks.org/brothers-share-highs-and-lows-of-basketball-coaching-staff-arkansas-catholic/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 00:15:09 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/brothers-share-highs-and-lows-of-basketball-coaching-staff-arkansas-catholic/ The coaches lacked experience, but had a lot of passion to teach the little brother’s team Posted: June 23, 2022 By Dwain HebdaLittle Rock Correspondent Dwain Hebda Rookie coaches Fernando and Angel Alvarez, seen here on February 10, rushed to coach younger brother Diego’s fifth-grade boys’ basketball team at St. Theresa’s School in Little Rock. […]]]>

The coaches lacked experience, but had a lot of passion to teach the little brother’s team

Posted: June 23, 2022

Dwain Hebda

Rookie coaches Fernando and Angel Alvarez, seen here on February 10, rushed to coach younger brother Diego’s fifth-grade boys’ basketball team at St. Theresa’s School in Little Rock.

One thing that sets parochial schools apart from all other educational institutions is the sense of family felt by all. And when there are siblings involved — and what Catholic school doesn’t have a few sets around — the bonds that form can never be broken.

That’s exactly what Fernando Alvarez got into when he volunteered to coach college basketball at St. Theresa School in Little Rock last season. Alvarez, a graduate of the school, has many fond memories of representing the Cougars.

“I played basketball and football from grade six to eight. I loved it,” Fernando said. “(Sport) is what we looked forward to as kids.”

When younger brother Diego started fifth grade last year, Alvarez, 27, who works for his family’s La Hacienda Mexican restaurant, saw a unique opportunity to share the field with his brother.

“I felt really happy that they were helping me and other people learn the sport. We learned a lot about the game, a lot about what to do, a lot about the rules.

“I love being involved in school,” he said. “I am on the Diocesan Board of Education and have been connected through Catholic schools through that. When the opportunity to coach came up, I just thought it would be something I could do to contribute and have a good time.

Fernando, the eldest of five brothers, had plenty of enthusiasm but lacked experience, having never officially coached a youth team before. So he reached out to another of his siblings, Angel, for an extra pair of hands. Together they embarked on an adventure with 10 fifth-grade boys, most of whom are dribbling a basketball in an organized competition for the first time.

“We wanted it to be a lot of fun, just a lot of laughs at all the stupid mistakes we’ve all made,” Fernando said. “No one really knew what was going on. It was just a fun experience.

“And at the same time, it was hard because I know I have to teach them all these things. It was a bit overwhelming. But I was like, ‘You know what? We’re just going to take this step one step at a time, and I’m sure we’ll figure it out.

Looking at 11-year-old Diego, it’s clear his game has been sharpened by having older brothers. In fact, Alvarado’s basketball games are legendary, Fernando said. Despite the sibling rivalry, Diego said he was delighted to have his brothers on the sidelines.

“I felt really happy that they were helping me and other people learn the sport. We learned a lot about the game, a lot about what to do, a lot about the rules,” a- he declared.

“He seemed to enjoy it,” Fernando said. “When the opportunity (to coach) came up, he was the first to say to me, ‘You should be our coach.’ I was like, ‘You know what? Maybe I should.'”

On the face of it, the team had its share of growing pains, posting a 2-6 record. But that doesn’t tell the whole story. Many games were close competitions, and with each passing week the team grew more confident in their abilities, as did their rookie coaches.

“This season I’ve learned that every kid is different,” Fernando said. “They all respond to different forms of communication. Some like you to show them things, some learn verbally, some are more sensitive and don’t like being called into practice. Learning to treat each child for who they are personally is something that I grew up in a lot.

In the postseason tournament, the Cougars faced a team destined for the tournament finals and gave them everything they could handle. Although ultimately losing (by just five points), the team played exceptionally well, capped off by Diego nailing a 3-point field goal at the buzzer. It was a small win, but it ended the season on an exciting note.

“It was fun all year; everything went very well,” said Diego. “I will absolutely play next year.”

“Angel and I just wanted to help kids grow into young men,” Fernando said. “Through sport you can learn a lot about yourself, learn not to let go, not to give up on yourself. You are going to make mistakes; you just have to overcome them. Learning together as a team, we all grow together.

“That last game was the highlight of our season. It proved to the kids that you can never give up. You just have to do your best and fight until the end. »


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Kids Coach Kids: Blue Jays lead youth soccer programs – Jamestown Sun https://abilitiesnetworks.org/kids-coach-kids-blue-jays-lead-youth-soccer-programs-jamestown-sun/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/kids-coach-kids-blue-jays-lead-youth-soccer-programs-jamestown-sun/ A group of 10 Blue Jay football players have reason to smile for at least an hour every Tuesday and Thursday night. “I became a coach because I like being around the game,” said Connor Traut. “I wanted to impact the development of these young kids in hopes of making them the best players possible. […]]]>

A group of 10 Blue Jay football players have reason to smile for at least an hour every Tuesday and Thursday night.

“I became a coach because I like being around the game,” said Connor Traut. “I wanted to impact the development of these young kids in hopes of making them the best players possible. I also love seeing the smiles and the general love they have for the game.

“One thing I love about training these young kids is how pure they are – they never fail to make you smile or laugh.”

Traut and three other Blue Jay Boys football players, Dylan Altringer, Brady Harty and Cashton Bollinger, have been tasked with the challenge of coaching Jamestown Soccer Club’s U8 youth football team.

Peyton Waliser, Hannah Murchie, Claire Frohlich, Liv Frohlich, Reece Christ and Olivia Sorlie – all members of the Blue Jay girls’ varsity soccer team – coach U6 female soccer players.

“A big part of what we train them is controlling the ball and playing with their teammates,” Frohlich said. “This experience has taught me to be more patient, I have to remember that they are small and very excited.

“It’s just fun working with the kids, I love seeing how excited they are to be there and they’re not afraid to be awkward with us, which makes it really fun. Would love to keep coaching when I return for the summer.”

Liv Frohlich, standing, and Peyton Waliser, leaning, are two high school soccer players from Jamestown who are helping coach young kids this summer.

John M. Steiner / The Jamestown Sun

The concept of high school students responsible for teaching the fundamentals of the game is relatively new. Most current high school students only remember being coached by Jamestown University students, parents, or football coaches.

“When Brady (Harty) was a kid, we were in Bismarck at the time and there were college kids from the University of Mary coaching him,” said JHS boys’ head coach Brandi Harty. “When I was in Jamestown for college, we helped out a bit with the youth programs, but I don’t think the high school kids helped out as much as they do now. It varies from club to club. ‘other.”

Harty said Jamestown Youth Football Club has changed over the past two years as the club no longer has the same director of training – a change which has given more opportunities to Blue Jay football players from s ‘imply.

Harty said if players have a desire to continue coaching, they can continue and earn their E license, which would allow them to coach at a higher level as they gain experience.

To coach at the youth level, Harty said there is no absolute qualification except that the coaches of the kids have played and understand the fundamentals of the game.

“The goal is to catch them when they’re younger and they find it interesting and that’s something they pursue going forward,” Harty said. “They really enjoy working with these kids and seeing how well they do at the end of the session.

“The boys have some feedback from the first session that is now making the second session and it’s pretty cool to see them interacting with those boys and girls again because they know them.”

This year there were two sessions – the first from April 12 to May 26, then after a 10-day break, the second session began. The summer session will end on July 21.

“Brandi asked me to help her last year with the U8s because my sister was in that group,” Sorlie said. “I volunteered this year after hearing I could help coach again.

“I would like to continue coaching the U6s and U8s for the rest of my high school years. Coaching taught me to be very patient with young players. It also taught me to find other ways to drills and getting players to listen and interact.”

Each age group – the U6s and the U8s – is usually split into two smaller groups to try to make it easier for the teenagers to contain the energy and excitement.

“I try to have two coaches per court,” Harty said. “There are still a lot of kids playing, so it’s always nice to have two of the coaches together, because if a kid is struggling or needs help tying a shoe, a coach can focus on the help of this kid and the other can continue coaching.”

So what does coaching elementary school kids really look like? Is it controlling chaos or teaching skills?

According to Sorlie, it’s a bit of both.

jhs soccer player coach one 061622.jpg

Peyton Waliser of the Jamestown High School girls’ soccer team is helping kids coach this summer.

John M. Steiner / The Jamestown Sun

“While controlling the chaos is part of our responsibilities as coaches, coaching them on positioning real skills to help them improve their performance is the most important job we have,” Sorlie said.

To warm up, Sorlie said the kids were dribbling and focusing on their footwork. Sometimes there will be stints that focus on dribbling through the cones, ball control and small touches on the ball. Towards the end of practice, there’s usually a 4-on-4 scrum that works on passing, positioning, and opening up the kids for their teammates.

“I always wanted to be a coach once I came of age,” Brady said. “The thing we focus on the most is playing as a team because we prepare them to play at older ages.

“I like the amount of energy the kids have and the way they want to learn how to play football. It’s good to coach the kids – it has helped my presentation skills.”

Practices are held Tuesdays and Thursdays from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at the Jaycee Soccer Complex.

Harty sends a practice sheet to youth coaches so they know what needs to be covered throughout the hour. Harty said from there, it’s kind of up to high school kids how they want to approach the ins and outs of the practice.

“I think that experience taught me to explain things in simpler terms so that I was understood,” Traut said. “I also think it taught me immense patience. It can get a bit chaotic at times, but that’s normal with these young kids. It’s just a matter of balance.”

The U6 age group does not play any outdoor competitions but the youth teams play friendly matches such as during the Jamestown Jamboree which took place at the resort on June 11.

Although his young football players mainly train and compete, Harty said that if the U8 team gets enough support from parents, they will travel to Mandan to participate in the Splashdown 2022 tournament from 22-24 July.

“I see a bright future for the Blue Jays soccer teams,” Sorlie said. “There are a lot of kids who want to play, and if they stick with it, the soccer program is sure to be crowded. The kids seem to like it and they work hard during the hour I give them. see.”

Harty added:

“In larger communities you’ll see a lot more college players coaching and we have college players helping out, but in the summer a lot of them walk away. That’s why our high school kinda took on those kids and that’s a really good thing.”

jhs soccer player coach six 061622.jpg

Conner Traut of the Blue Jays soccer team is helping coach young players this summer.

John M. Steiner / The Jamestown Sun

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Bradford father of football kicked out of new coaching gig https://abilitiesnetworks.org/bradford-father-of-football-kicked-out-of-new-coaching-gig/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 20:00:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/bradford-father-of-football-kicked-out-of-new-coaching-gig/ “Your kids are only young once and spending a little extra time and creating new memories of being their coach is something that will last a lifetime,” says volunteer coach Bradford’s father, Mitch Peake, has always enjoyed playing football. “Football is a game that anyone can play. There isn’t a lot of equipment needed and […]]]>

“Your kids are only young once and spending a little extra time and creating new memories of being their coach is something that will last a lifetime,” says volunteer coach

Bradford’s father, Mitch Peake, has always enjoyed playing football.

“Football is a game that anyone can play. There isn’t a lot of equipment needed and it’s quite affordable for the average family,” he said.

As a youth, he played competitively for his hometown team in Orillia. But his competitive football career came to an abrupt halt at the age of 16, after he broke his leg in a semi-league final match.

Over the years, he continued to play in adult leagues and pickup games for fun.

“It’s a great way to get out and exercise. It’s great for cardio and you really get a full body workout when you play. Plus, it’s really fun to get out and work out. play ball with your friends,” he said.

His love for the game was passed on to his two young daughters, Mackenzie and Ryleigh, who have been playing soccer in the city’s recreational league for five years.

When an email went out earlier this spring looking for volunteer parent coaches for the season, Peake didn’t hesitate to put his name on the list.

Over the past month, he’s gone from being a football dad to coaching football for his two daughters’ teams, playing back-to-back on Tuesday nights at the Portuguese Cultural Centre.

“I’m ‘Coach Dad’ now,” he laughs. “It was (football) something I really enjoyed and they both seemed to enjoy playing, so rather than sitting on the sidelines I would rather have fun with them.”

Peake is coaching two groups of over 20 young girls this season, which he says has been busy, but as a teacher by trade he is used to working with large groups of students, helping them to achieve their goals.

Each week, he comes to the field early to help set up the nets and pylons to prepare for the week’s lesson and exercises. He recommends coaching to anyone who might think about it.

“If you want to spend a little more time doing that with your own kid and being a coach for them, I think that’s a great opportunity,” he says. “Your kids are only young once and spending a little extra time and creating new memories of being their coach is something that will last a lifetime.”

Peake says those who might be apprehensive about coaching can find plenty of resources online to help them get started.

“In addition to the other coaches who are there, let them inspire you a bit,” he says. “It’s definitely on me, if you’re on the fence about it the only way to find out if it’s for you is to go for it.”

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Kurtenbach: Steve Kerr performed a coaching masterpiece to win a fourth title for the Warriors https://abilitiesnetworks.org/kurtenbach-steve-kerr-performed-a-coaching-masterpiece-to-win-a-fourth-title-for-the-warriors/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 10:59:17 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/kurtenbach-steve-kerr-performed-a-coaching-masterpiece-to-win-a-fourth-title-for-the-warriors/ BOSTON — When Steve Kerr came to the Warriors, it was because the team needed a head coach who would reset the culture in Oakland. Five straight NBA Finals and a move across the bay later, it’s obvious Kerr could do it. The Warriors’ systems are the envy of the league and the team’s environment […]]]>

BOSTON — When Steve Kerr came to the Warriors, it was because the team needed a head coach who would reset the culture in Oakland.

Five straight NBA Finals and a move across the bay later, it’s obvious Kerr could do it.

The Warriors’ systems are the envy of the league and the team’s environment of positivity and accountability is legendary.

But the Warriors needed something more than a general coach this season, especially in the NBA Finals.

They needed a tactical master. Someone who could adapt to any situation and deploy his players perfectly. They needed someone to handle the mic.

It’s rare to be a quality team visionary. It’s hard to be a master of X’s and O’s.

To be both? That would arguably make someone the best coach in the NBA.

And that’s what Kerr has proven he is this season.

(Jose Carlos Fajardo/Bay Area News Group)

“Man, you talk about one of the greatest managers of all time,” said Andrew Wiggins, arguably Warriors Way’s poster child, after Game 6. “The way he challenges his players but supporting them is amazing, he gives his players confidence and he puts his players in position to succeed, so I’m really grateful to Steve Kerr.

Kerr’s adjustments throughout those NBA Finals were key to winning the series and a fourth title under his reign for the Dubs.

The first part of the series saw little between Golden State and Boston. The Celtics might have been the most talented team; certainly the most experienced Warriors. The basic tactics were in place for both teams from the start of Game 1 in San Francisco.

No, this streak was going to be won or lost to injury – and thank goodness it wasn’t a real factor – or a series of small adjustments that could turn out to make a big difference.

Beginning in Game 4, as the Warriors lost 2-1 in the series, Kerr completely outclassed Boston’s freshman head coach Ime Udoka. He worked on the rookie, and it resulted in three straight wins and a fourth NBA title in eight years.

For a coach who has so often failed the Warriors ideals, this was a performance of realpolitik from the Warriors head coach.

And that showed in his Draymond Green bench in the fourth quarter of that game.

It was a risky but necessary move. It paid off with Green’s finish in that game and at the end of the series.

During this time, the Boston coach had only one gesture: to implore his team to stop playing softly.

It stopped working around halftime in Game 4.

The Warriors, meanwhile, tinkered, mixed and matched until the final whistle.

And when Kerr found something that worked, he had no problem pressing the button again and again and again late in the series.

Kerr still had some remaining moves. He challenged Boston to counter. In the last two games, those counters haven’t come.

(Karl Mondon/Bay Area News Group)

The biggest adjustment the Warriors made came in Game 5, when Andrew Wiggins was paired with Jayson Tatum for every minute the latter was on the court.

In the NHL playoffs, teams try to match the lines – that was Kerr’s game of hockey.

Tatum shooting 16 of 38 over the last two games was more of a detriment than an advantage for the Celtics in the last two games. Wiggins made him question everything.

Earlier in the series, the Warriors had found some success with Gary Payton II in the rotation. He sat in Game 1, but he was an impact player in Game 2. Then Kerr couldn’t find him big minutes in Games 3 and 4.

This wasn’t an issue in Game 5 or Game 6, though. Kerr played Payton played 46 minutes — a top-five number on the Dubs in the final two games of the Finals — and had 21 points, eight rebounds, one block and six steals. No one has had a better net score than the Young Glove in the last two contests.

Kerr also staggered Kevon Looney and Green further in Games 5, 6 – their minutes on the court together were limited. Both players were wonderful, but having two non-shooters on the ground proved difficult for the Dubs, although there were defensive positives.

The last big adjustment Kerr made was to go against what had worked in the series up until Game 4.

But, believe me, it was a pragmatic decision.

The Celtics relied on the Warriors’ high pick-and-roll — a system that Golden State eschews on principle but began to use heavily in Game 1 due to Boston’s change-all defense.

But with Curry scoring 43 points in Game 4, Boston made it clear from the jump in Game 5 that they were going to have anyone but No. 30 beat them.

Kerr had planned the move, and the Warriors performed their traditional move sets almost exclusively for the final two games. Boston was stuck in no man’s land – the Warriors won the title.

There will be countless questions in the months to come about whether the Warriors can do it again – can they make another set of NBA Finals appearances?

There’s one question that won’t have to be asked, in any capacity: is the right person at the helm for what happens next?

Kerr has proven himself four times now, and it might have been the most impressive coaching performance of the lot.

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Meghan Markle pictured kissing a girl while coaching girls in an entrepreneurship course during the Invictus Games https://abilitiesnetworks.org/meghan-markle-pictured-kissing-a-girl-while-coaching-girls-in-an-entrepreneurship-course-during-the-invictus-games/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 18:14:20 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/meghan-markle-pictured-kissing-a-girl-while-coaching-girls-in-an-entrepreneurship-course-during-the-invictus-games/ Meghan Markle was revealed to be coaching girls as part of an entrepreneurship course during the Invictus Games. While in the Netherlands for husband Prince Harry’s sporting event in April, the Duchess of Sussex took on the role of guest coach for the programme. The Amsterdam-based Project Fearless initiative aims to provide tools for girls […]]]>

Meghan Markle was revealed to be coaching girls as part of an entrepreneurship course during the Invictus Games.

While in the Netherlands for husband Prince Harry’s sporting event in April, the Duchess of Sussex took on the role of guest coach for the programme.

The Amsterdam-based Project Fearless initiative aims to provide tools for girls and non-binary youth aged 9-14 to succeed in after-school programs.

Meghan was seen hugging a happy child participant and clapping with her palm up in a squad taken with the teenagers in photos released by the Dutch non-profit on Monday.

The Duchess sits cross-legged in a talking circle and stands in front of a whiteboard in another photo.

“Safe and supportive spaces like Project Fearless allow girls to express themselves, build each other up, build resilience and take on new challenges,” Meghan remarked.

Skateboarding and kickboxing are among the activities on offer, along with lessons in climate science and entrepreneurship.

The Duchess’ visit was announced to commemorate the third anniversary of the project.

According to the article, the former actress assisted students with their business presentations and “enthusiastic” participated in a group exercise on conquering fears.

The organization explained that “earlier this year, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex joined our first entrepreneurship course as a guest coach.”

“During her visit, she gave the girls inspiring and encouraging feedback on their sustainable business presentations, and enthusiastically joined in a group exercise on how to deal with fears.”

Project Fearless founder Merida Miller added that “The Duchess’ visit was a great way to celebrate the impact Project Fearless has had over the past three years, introducing girls to an accessible role model who makes a difference. and use his voice.”

↯↯↯Read more on the subject on TDPel Media ↯↯↯

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WPBSA Coaching Success in South Africa https://abilitiesnetworks.org/wpbsa-coaching-success-in-south-africa/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 12:50:40 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/wpbsa-coaching-success-in-south-africa/ Last month, delegates from South Africa became qualified Level 1 snooker coaches under the WPBSA Accredited Coaches Course programme. First launched in August 2020, the program aims to foster the development of snooker coaching around the world, supporting existing coaching programs run by recognized national and regional bodies by incorporating key elements of the WPBSA […]]]>

Last month, delegates from South Africa became qualified Level 1 snooker coaches under the WPBSA Accredited Coaches Course programme.

First launched in August 2020, the program aims to foster the development of snooker coaching around the world, supporting existing coaching programs run by recognized national and regional bodies by incorporating key elements of the WPBSA coaching program . This includes Child Safeguarding and Protection training developed by the WPBSA through its partnerships with UK Coaching and the NSPCC.

Through cooperation with Snooker and Billiards South Africa (SABSA), the initiative enabled 11 coaches to take the WPBSA Level 1 Coaching Course online in January and will for the first time offer snooker coaching a base platform in the country.

Successful delegates received their certificates, polo shirts, regulations and identity cards last month following the conclusion of this year’s South African Snooker Championships.

WPBSA Head of Coaching Development and Education Chris Lovell said: “This is a huge step forward from the WPBSA for national governing bodies and official associations around the world. Through the development and delivery of online coaching courses, we have a platform to achieve and pursue the growth of the sport worldwide. Congratulations to the South African team on their success and best wishes for their exciting endeavours.

Learn more about the WPBSA coaching program.

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The Inner Child Workshop: Life Coaching Program Unveiled to Help https://abilitiesnetworks.org/the-inner-child-workshop-life-coaching-program-unveiled-to-help/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 19:05:47 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/the-inner-child-workshop-life-coaching-program-unveiled-to-help/ Breadcrumb Links Newsfile Author of the article: Content of the article Austin, Texas – (Newsfile Corp. – June 9, 2022) – The “Inner Child Workshop,” launched by stefanossifandos.com, helps clients connect with their inner child, empowering them to overcome the challenges they face. are faced with on a daily basis. daily life. The “inner child” […]]]>

Content of the article

Austin, Texas – (Newsfile Corp. – June 9, 2022) – The “Inner Child Workshop,” launched by stefanossifandos.com, helps clients connect with their inner child, empowering them to overcome the challenges they face. are faced with on a daily basis. daily life.

The “inner child” is the part of people’s psyches associated with childhood experiences. This can often harbor experiences and traumas that are rooted deep in our subconscious. These can then express themselves in their daily lives through anxiety, depression, codependency and eating disorders, for example.

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Sifandossifandos.com points out that everyone has an inner child who needs attention and nurturing; Sifandos himself, the founder of stafanossifandos.com, said, “We all need to understand and connect with our inner child. By doing this we can find out what our inner child is looking for and what we can do to reduce the anxiety or stress felt by this very influential part of our psyche.

The three-day workshop consists of 1:1 coaching and virtual breakout room experiences, during which participants can share their findings in an intimate setting. It can help them unravel deep-seated feelings and thoughts. This is achieved by providing specialized tools and modalities to create meaningful transformation and break unhealthy patterns of behavior.

“Any childhood experience can take root and manifest as a reaction to trauma, even though the experience may not have seemed overwhelmingly significant at the time. It could have simply been a comment from a teacher that made us feel like we weren’t good enough, and it then stayed with us via our inner child. It’s important to understand that how our nervous system reacts to the world and to relationships is also influenced by the child. Through the Inner Child Workshop, we aim to bring up those pent-up emotions and release them in a healthy and liberating way,” emphasize Hassler and Sifandos.

The pandemic has brought new challenges to mental health, as disturbing numbers of Americans have experienced issues with anxiety and depression. This trend has been observed worldwide, with a 25% increase in the prevalence of these two mental disorders worldwide. Connecting with one’s inner child can offer a potential path to a healthier, less restless mind, as it helps people to act more intentionally and uncover the root causes of our mental afflictions.

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For example, studies have shown that many people with eating disorders have a “wounded” inner child that negatively impacts their adult lives. Additionally, a number of people with issues of trust, intimacy, addiction, compulsions, and co-dependency have been found to have a neglected inner child.

Sifandossifandos.com has applied its experience in personal development and behavioral sciences to help special forces soldiers, Olympic gold medalists, and more. The program’s coaches have over fifteen years of life coaching and spiritual psychology between them, having written three books, hosted a variety of wellness retreats, and hosted a podcast. Stefanossifandos.com brings its wisdom in the field of personal development to help its array of clients improve their health and well-being through the “Inner Child Workshop”.

Contact information:
Name: Stefanos Sifandos
Email: info@stefanossifandos.com

To view the source version of this press release, please visit https://www.newsfilecorp.com/release/127131

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After 2 years of Covid Break, Offline Kota Coaching remains the first choice for students https://abilitiesnetworks.org/after-2-years-of-covid-break-offline-kota-coaching-remains-the-first-choice-for-students/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 11:16:00 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/after-2-years-of-covid-break-offline-kota-coaching-remains-the-first-choice-for-students/ Also known as Shiksha Ki Kashi’ Kota’, the city will soar to higher progress this year. Recently, ALLEN Career Institute and Bodhi Tree Systems partnered and announced an investment of Rs 4500 crore in ALLEN. This strategic partnership will be a game-changer in the education sector. Brajesh MaheshwariDirector of the ALLEN Career Institute, said the […]]]>

Also known as Shiksha Ki Kashi’ Kota’, the city will soar to higher progress this year. Recently, ALLEN Career Institute and Bodhi Tree Systems partnered and announced an investment of Rs 4500 crore in ALLEN. This strategic partnership will be a game-changer in the education sector. Brajesh MaheshwariDirector of the ALLEN Career Institute, said the combination of ALLEN and Bodhi Tree System will prove to be a great chapter not only for ALLEN but also for Kota Coaching as it will take the Kota coaching model to new heights. With 138 study centers in 46 cities, the presence in India and the Middle Eastreflects GERMANthe progress and strength of since its inception. Over the past 12 years, 17 GERMAN students got All India Rank-1 in JEE and Medical entrance exams. Thanks to this, ALLEN Career Institute has become the first choice of students across the country due to its excellent results in JEE, NEET, Olympiad and other exams.

Secure environment

Kota is famous for its unique academic ecosystem and a safe environment with the best faculties and teaching methodology. Every year, many students from Cashmere in Kanyakumari and from northeast to west flock to the city to fulfill their dream career. More than 40-50 thousand female students from almost all states of the country come to study in Kota. These students, who live thousands of miles from home, enjoy a safe family environment in the city. Along with studies, institutes and local citizens take care of food and other amenities.

Start of Admissions

Admissions to Kota Coaching have begun, and after the end of board exams, strong growth in admissions is expected for this session. Students can be admitted in GERMAN by appearing in the GERMAN Scholarship Admission Test (ASAT). This examination is organized throughout the country. Depending on their test performance, students can get an admission scholarship of up to 90%.

Recognized by Prime Minister Modi

Career City Kota was also recognized as Care City during the Covid period. In collaboration with state and central government, the coaching institutes sent more than 50,000 students safely home. The quality of Kota Coaching’s teaching has been appreciated at all levels. During a speech, the Prime Minister Narendra Modi recognized Kota as Shiksha Ki Kashi. At various forums, Prime Minister Modi praised Kota for creating amazing career opportunities for kids. ALLEN Career Institute Director, dr. Govind Maheshwari, said that culture is also a priority in ALLEN along with education. Efforts are made for students to become good citizens while being doctors or engineers.

Learn at a young age

The first step towards a brighter career begins at an early age. Following this philosophy, students are now admitted to ALLEN from Class 6 to build a strong academic foundation. ALLEN Pre-Nurture Career Foundation (PNCF) prepares grades 6 through 10. Students are trained for National and International Olympiads, KVPY, NTSE, and other exams, as well as engineering and medical entrance exams. More than 10,000 students from pre-education classes 6 to 10 study at various coaching institutes in Kota. Children from HKG to Class 8 are guided on an experiential and playful basis to improve their brain development and intellectual abilities through the ALLEN IntelliBrain program and early childhood development. Naveen MaheshwariDirectorALLEN Career Institute said that if talent is cultivated from an early age, it can bring about significant change. ALLEN has taken quite a bit of initiative and is constantly moving in a direction where learning becomes fun.

ALLEN in every home

Talk to Mr. Rajesh MaheshwariDirector, ALLEN Career Institute said, ALLEN dream career for every aspirant. With this, we aim to provide coaching in all possible areas in the coming days. We will do everything we can to give the best results in all areas by providing the best teachers and resources.

From 8 students

New india the largest number of doctors and engineers are produced here in Kota. All credit for Kota coaching goes to the vision and foresight of Rajesh Maheshwariwho laid the foundation for the ALLEN Career Institute on April 18, 1988, from a small venue that quickly grew into a full-fledged institute offering coaching of all subjects under one roof. The institute is in the name of his father, the late Lakshmi Narayan (LN) Maheshwari. ALLEN is the first institute in Kota, which laid the foundation stone for organized coaching. Today, this sapling, which was planted with 8 students, has grown into a big tree where students across the country seek guidance for their dream careers. Today, with 34 years of unstoppable legacy, GERMAN gets stronger every day.

Start in business

ALLEN Career Institute will also guide students who aspire to a career in commerce. The trade batches for the students of class 11 and 12 of the academic session 2022-23 will start from the last week of June and the first of July in the study centers located in Kota and Bombay. ALLEN Commerce Division will guide students for Class 11, Class 12, CA Foundation Course, and CS Executive Entrance Test. The institute will also offer offline and recorded course backups for review.

Kota Coaching now abroad

The excellence of Kota coaching is no longer limited to India. With GERMAN Overseas, the legacy of Kota coaching is now spreading overseas. Great enthusiasm is being seen among students and parents as Allen kicks off his classroom coaching study centers in the Middle East. Currently, study centers are operating in Abu Dhabi, dubai, Qatarand Sharjah. At the same time, online courses are available in Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Saudi Arabiaand Nepal.

Kota Coaching students admit MIT

With the support of the ALLEN Global Studies Division (AGSD), students are admitted to top universities around the world. Allenite Chitraang Murdia and Stuti Khandwala was admitted to MIT UNITED STATES. Apart from them, students have been selected by many universities including Oxford, Cambridge, Toronto, WarwickPordu, Singapore, Pennsylvaniaand melbourne. Students who aspire to study abroad in foreign universities come to the city of Kota. At AGSD, students receive comprehensive guidance and coaching for SET, ACT, IELTS, TOEFL and GMAT.

Best results in all areas

Kota Coaching has given the best results in JEE and medicine year after year. 17 students have attained All India Rank-1 in the last 12 years from GERMAN. Mridul Agarwala student in class from ALLEN Career Institute, got All India Rank-1 in JEE-Advanced 2021. Mridul Agarwal was a student in ALLEN’s classroom program for four consecutive years, grades 9 through 12. This is the fourth time in the past 8 years that ALLEN Student has achieved All India 1 ranking. Earlier, Chitrang Murdiya in 2014, Aman Bansal in 2016, and Kartikeya Gupta in 2019 secured Rank 1 of All India.

Similarly, in NEET-2021, five ALLEN Career Institute students reached the AIR Top 5 and dominated in 16 states. In 2020, Soyeb Aftab of ALLEN earned Rank 1 of All India by scoring 720 dots out of 720. Previously, in AIIMS-2017 results, all top 10 ranks were ALLEN students and listed in the Limca Book of Records.

Innovation in Education

Kota coaching is famous for its educational trends and innovations. Reliable Institute HODs have started using artificial intelligence and machine learning in their university system. They use artificial intelligence and machine learning tools to assess student performance analysis and paper analysis. The use of advanced technology is appreciated by parents and students across the country.

ALLEN’s presence in these cities

ALLEN has classroom study centers in 42 cities around the India. These are Kota, Ahmedabad, Bangalore, Bhilwara, Bhopal, Bilaspur, Bhubaneswar, ChennaiChandigarh, Coimbatore, Churu-Taranagar, Panchkula, Mohali, Dehradun, Durgapur, Guwahati, Gwalior, Hisar, Indore, Jammu, Jaipur, Jodhpur, Kochi, Mangaluru, BombayMysuru, Nanded, Nagpur, Nashik, Pondicherry, PuneRaipur, Rajkot, Ranchi, Rawatbhata, Sikar, Srinagar, Surat, Siliguri, Tirupati, Ujjain and Vadodara. Apart from this, ALLEN offers integrated school programs in Buldana, Dharamabad, Bundi, Jhunjhunu and Pavaai.

About ALLEN

ALLEN is india leading coaching institute for the preparation of JEE (Advanced), JEE (Main), Pre-Medical (NEET-UG), CA, CS, Class VI to X, KVPY, NTSE, National and International Olympiads. At ALLEN, the focus is on building a strong foundation of knowledge and concepts in students for their success. ALLEN’s core values ​​of Determination, Honesty, Authenticity, Integrity, Devotion, Humanism, Holistic Learning, Social Ethics, and Concern for Society and the Environment are all tightly interwoven into the fabric of its academic programs. With over 34 years of legacy of success. ALLEN’s unparalleled education system with Indian values ​​and a pool of talented students joining ALLEN makes the institute a national level competition provider. Since its inception, ALLEN has coached over 2.5 million students across the country. Highly professional and experienced team of over 11,000 members including IITian, ​​Doctor, CA and CS professionals as faculties who are dedicated and committed to comprehensive student success and provide a nurturing environment for students for their social development , cultural, academic and global . To reach every child, ALLEN has spread its wings in India and abroad. More information is available at www.Allen.ac.in

Photo: https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/1831423/ALLEN_admission_Kota.jpg
Logo: https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/1831424/ALLEN_Career_Institute_Logo.jpg

SOURCE ALLEN Career Institute

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What is a Professional Coach? https://abilitiesnetworks.org/what-is-a-professional-coach/ Tue, 31 May 2022 11:40:11 +0000 https://abilitiesnetworks.org/what-is-a-professional-coach/ Coach originally means “carriage” and has been used in sport in England and the United States since 1885. In “The Bass Handbook of Leadership, Theory, Research, and Managerial Applications” (4th edition, New York, 2008, p. 1091), Bernard M. Bass defines coaching as “the advice and feedback on the specific knowledge, skills, and abilities involved in […]]]>

Coach originally means “carriage” and has been used in sport in England and the United States since 1885. In “The Bass Handbook of Leadership, Theory, Research, and Managerial Applications” (4th edition, New York, 2008, p.

1091), Bernard M. Bass defines coaching as “the advice and feedback on the specific knowledge, skills, and abilities involved in a task”. There are few professions that are as under-described as tennis coaching.

Therefore, it can be difficult to define the profession itself, and it opens the door for non-coaches to act as professional tennis coaches, misuse the name coach, mislead the market into mistake and thus crush the status of professional tennis coach.

Due to the wide range of issues and challenges that need to be resolved around a tennis player, PBGs, boyfriends and girlfriends (PBGs) and others can feel like a professional tennis coach! But can PBGs be coaches? Does a caregiver become a doctor or a nurse when caring for their sick child, PBGs or husband/wife at home? Of course not!

The role that PBGs play in an athlete’s sport engagement is under intense scrutiny today. The confusion is that anyone can call themselves a trainer, coach or consultant. Trainers, coaches and consultants are (currently) not protected professional titles.

Basically, anyone can call themselves a coach and offer a corresponding service. But is it really a problem that people without specific education and training call themselves coaches? In fact, without PBGs supporting their players, it would be very difficult to achieve high performance goals.

PBGs are the basis of the device for all education and behavior. A decent childhood setup with good values ​​makes it easier for the pro coach to get results with the player. Moreover, the emotional part is also extremely important for the player.

A strong emotional life and relationship can be the deciding factor in a long and successful career. The interactive person-centered tasks of the professional coach are obviously to teach all professional aspects of the game of tennis, to develop balance and mental and physical strength, to promote awareness, responsibility and self-reflection, and to enhance or expand perception, experience and behavior. .

In addition, the professional coach must professionally guide, promote, support and advise the player, PBGs, initiate individual development processes and unite in a professional team. However, professional coaching is time-limited and solution-oriented advice on a temporary basis.

PBGs are long-term, private relationships that shouldn’t be compromised because of tennis. Therefore, it is essential that PBGs do not act as professional coaches. In fact, everyone on the team has an important role, and each role has the same value – just different.

PBGs do not have “open” business relationships and it is more or less impossible to end them. It’s a relationship full of dependencies. The minute PBGs interfere in the professional process, they lose their PBG status – and that’s not good for the team.

This often creates personal vendettas and team mistrust. Therefore, the role of PBGs is paradoxical; it can be very helpful or destructive. Negative pressure can consist of forcing a player to train, take lessons or participate in matches.

PBG expectations and excessive criticism of a player’s efforts will feed fear and more mistakes will be made. However, many top players are said to have PBGs very involved in their tennis experience who instill in them the core values ​​necessary for tennis success, and support has been associated with enjoyment, performance and self-esteem. ‘a player.

I’ve been on the court with players whose abilities range from beginners to Grand Slam winners and Olympic medalists. Each player “ticked” differently. Different minds and mentalities, different body types and different physical “drivers”.

As a professional coach, it is important to find the key to each player and the PBGs involved and to define and communicate the course, build the structure, control the strategy and educate the environment for the best of the full team.

Finally, just be a parent, boyfriend or girlfriend who is supportive and interested in your favorite person and family member. They need you as you are, and you are good and important as you are! You don’t need the coaching title, you’re a VIP – you’re a PGB. Let the coach do his job!

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